inform engage

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... a connected street network can serve to improve emergency response times. ..... Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing ..... The relationship between urban form and transportation can be expressed in terms of density, ..... paired with a street extension at Carolina Street and shared lane markings.

DRAFT

WHAT IS A COMPREHENSIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN?

INTRODU CTIO N

THE PLANNING PROCESS The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update represents a collaborative effort to establish a vision for the Town’s transportation network and identify a coordinated set of

A Comprehensive

multimodal projects to achieve it. The plan addresses existing issues and anticipated concerns for

Transportation Plan, or CTP,

congestion, safety, access, and connectivity for all modes of transportation. The process began with

serves as a roadmap for how

an explanation of socioeconomic conditions, a review of plans and policies, and an assessment of the

transportation will develop in

current transportation network. A set of guiding statements were developed ahead of creating a

Morrisville. This effort will

coordinated set of multimodal recommendations. Once the full set of recommendations were

examine the many changes

developed, a prioritization process was created as a tool to help guide decision makers as they

that have occurred in the

advocate for future funding. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update

Town’s population,

serves as the Town’s transportation vision, characterizes current and future transportation needs, and

employment, land use and

documents multi-modal transportation strategies to address needs through the year 2040. The

development since the

graphic below outlines the planning process for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive

adoption of the 2009

Transportation Plan Update.

Transportation Plan. It will focus on all modes of

Figure 1-1: Planning Process

transportation including roadway, bicycle, pedestrian, and transit. WHY IS AN UPDATE NEEDED? The last CTP was adopted in 2009 and much has changed in Morrisville since that time. There have been shifts in population and employment, new developments have been built, and some transportation policies have changed as well. In addition, many transportation improvements identified in the previous plan have already been advanced to funding and implementation. With these changes in mind, the Town will work with the public to re-evaluate the vision, goals, objectives, and strategies set forth in the 2009

ENGAGEMENT Public outreach – whether through direct engagement or by input of community proxies – is an important part of a successful transportation plan. The two primary goals of engagement for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update are to inform and engage the public.

plan.

INFORM

ENGAGE

Informing the public requires the thoughtful translation of engineering and planning vernacular into common English. The initial step of informing the public is to communicate the purpose of the Transportation Plan and how it affects them. Once the public understands the value of the plan and its goals and objectives, they can then engage the planning process. Engaging the public necessitates empowering them to speak up paired with listening to their thoughts and opinions. Those who have the most to gain or lose from investments in the transportation system have perspectives that must be valued when developing project, policy, and program recommendations. The planning process included several avenues of public engagement to improve the likelihood that the feedback obtained was representative of the entire community. 1-1 | P A G E

DRAFT Engagement Strategies

The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update included a variety of strategies that intended to capture feedback from a cross-section of those who live, work, recreate, or have a stake in the Plan’s recommendations. The engagement strategies included: ·

Community Event Outreach at SpringFest

·

Planning and Zoning Board Work Sessions

·

Town Council Work Sessions

·

2 Public Workshops

·

2 Public Open Houses

·

3 Plan Update Presentations

·

1 Online Survey

The following sections detail several of the engagement strategies. A full compendium of the public engagement process can be found in Appendix C.

PUBLIC WORKSHOPS AND OPEN HOUSES

Gathering input from the public throughout the planning process is critical to understanding local needs, identifying projects of importance, and gaining buy-in to see projects progress from planning to implementation. Citizens recognize the strengths and shortcomings of their transportation system, and transportation decisions affect them daily. To fully utilize the knowledge of Morrisville residents, the project team conducted two public workshops and two public open houses. Meeting attendees were updated about the plan and encouraged to participate in the interactive activities.

Public Workshop #1 – October 6th, 2016

The objective of the first public workshop was to educate the public about the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update and to obtain input regarding their priorities and goals, mobility issues, and desired routes and destinations. The open house was a drop-in session with several interactive activities.

Open House #1 – February 28th, 2017 The first open house event was structured to

inform the public about the process of developing recommendations. Exhibits showed existing conditions, results from the first public workshop and online survey, and recommendations from previous planning efforts. Participants visited stations around the room to follow the “Roadway to Recommendations.”

Public Workshop #2 – June 29th, 2017 The second public workshop introduced members of the public to the preliminary recommendations for all modes of transportation, solicited feedback on prioritization metrics, and sought guidance in development of priorities for the key corridors.

Open House #2 – August 22nd, 2017 The final open house meeting focused on

displaying draft multimodal recommendations and the results of the prioritization process.

ONLINE SURVEY

An interactive online survey was available beginning in October of 2016. Over the next three months, more than 250 participants offered input on community preferences, opinions, and issues for the various transportation modes. Participants also identified issues and potential solutions by placing icons on a map. The online survey yielded more than 600 data points for consideration during the development of the plan. The map on the following page shows the results of the interactive mapping portion.

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DRAFT

INTRODU CTIO N

Figure 1-2: Results of mapping exercise of online survey

Map Produced September 2017

1-3 | P A G E

DRAFT GUIDING STATEMENTS The guiding statements in this section represent six interrelated value statements established in accordance with national, state, and regional long range planning goals. The final guiding statements have been refined with guidance provided by the Town of Morrisville’s Planning and Zoning Board, Town Council, and public and are reflective of the Town’s needs and desires for the future of the transportation system. The established guiding statements provided direction for the entirety of the planning process and served as a tool for prioritizing recommendations – an important step as the Town faces the need to balance competing interests with limited transportation dollars. The statements consist of a key phrase (i.e. guiding principle) with supporting description. Each guiding principle is further clarified by a set of three of planning goals.

CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT

Enhance the Town’s quality of life by preserving and promoting its valued places and natural assets.

Local, state, and federal planning guidelines have evolved over recent decades to place additional emphasis on the role transportation plays in conserving the environment, preserving our neighborhoods, and protecting the quality of life. For the Town of Morrisville this process has been aided through land use planning, development controls, environmental planning, and socioeconomic awareness. · ·

·

Protect and enhance the natural and social environment by using context sensitive transportation strategies. Minimize direct and indirect environmental impacts of the transportation system while planning and prioritizing transportation recommendations. Promote consistency between transportation improvements, land use decisions, and economic development patterns.

ECONOMIC VITALITY

Support the local economy by making it easier to move people and freight around and through the Town.

Ensuring transportation investments support economic vitality in the Town is critical. Good transportation investments address industry needs such as shipping goods, encouraging economic growth, and improving access to regional assets such as Research Triangle Park and the Raleigh-Durham International Airport. The intent is to identify improvements that position the Town to be competitive in local, regional, and national markets. · · ·

Identify transportation recommendations that enable global competitiveness, productivity, and efficiency. Increase the accessibility and mobility of people and freight within the Town and regionally. Leverage gateways and aesthetics to create an atmosphere that fosters economic investment.

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Make travel more efficient by coordinating transportation investments with land use decisions.

Transportation facilities and networks have the influence to transform development patterns, property values, and help shape a town’s quality of life. How communities spatially assemble affects how accessible and appealing public transportation, bicycling, and walking are in the Town. · ·

·

1-4 | P A G E

Promote denser mixed-use developments that are supportive of transit, bicycle, and pedestrian activity. Prepare for continued population growth by coordinating transportation strategies with land use initiatives to foster a vibrant and livable community. Connect people to jobs and educational opportunities through coordinated transportation and land use investment decisions.

DRAFT

INTRODU CTIO N

MOBILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY

Provide a balanced transportation system that makes it easier to walk, ride a bike, and take transit.

As auto-oriented growth has influenced street design for the past few decades, streets have increasingly become unaccommodating, unsafe, and inaccessible for non-motorized users. Strategic investment in major roadways must be balanced with improvements to the bicycle, pedestrian, transit, and rail networks to keep people and goods moving, allow better access for residents and visitors, and enhance quality of life in the Town. This concept seeks to enhance mobility and accessibility and provide residents with transportation options by combining multimodal improvements with nearly every roadway enhancement. ·

· ·

Provide desirable and user-friendly transportation options for all user groups regardless of socioeconomic status or physical ability. Support a fully integrated multimodal network that advances the concept of complete streets. Expand and maintain a network of bicycle, pedestrian, and transit facilities that connects homes, activity centers, and complementary amenities.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

Promote a safe and secure transportation system by reducing crashes and improving emergency response.

Reducing transportation fatalities and serious injuries includes integrating safety enhancements in all transportation projects for both motorized and non-motorized users. Additionally, encouraging a connected street network can serve to improve emergency response times. · ·

·

Improve the safety of the transportation system for all user groups regardless of socioeconomic status or physical ability. Increase the reliability, predictability, and efficiency of the transportation experience through system improvements and enhanced communication. Improve safety and security by mitigating potential conflicts and delays at high-accident locations and rail crossing sites.

SYSTEM PRESERVATION AND EFFICIENCY

Improve the transportation system’s longevity by emphasizing maintenance and operational efficiency.

A transportation network with high mobility is critical for sustaining and extending economic development. Ensuring local and regional mobility is an exercise in maximizing the capacity of the existing transportation system through systems management approaches. These approaches include monitoring and addressing pavement quality and ensuring that ancillary facilities such as traffic signals and ITS infrastructure are properly deployed. · ·

·

Increase the lifespan of existing infrastructure and ensure transportation facilities are used optimally. Maintain the transportation network by identifying and prioritizing infrastructure preservation and rehabilitation projects such as pavement management and signal system upgrades. Increase the use of innovative transportation technology to enhance the efficiency of the existing transportation system and to be better prepared for emerging vehicle technologies.

1-5 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

INTRODUCTION Transportation is not only a critical component of our daily life, but also represents a crucial part of a region’s social fabric and manmade infrastructure. Residents rely on transportation to access education, health care, and jobs, while surrounding cities, towns, and industries rely on a functioning network to keep the region moving. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update considers how Morrisville will grow in the next 25 years and offers strategies to guide improvements to the Town’s transportation system including its roadways, transit services, sidewalks, bike facilities, and greenways. The initial step of the planning process is establishing a robust understanding of the geographic, administrative, operational, environmental, social, and temporal context of Morrisville today. This understanding, along with input obtained during the public engagement process, will set the stage for the development of recommendations that will be responsive to the needs and values of the community. This Existing Conditions Summary is intended to present a snapshot of Morrisville as it is today and includes facts and figures depicting the land uses, development constraints, community characteristics, travel patterns, and mobility options that characterize the Town. Effective transportation planning acknowledges the critical relationship between land use and transportation: the way land is used places demands on the transportation network, and the layout and character of the transportation network drives the type, density, and location of development. The first section of the Existing Conditions Summary describes the LAND of Morrisville, how it is currently being used, and constraints on its use. This section also identifies important community facilities that the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update will need to consider when emphasizing connectivity and accessibility. The next section describes the PEOPLE of Morrisville. Morrisville’s population is diverse, highly educated, and is continuing to grow at a rapid pace. Also included is an investigation of where Morrisville’s residents work, how they get there, and how long it takes to get there. Finally, the TRANSPORTATION section describes Morrisville’s transportation network, including its roadways, sidewalks, on-street bikeways, multi-use paths, and transit routes. Estimations of traffic volumes and congestion, an understanding of crashes occurring in the last 3 years, and an inventory of existing infrastructure will provide a foundation for the development of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update.

LAND The Town of Morrisville is located in northwest Wake County and along the southern border of Durham County. Morrisville rests in the midst of the Research Triangle Region, which is anchored by three major universities; the cities of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill; and Research Triangle Park (RTP). Research Triangle Park, a 7,000-acre research park west of Morrisville, employs over 50,000 people across 200 companies. Bordering the west, south, and east sides of Morrisville, the Town of Cary houses several worldwide company headquarters and, like Morrisville, has seen continual growth. Raleigh-Durham International Airport, one of North Carolina’s two primary airports, is located on the north side of I-40. Morrisville’s proximity to RTP, the interstate, and RDU has attracted several major companies including Lenovo, Time Warner Cable, NetApp, and Pharmaceutical Product Development (PPD). Paired with its community facilities including several parks and schools, it is no surprise that the Town’s population growth continues to outpace Wake County’s. Morrisville’s regional context is shown in Figure 2-1. Unincorporated Wake County and unincorporated Durham County are shown in dark gray.

2-1 | P A G E

DRAFT Community Facilities The Town’s Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Resources Department maintains several greenways, parks, and facilities that offer outdoor and indoor recreation opportunities to Morrisville residents, listed in Table 2-1. Crabtree Creek Nature Park is currently a multi-purpose field, but the Town of Morrisville has plans to develop it into a more substantial Nature Park in the future. Outside of Morrisville but adjacent to the Town are Lake Crabtree County Park and William B. Umstead State Park. There are three schools located within Morrisville’s town boundary: Morrisville Elementary, Sterling Montessori, and Cedar Fork Elementary. The combined enrollment for the three schools is 2,368 students. Figure 2-2 shows Morrisville’s community facilities. Table 2-1. Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Resources

Greenways Indian Creek Greenway & Trailhead Shiloh Greenway Crabtree Creek and Hatcher Creek Greenway (Future) Parks Cedar Fork District Park Church Street Park Crabtree Creek Nature Park Morrisville Community Park Northwest Park Ruritan Park Shiloh Community Park Community Centers Cedar Fork Community Center Morrisville Aquatics & Fitness Center Luther Green Community Center

2-2 | P A G E

EXIST ING CONDITIONS

DRAFT Land Use

The Town of Morrisville classifies every parcel based on the land use classifications described in Table 2-2 and Figure 2-3. The majority of Morrisville’s land is classified as residential (33%) or vacant (21%). Table 2-2 : Land Use C lassifications

Classification

Acreage

Percent

Commercial

409.6

7.9%

Industrial

671.2

12.9%

Institutional

243.4

4.7%

Mixed Use

13.8

0.3%

Multifamily

393.1

7.6%

Office

365.1

7.0%

Public/Private Open Space

705.5

13.6%

Single-Family Attached

149.7

2.9%

Single-Family Detached

1154.9

22.2%

Vacant

1094.2

21.0%

Total

5200.6

100%

2-3 | P A G E

DRAFT Figure 2-1: Local Jurisdictions

Map Produced September 2017

2-4 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-2: Commun ity Facilities

Map Produced September 2017

2-5 | P A G E

DRAFT Figure 2-3: Existing Land Use (October 2016)

Map Produced September 2017

2-6 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Zoning

Morrisville adopted their Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) in 2013. A Town-wide rezoning was completed in 2014 to make the Town’s zoning map consistent with the UDO. The UDO combines the Town’s zoning ordinance and subdivision ordinance into one document to simplify communication and enforcement. Zoning west of NC 54 includes low, medium, and high density residential uses with a strong emphasis on neighborhood and community spaces. Zoning east of NC 54 includes the majority of Morrisville’s industrial, office, and commercial areas. The Town of Morrisville’s zoning includes two Airport Overlay Districts, a Floodplain Overlay District, and a Town Center Conservation Overlay District. The Airport Noise Overlay District restricts certain development types, resulting in the majority of residences and schools being located west of NC 54. Airport Overlay District A’s western border is NC 54, and Airport Overlay District B is located almost entirely west of NC 54. The Floodplain Overlay District encompasses the area within the 100-year floodplain, and the Town Center Conservation Overlay District includes the area surrounding Morrisville-Carpenter Road’s intersections with Town Hall Drive and NC 54, detailed in the 2007 Town Center Plan.

Development Constraints

There are a number of challenges that impact the Town’s planning and development. The Town is completely bordered by other jurisdictions, leaving limited options for annexation. Crabtree Creek, which passes through the southern portion of Morrisville, does not meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards and is classified as a 303(d) impaired stream. This classification is supplemented with a unique management plan that may affect development near the creek. Additionally, Morrisville housed the Koppers Company, Inc. plant, a facility that processed and treated wood. The EPA found that the site was contaminated in 1980 and proceeded with cleanup efforts. While there is currently no environmental hazard on the site, it is still on the Superfund list and is being monitored by the EPA. Other environmental constraints in Morrisville include floodplains, wetlands, stream buffers, and steep slopes. The Town of Morrisville requires buffers on both intermittent and perennial streams. The Town is also a Phase II stormwater community and is in both the Jordan Lake and Neuse River watersheds. The railroad corridor running alongside NC 54, owned by North Carolina Railroad and operated by Norfolk Southern, requires that new roadway, sidewalk, and bicycle connections across the railroad must be constructed as grade-separated crossings, with some exceptions. While this requirement mitigates potential train collisions at at-grade railroad crossings, it also results in increased costs associated with new east-west connections.

2-7 | P A G E

DRAFT Figure 2-4: Zoning (August 2016)

Map Produced September 2017

2-8 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-5: Development Constraints

Map Produced September 2017

2-9 | P A G E

DRAFT PEOPLE Morrisville’s population of over 23,000 people continues to grow. The number, charts, and tables in this section reflect the latest demographic data made available by the United States Census Bureau and the State Demographics branch of the North Carolina Office of State Budget and Management (OSBM), which includes the 2014 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, the Special Census of Morrisville conducted in 2015, and OSBM’s online resources.

People & Households

Morrisville has seen tremendous population growth in the last 15 years. Since 2000, Morrisville’s population has more than quadrupled, as shown in Figure 2-6. The North Carolina state demographer lists Morrisville as the 14th fastest growing municipality in the state for the period from 2010 to 2014. Figure 2-6: Population Growth

23,820

25,000 18,702

20,000 15,000

11,834

10,000 5,547 5,000

2015

2010

2005

2000

-

Morrisville’s growth corresponds to Wake County’s rapid growth as people move to the region to enjoy its high quality of life, excellent school system, and strong job market. Figure 2-7 compares Morrisville’s, Wake County’s, and North Carolina’s population growth rates between 2000 and 2014. Although Morrisville’s growth rate has slowed in more recent years, it continues to outpace Wake County and the state as a whole. Figure 2-7: Population Growth Rate Comparison

25% 20% 15% 10% 5%

Morrisville

Wake County

2010

2005

2000

0%

North Carolina

According to the 2014 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Morrisville’s population is relatively young compared to Wake County. The population older than 65 years of age comprises only 4% in Morrisville, compared to 9% in Wake County. On the other end of the spectrum, residents under 18 years of age comprise nearly 30% of the population, compared to 25% in Wake County. Figure 2-8 shows Morrisville’s age and sex distribution based on data from the Town of Morrisville’s Special Census conducted in the spring of 2015.

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EXIST ING CONDITIONS

DRAFT Figure 2-8: Percent Population by Age & Se x 85 years and over 80 to 84 years 75 to 79 years 70 to 74 years 65 to 69 years 60 to 64 years 55 to 59 years 50 to 54 years 45 to 49 years 40 to 44 years 35 to 39 years 30 to 34 years 25 to 29 years 20 to 24 years 15 to 19 years 10 to 14 years 5 to 9 years Under 5 years

Female

10

8

6

4

2

0

2

4

6

Male

8

10

Morrisville is home to a racially diverse population. Approximately 47% of Morrisville’s population is identified as white, 15% African-American, and 34% Asian. About 5% of the population identifies themselves as Hispanic or Latino. Figure 2-9 shows the breakdown of Morrisville’s racial profile in comparison to Wake County and North Carolina. Figure 2-9: Race

Town of Morrisville 4%

6%

White Black/African American

34%

47%

North Carolina

Wake County 5%

2%

7%

21%

21%

Asian 68%

Other Race/Two or More Races

70%

15%

The median household income for households in Morrisville in 2014 was $84,301, which is significantly higher than Wake County’s $66,579 median income and the national median income of $53,482. Along with higher median incomes, a greater percentage of Morrisville residents have obtained higher levels of education than Wake County and North Carolina. The 2014 American Community Survey data indicate that of the residents over age 25 in Morrisville, 41% have earned a Bachelor’s degree and another 24% have a Master’s degree or higher. Table 2-3 and Table 2-4 display the number of households (owner-occupied and renter-occupied), income, and education characteristics of Morrisville, Wake County, and North Carolina. Table 2-3: Household Cha racteristics

Number of Households Average Size Median Income Percent Below Poverty Line Percent without Access to a Motor Vehicle

Town of Morrisville 7,905 2.62 $84,301 4.8% 1.1%

Wake County 355,647 2.62 $66,579 8.2% 2.0%

North Carolina

Town of Morrisville 10.1% 40.8% 24.0%

Wake County 16.8% 31.2% 17.1%

North Carolina

3,742,514 2.54 $46,693 17.2% 2.5%

Table 2-4: Highest E ducation Leve l

High School Diploma/GED Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional Degree

26.9% 18.2% 9.5%

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DRAFT Employment

Morrisville is in the middle of the Raleigh/Durham/Research Triangle Park area. According to the 2014 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates and displayed in Figure 2-10, over a quarter of Morrisville’s employees work in the industry described as “professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services” by the U.S. Census Bureau. Educational services and health care and social assistance account for a fifth of the Town’s employment. Based on the 2014 American Community Survey, the average travel time to work for residents in Morrisville was 21 minutes, compared with 24 minutes for Wake County and the state of North Carolina. Figure 2-10 displays Morrisville employment by industry. Figure 2-11 and Figure 2-12 show residents’ commute times to work and the distance traveled to work. Figure 2-10: Employment by Industry

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining

0.0%

Construction

1.7%

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities

2.4%

Public administration

2.5%

Wholesale trade

3.4%

Information

3.5%

Other services, except public administration

3.9%

Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation and food services

5.7%

Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing

7.7%

Retail trade

8.9%

Manufacturing

13.8%

Educational services, and health care and social assistance

20.4%

Professional, scientific, and mgmt, and admin and waste mgmt services

26.1% 0%

5%

10%

Figure 2-11: C ommute Time

Less than 10 minutes 10 to 19 minutes 18%

34%

28%

12% 4%4%

20 to 29 minutes 30 to 39 minutes 40 to 59 minutes An hour or longer

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Figure 2-12: Commute Distance

Less than 10 miles 53%

32%

10 to 24 miles

2% 13%

25 to 50 miles 0%

2-12 | P A G E

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Greater than 50 miles

15%

20%

25%

30%

EXIST ING CONDITIONS

DRAFT

Only 6.4% of Morrisville residents stay in Morrisville for work, while 22.3% commute to Raleigh, 18.6% to Durham, and 15.7% to Cary. Thirty-seven percent of Morrisville residents commute to other places such as RTP, Chapel Hill, and Apex. Figure 2-13 shows the jurisdictions Morrisville’s residents commute to, while Figure 2-14 shows the counties Morrisville’s residents commute to. This information indicates that a large percentage of Morrisville residents are traveling to work outside of Morrisville, emphasizing the need for safe and efficient access to the interstate and major arterials while supporting connectivity and mobility within Morrisville. Eight out of ten Morrisville residents drive alone to work (consistent with Wake County as a whole), while approximately 8% participate in a carpool. About 8% work from home and 1% walk to work. Less than 1% take transit or bike to work. A high percentage driving or carpooling to work is likely the result of Morrisville residents working outside of Morrisville, a lack of transit services, and low bicycle and pedestrian connectivity. Figure 2-15 shows a detailed breakdown of Morrisville residents’ means of transportation to work. Figure 2-13: Workplace by City

Raleigh

22.3%

Cary 37.0%

Morrisville

Durham 15.7%

Other 18.6%

6.4%

Figure 2-14: Workplace by County

19.8% Wake County Durham County

54.6%

Other

25.7%

Figure 2-15: C ommute Modes

Drive Alone Carpool

0.63%

Take Transit Bike Walk Other

0.08% 82.43%

17.57%

7.86%

1.20%

0.06% 7.73%

Work from Home

2-13 | P A G E

DRAFT TRANSPORTATION The transportation network within and around Morrisville is primarily oriented to serve automobile travel. Several major roadways, detailed in Table , serve the Town including I-40, I-540, and the Triangle Expressway (NC 147 and NC 540) to the north; Davis Drive to the west and NC 54 to the east, which bisects the Town from north to south; and several east-west corridors including McCrimmon Parkway, Airport Boulevard, Morrisville-Carpenter Road, Aviation Parkway, Morrisville Parkway, and NW Cary Parkway. The rapid development of residential subdivisions without investment in major roadway projects has yielded a disconnected street network and stresses the Town’s major corridors. Roadways within the Town are owned and maintained by either NCDOT, the Town of Morrisville, or private entities such as neighborhood associations. NCDOT maintains the following roads within the Town of Morrisville:

·

Airport Boulevard

·

McCrimmon Parkway

·

Aviation Parkway

·

Morrisville Carpenter Road

·

Cary Parkway

·

Morrisville Parkway

·

Church Street

·

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road)

·

Davis Drive

·

NC 540

·

Evans Road

·

Old Maynard Road

·

Holly Creek Road

·

Slater Road

·

Jerusalem Drive

·

Sorrell Grove Church Road

·

Kit Creek Road

·

Watkins Road (partial)

·

Lichtin Boulevard (partial)

·

Wilson Road

·

Louis Stephens Road

While the Town’s walking and bicycling network has seen significant growth and many opportunities for increased access to transit exist, Morrisville’s growth patterns and commuting trends continue to present significant challenges for the Town of Morrisville to overcome when considering how best to maintain and improve its transportation network.

Motor Vehicle Volumes

NCDOT collects traffic volume data on state-maintained roadways every other year and develops estimates called average annual daily traffic volumes (AADTs) which represent two-way traffic volumes on an average weekday. The most recent segment level AADTs for the state-maintained roadways in Morrisville are from 2013 and are shown in Table 2-5 and Figure 2-16. NCDOT traffic volume data is not available for the roadway segments without color, and traffic volume data at the segment level is not yet been made available. Figure 2-16 also shows the percentage of traffic consisting of single-unit or trailer trucks.

Modeled Traffic Congestion

Sophisticated models can simulate the interaction of estimated demand and available supply at a regional scale. The Triangle Regional Model comprises both the Raleigh urbanized area and the Durham-Chapel Hill urbanized area. For the purposes of this Existing Conditions Summary, current congestion levels are derived from the Triangle Regional Model 2010 Base Year Model and are symbolized in Figure 2-17 based on volume-to-capacity ratios. The model represents the roadway network and traffic volumes as they were in 2010 and does not necessarily reflect the impact of intersections and railroad crossings on traffic congestion. Actual congestion near these locations may be greater than what is shown in the travel demand model. However, modeled traffic congestion provides systems-level insight into overall congestion issues and can indicate corridors that warrant higher levels of study and analysis.

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EXIST ING CONDITIONS

DRAFT

Table 2-5: Major R oadways

Roadway

AADTs (2013)

NCDOT Functional Classification1

Typical Cross-Section

Multimodal Features Multi-use paths and sidewalks

Davis Drive

21,000 to 28,000

Minor Arterial

4-lane median-divided

NC 147

12,000

Freeway

6-lane freeway

n/a

Town Hall Drive

4,400 to 4,600

Local

4-lane median-divided

Sidewalks

Church Street

6,900

Local

2-lane

Sidewalks

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road)

16,000 to 22,000

Principal Arterial

2-lane

Few sidewalks

I-40

149,000

Interstate

9-lane freeway

n/a

NW Cary Parkway

18,000 to 24,000

Minor Arterial

4-lane median divided

Morrisville Parkway

13,000 to 14,000

Major Collector

4-lane median-divided

Morrisville-Carpenter Road

10,000 to 16,000

Minor Arterial

2-lane

sidewalks

Aviation Parkway

14,000 to 29,000

Minor Arterial

2-lane

Few sidewalks and multi-use paths

Airport Boulevard

12,000 to 32,000

Minor Arterial

5-lane including center turn lane

Sidewalks

Perimeter Park Drive

4,900

Local

4-lane median-divided

Sidewalks

McCrimmon Parkway

7,700 to 15,000

Local

4-lane median divided

Sidewalks and multiuse paths

NC 540

22,000 to 40,000

Freeway

6-lane freeway

n/a

Sidewalks and wide outside lanes Sidewalks and multiuse paths

1

NCDOT categorizes streets and highways into functional classes based on the character of service they are intended to provide in serving the flow of traffic through the roadway network.

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DRAFT Figure 2-16: NCDOT 2013 Daily Traffic Volumes (Percent Trucks)

Map Produced September 2017

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EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-17: 2010 Modeled Roa dway Congestion

Map Produced September 2017

2-17 | P A G E

DRAFT Crash Statistics

From June 2013 to May 2016, almost 1,300 crashes were reported on state-maintained roadways within Morrisville’s jurisdiction. Of the 1,272 crashes, 7 resulted in fatalities or disabling injuries, 271 resulted in evident injuries or possible injuries, 987 resulted in property damage only, and injuries were unknown for 7. Rear end crashes accounted for nearly half of all the crashes. Angle crashes, left turn crashes, and sideswipes combined make up almost a third of the crashes in Morrisville. Figure 2-18 and Figure 2-19 depict the number of crashes by severity and by type. The 7 crashes resulting in fatalities or disabling injuries occurred between August 2014 and March 2016 and are further described in Table 2-6 and Figure 2-20. Table 2-6 : Crashes Resulting in Fatalities or Disabling Injuries

Location

Date

Time

Type

Severity

Morrisville-Carpenter Rd at Railroad Crossing near NC 54

8/29/2014

9:45 PM

RR Train, Engine

Fatal

I-40 WB near Airport Blvd

1/1/2015

5:22 AM

Fixed Object

Disabling Injury

I-40 WB near Airport Blvd

1/1/2015

5:23 AM

Rear End, Slow or Stop

Disabling Injury

NC 54 at Church St

4/28/2015

5:48 PM

Rear End, Slow or Stop

Disabling Injury

NC 54 at Carrington Mill Blvd

7/17/2015

10:24 PM

Bicyclist

Fatal

Morrisville-Carpenter Rd at Railroad Crossing near NC 54

11/14/2015

7:49 PM

RR Train, Engine

Fatal

3/8/2016

10:04 PM

Rear End, Slow or Stop

Fatal

I-40 WB near Airport Blvd

Crash rates for intersections are typically reported as the number of crashes per million entering vehicles (MEV) and are commonly calculated with the following equation: CRASH RATE =

1,000,000 x NUMBER OF CRASHES 365 x NUMBER OF YEARS x ENTERING AADT

Table 2-7 shows the crash rates for intersections in Morrisville where AADT data are available. Intersection crash rates are useful in gauging the relative safety of an intersection in comparison to other intersections in the study area. The crash rates are based on 2013 AADTs and 3-year crash data from June 2013 to May 2016. The average crash rate of studied intersections is 0.79 crashes per million entering vehicles. Despite an average entering AADT, the intersection of NC 54 and Morrisville-Carpenter Road has the highest crash rate, due to its higher than average number of crashes. Table 2-7: Intersection Crash Rates

Entering AADT

Number of Crashes

Crash Rate (per MEV)

NC 54 & Morrisville-Carpenter Rd

33,500

72

1.96

Davis Dr & Morrisville-Carpenter Rd

40,000

62

1.42

Davis Dr & McCrimmon Pkwy

33,850

49

1.32

NC 54 & Cary Pkwy

40,500

55

1.24

NC 54 & Morrisville Pkwy

27,500

36

1.20

NC 54 & Airport Blvd

24,000

23

0.88

Davis Dr & Morrisville Pkwy

37,050

32

0.79

I-40 NB Ramps & Airport Blvd

30,600

15

0.45

I-40 SB Ramps & Airport Blvd

40,550

9

0.20

Aviation Pkwy & Evans Rd

22,000

2

0.08

NC 540 WB Ramps & NC 54

27,400

1

0.03

NC 540 EB Ramps & NC 54

24,100

0

0.00

Intersection

2-18 | P A G E

EXIST ING CONDITIONS

DRAFT Figure 2-18: C rashes by Severity

75 Fatal (4)

196

Disabling Injury (3) Evident Injury Possible Injury No Injury Unknown (7)

987

Figure 2-19: C rashes by Type

Unknown RR Train, Engine Overturn/Rollover Pedestrian Parked Motor Vehicle Rear End, Turn Other Collision with Vehicle Pedalcyclist Head On Sideswipe, Opposite Direction Backing Up Other Non-Collision Right Turn, Different Roadways Right Turn, Same Roadway Movable Object Ran Off Road - Left Ran Off Road - Right Animal

Rear End, Slow or Stop Crashes Total: 603 Resulting in no injury: 490

Fixed Object Left Turn, Different Roadways Sideswipe, Same Direction Left Turn, Same Roadway Angle Rear End, Slow or Stop 0

20 Fatal

40

Disabling Injury

60 Evident Injury

80

100 Possible Injury

120 No Injury

140

160

180

200

Unknown

Figure 2-20: Timeline of Crashes Result ing in Fatalities or Disabling Injuries

AUGUST 29 9:45 PM

JUNE 2014

APRIL 28 5:48 PM

JANUARY 1 5:22 AM 5:23 AM

NOVEMBER 14 7:49 PM

JULY 17 10:24 PM

MAY 2016

MARCH 8 10:04 PM

2-19 | P A G E

DRAFT Pedestrian and Bicycle Network

Figure 2-21 shows Morrisville’s pedestrian and bicycle network. The network consists of sidewalks, multi-use paths (wide paths adjacent to roadways), greenways (paved trails not adjacent to roadways), and on-street bike facilities. The most recently available GIS for sidewalks in Morrisville is from 2014, so sidewalks constructed since then are not shown in Figure 2-21. The pedestrian and bicycle network includes two connected greenways. The Indian Creek Greenway is 1.8 miles in length and runs alongside Town Hall Drive from Morrisville-Carpenter Road to McCrimmon Parkway. The Shiloh Greenway is 1.7 miles in length and runs alongside and through a power easement from McCrimmon Parkway near Town Hall Drive north to Weaver Forest Way near NC 540. Additionally, construction on the Crabtree Creek and Hatcher Creek Greenways is anticipated to begin in 2017. The new greenways will provide an east-west connection through Morrisville from Lake Crabtree to the Town of Cary’s greenway system. Two North Carolina bicycle routes run through Morrisville: Mountains to Sea (NC Bike Route 2) and Carolina Connection (NC Bike Route 1). The Mountains to Sea route spans more than 700 miles from the Town of Murphy in the southwest part of the state to the Town of Manteo in the Outer Banks. In Morrisville, the route follows Morrisville-Carpenter Road, Church Street, Watkins Road, Perimeter Park Drive, and Airport Boulevard. Carolina Connection is also the North Carolina segment of US Bike Route 1, which runs from Florida to Maine. The bike route utilizes NW Cary Parkway in southeast Morrisville.

2-20 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-21: Pedestrian and Bicycle Network (2014)

Map Produced September 2017

2-21 | P A G E

DRAFT Public Transit

Morrisville’s residents have limited options when it comes to taking public transit. GoTriangle is the only transit service provider that connects directly to the Town. GoDurham and C-TRAN offer greater connectivity to residents traveling from Morrisville to adjacent locations, while WakeTRACS is an option for non-urbanized Wake County residents to travel to Morrisville.

GOTRIANGLE

GoTriangle is the transit service provider for the Triangle region, reaching as far as Mebane to the west and Zebulon to the east. Figure 2-22 and Table 2-8 present the GoTriangle routes that connect to Morrisville and their corresponding bus stops. These routes serve bus stops located in the northern part of Morrisville. Table 2-8 : GoTriangle R outes and St ops Serving Morrisville

Name RTP1 Shuttle North Raleigh-RTC2 Apex-RTC2 Raleigh-Airport-RTC2 Raleigh-RTC2 Cary-Raleigh 1 2

Bus Stops in Morrisville NC 54 at Shiloh Glenn Dr Copley Pkwy at Morrisville Outlets Factory Shops Dr at Morrisville Outlets 3015-3020 Carrington Mill Blvd Carrington Mill Blvd at Paramount Pkwy Paramount Pkwy at Time Warner Cable Paramount Parkway at Perimeter Park Dr

Research Triangle Park Regional Transit Center

GOCARY

GoCary, formerly known as C-TRAN, provides fixed route bus service along six routes in Cary. However, none of C-TRAN’s routes currently connect to Morrisville. Travelers wishing to ride the bus to Cary from Morrisville or vice versa must use GoTriangle RTC-Cary-Raleigh or transfer between GoTriangle and C-Tran routes.

GODURHAM

GoDurham provides transit service to Durham County via 15 bus routes. Taking the bus between Morrisville and Durham requires transferring from a GoTriangle route to a GoDurham route, to GoTriangle Durham-RTC, or to GoTriangle route DRX (Durham-Raleigh Express).

WAKETRACS

Wake Coordinated Transportation Services Transportation and Rural Access, otherwise known as WakeTRACS, provides demand-response transit service on weekdays to residents in non-urbanized Wake County. While WakeTRACS isn’t available to Morrisville residents, the demand-response transit service is available to visitors to Morrisville who live in non-urbanized Wake County.

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EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-22: GoTriangle Routes and Stops

Map Produced September 2017

2-23 | P A G E

DRAFT Railroads

The North Carolina Railroad Company (NCRR) Corridor runs through Morrisville along the west side of NC 54. Operated by Norfolk Southern, the NCRR Corridor connects Charlotte to Morehead City with several other cities in between including Durham and Raleigh. Amtrak also runs passenger rail service along this rail line, connecting Charlotte and Raleigh via the Piedmont and Charlotte, Raleigh, and New York City via the Carolinian. The United States Department of Transportation estimates that 12 trains travel through Morrisville between 6 AM and 6 PM and 4 trains travel through Morrisville between 6 PM and 6 AM on an average day. Six Amtrak trains travel through Morrisville on a typical day. Detailed in the Crash Statistics section, the most recent motor vehicle-train collision occurred in November 2015 at Morrisville-Carpenter Road near NC 54. There are five rail crossing locations in Morrisville, shown in Figure 2-23 and Table 2-9. Two are grade-separated, two are at-grade, and one is currently under construction to become a gradeseparated crossing. The grade separation of Morrisville Parkway under the new railroad bridge is anticipated to be completed in Fall 2016. The at-grade crossing on McCrimmon Parkway has been funded as part of the STIP and is anticipated to become grade-separated in 7 to 10 years. Table 2-9: Rail Crossing Locations

Location

Type

Crossing ID

NC 540 WB between Church St and NC 54

Grade-separated

929899U

NC 540 EB between Church St and NC 54

Grade-separated

946850E

McCrimmon Pkwy near NC 54

At-grade

734750N

Truss Builders Driveway (Private Crossing)

At-grade

Morrisville-Carpenter Rd near NC 54

At-grade

734753J

Grade-separated

904436A

Grade-separated

946853A

NW Cary Pkwy SB west of Village Market Pl

Grade-separated

929902A

NW Cary Pkwy NB west of Village Market Pl

Grade-separated

946854G

Morrisville Pkwy WB east of Crabtree Crossing Pkwy Morrisville Pkwy EB east of Crabtree Crossing Pkwy

2-24 | P A G E

EXIST ING

DRAFT

CONDITIONS

Figure 2-23: Ra il Crossings

Map Produced September 2017

2-25 | P A G E

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

INTRODUCTION The interest in creating “complete streets” continues to grow in Morrisville. The National Complete Streets Coalition defines a complete street as a street that enables all users (pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders) of all ages and abilities to safely move along and across a street. Roadways with lower travel speeds and greater access points (e.g. local streets and collectors) provide the greatest opportunities for developing complete streets. However, all functional classifications warrant consideration of multimodal users. Since the Town’s last transportation plan, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) has reaffirmed this approach through the development of Complete Streets Planning and Design Guidelines in 2012, and more recently in May 2014 through the development of expanded highway cross sections. The Roadways chapter directly links to the Active Travel Modes chapter to advance this complete street concept. Recommendations for the future multimodal system consider roadways at a corridor level and provide improvements for all travel modes along the corridor in a way that is compatible with surrounding land uses. The graphic below displays the topics considered when developing roadway recommendations for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update.

TOWN GROWTH Chapter 2 (Existing Conditions) describes the current conditions and needs of the region’s transportation network. While Morrisville’s population growth rate has slowed in more recent years, it still continues to outpace Wake County and the state as a whole, which is one of many indicators that the area will continue to be attractive for potential residents and employers. Projected population and employment growth has been documented within the regional travel demand model, which was run for the future year 2040. This run was performed with the existing transportation network in place, exclusive of those roadway projects that are currently committed or underway. This model run considers the transportation network as of 2010, which is the approved base year of the model. The map that results highlights the deficiencies that the transportation network will likely be facing from a congestion perspective in 2040. The Town’s and greater Triangle Region’s growth through 2040 has a dramatic effect on the roadway network. Without improvements to the network, corridors such as McCrimmon Parkway, NC 54, and Davis Drive will experience significant congestion. The plan’s roadway recommendations were developed in part to address these congestion needs and allow the roadway network to better serve Morrisville residents. Figure 3-1 on the following page displays the modeled congestion for year 2040 with no roadway improvements.

3-1 | P A G E

DRAFT Figure 3-1: 2040 Congestion with No Improve ments

Map Produced September 2017

3-2 | P A G E

ROADWAYS

DRAFT

COMMITTED ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS The State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) is North Carolina’s state and federally-mandated plan that identifies the funding levels, time periods, and project phases for transportation projects throughout the state. This list is updated regularly. The most recent version of the STIP as of the time of this writing (August 2017) was considered for this plan. Several roadway projects in the Town of Morrisville are slated for design, right-of-way acquisition, or construction funding during the life of the STIP. Table 3-1 lists the projects included in the STIP during the period between 2018-2027. The funding displayed in Table 3-1 is only the STIP funds allocated to the project, and does not reflect local funds that may be dedicated to these projects. In addition to leveraging federal and state funding, the Town of Morrisville aggressively looks for additional funding sources. These local funds are used to leverage larger state and federal funding amounts, to increase competitiveness for regional grant funding such as the Locally Administered Projects Program (LAPP), and to fully fund and implement projects locally. Recent success in obtaining local funding can be partially attributed to the $20 million bond referendum approved by citizens in the Town of Morrisville in 2012 to update the Morrisville Community Park, Morrisville Aquatics and Fitness Center, and to extend McCrimmon Parkway to Aviation Parkway at Evans Road. Figure 3-2 on the adjacent page shows the location of committed roadway projects in Morrisville. to update the Morrisville Community Park, Morrisville Aquatics and Fitness Center and

The roadway projects that are currently committed within the Town of Morrisville are projected to result in a beneficial reduction in congestion levels in the future. The regional travel demand model was updated to reflect the committed projects, and then run with 2040 population and employment growth included. Figure 3-3 shows the results of this model run. Notable congestion decreases can be seen along committed corridors such as Morrisville Carpenter Road, Aviation Parkway, McCrimmon Parkway, and NC 54. Table 3-1: Town of Morrisville Committed Roadway Projects

STIP ID

PROJECT NAME

FROM

TO

YEAR

FUNDING

U-5747A

McCrimmon Parkway Widening

Church Street

Davis Drive

2021

13,000,000

U-5750

NC 54 Widening

NC 540

Perimeter Park Drive

2021

$25,336.000

U-5747B

NC 54 & McCrimmon Grade Separation

n/a

n/a

2021

$20,702,000

U-5828

McCrimmon Parkway Extension

Airport Boulevard

Aviation Parkway

2018

$11,870,000

U-5811

Aviation Parkway Widening

NC 54

Interstate 40

2023

$28,787,000

U-5966

NC 147 Extension

NC 540

McCrimmon Parkway

2023

$57,850,000

U-5627

Louis Stephens Drive Extension

South of Little Drive

Poplar Pike Lane

2019

$3,036,000

NC 54

Davis Drive

2018

$11,000,000

n/a

n/a

2017

$85,750

U-5618 n/a

Morrisville Carpenter Road Widening Slater Road at Airport Boulevard Traffic Signal

Source: NCDOT State Transportation Improvement Program, Adopted August 2017

Other Relevant Committed Roadway Projects

In addition to the above projects that fall within Morrisville’s town limits, NCDOT has three projects along I-40 that will impact the Town. Interchange improvements at both Aviation Parkway and Airport Boulevard are scheduled to begin construction in 2018 and 2019, respectively. In addition, plans exist to widen the segment of Interstate 40 that lies between the Town of Morrisville and the Raleigh-Durham International Airport.

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DRAFT Figure 3-2: Committed R oadway Projects

Map Produced September 2017

3-4 | P A G E

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-3: 2040 Congestion with Const ruction of Committed Projects

Map Produced September 2017

3-5 | P A G E

DRAFT TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE The transportation system influences development patterns by dictating the fastest, most convenient, and safest routes of travel. Available travel modes also influence development patterns. People who desire daily services accessible by foot, bike, or public transit choose to live in different locations than people who prefer to drive to these destinations. As transportation corridors are improved and expanded, new development often follows. This push-pull relationship typically results in concentrated growth along major thoroughfares as residents seek to take advantage of the most convenient transportation facilities. When blended with a supportive policy and investment strategy, the transportation network can serve as an effective tool for guiding Town development. The relationship between urban form and transportation can be expressed in terms of density, diversity, design, and travel distance. The evaluation of these elements as part of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update contributed to the development of the Town’s transportation recommendations.

Density

A diversity of housing and travel options is beneficial to the community. Residential density and nonresidential intensity can look and feel quite different based on building form and neighborhood design. As in most Towns, location is the main factor in determining density and intensity. The area of Town closest to the Raleigh-Durham International Airport has typically developed at a lower density and intensity due to the airport overlay district restricting residential uses. Managing the location and magnitude of new density or intensity within the built environment helps planners determine infrastructure needs and implementation costs, and shifts impacts away from the environmentally sensitive areas.

Diversity

Mixed-use developments combine a variety of public amenities with compatible land uses, in turn creating places where people live, play, work, and shop. Mixed-use developments offer advantages over single-use developments by fostering a more efficient transportation system characterized by shorter trip lengths, more choice among modes, convenient access, and more internal trips. Recent developments such as Park West Village and Grace Park reflect the desire to accommodate mixeduse developments within the Town. The Town of Morrisville continues to work to identify and support preferred locations for these types of development.

Design

Urban design shapes the blocks, neighborhoods, and districts that organize the built environment and give the Town of Morrisville an identity. Elements of urban design provide a three-dimensional physical form to locally adopted comprehensive plans or zoning ordinances. Urban design connects people, places, and buildings. Some elements of urban design (e.g. street pattern, streetscaping, block size, parking, and landscaping) directly influence travel mode choice and travel behavior. These design elements generally vary with the context of the surrounding environment, and improvements need to be tailored to rural, suburban, and city and town environments.

Distance

The distance between the origin and destination is a primary factor (along with travel mode choice) for influencing travel behavior. The physical distance between complementary land uses in rural or suburban settings tends to promote automobile travel, particularly since safe, convenient facilities usually are not available for pedestrians and bicyclists. Denser mixed-use areas decrease the travel distance between complementary land uses and support transit, bicycle, and walking as viable alternatives to the automobile.

3-6 | P A G E

ROADWAYS

DRAFT CORRIDOR CHARACTERISTICS

As the Town’s economy expands and people continue to relocate here, the frequency and length of trips on existing roads will increase. This increase will make current delays worse and create new delays where none exist today. Understanding the system’s existing characteristics allows us to better anticipate future areas of concern. Once these areas are identified, establishing a set of transportation recommendations requires consideration of how the Town’s roads are classified and an understanding of how to balance the needs of multiple users along a given corridor.

Functional Classification (Street Hierarchy)

An effective roadway network must manage two competing demands: ·

Providing access to specific destinations

·

Offering mobility between centers

These two demands are inherently adversarial (e.g. increasing access typically limits mobility along the same corridor). Therefore, it is helpful to instill diversity into the network by providing easy access on some roads and protecting the mobility on others. Balancing access and mobility creates roadways that respond to the unique context and user groups along specific corridors. A functional classification system categorizes roadways based on characteristics such as speeds, vehicular capacities, and relationships with adjacent land utilizations. Federal funding programs use traditional roadway functional classification to help determine eligibility. For this reason among others, functional classification will always be necessary and should be consistently updated. Understanding a street’s place within the hierarchy of streets offers insight to help balance competing interests between design features, travel modes, and available right-of-way. The Town of Morrisville’s street hierarchy is made up of five classes: ·

Freeways

·

Major Thoroughfares

·

Minor Thoroughfares

·

Collector Streets

·

Local Streets

The following graphics and tables provide more detail about the street hierarchy. Figure 3-4 displays the future street hierarchy for roadways within the Town of Morrisville. The future street hierarchy reflects potential changes to the transportation network discussed in this chapter.

FREEWAYS · · ·

Controlled access Multi-lane roadways for higher speeds and longer distance travel Carry traffic through the Triangle region

Functional Classification

Freeway & Interstate

Local Examples

I-40 & NC 540

Number of Lanes

4+ travel lanes

Other Considerations

Partial or full access control, exclusive to motorized vehicular travel

MAJOR THOROUGHFARES · · ·

Controlled access Multi-lane roadways for higher speeds and longer distance travel Carry traffic through the Triangle region

Functional Classification

Principal/Minor Arterial

Local Examples

NC 54 & Aviation Parkway

Number of Lanes

4+ travel lanes

Other Considerations

Relatively high traffic volumes

3-7 | P A G E

DRAFT

MINOR THOROUGHFARES · · ·

Offer balance between providing local land access and moving people and goods Have lower travel speeds and traffic volumes than Major Thoroughfares Tend to be limited in width by the built environment they serve

Functional Classification

Minor Arterial

Local Examples

Town Hall Drive & Morrisville Parkway

Number of Lanes

2-4 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of lanes provided

COLLECTOR STREETS · · · ·

Connect neighborhood traffic to points within and between existing neighborhoods Balance mobility and access by supporting local development at the neighborhood level Primarily a conduit for local traffic during off-peak periods Often include slower travel speeds

Functional Classification

Collector

Local Examples

Church Street & Parkside Valley Drive

Number of Lanes

2-3 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of travel lanes provided

LOCAL STREETS · · ·

3-8 | P A G E

Local, slow-moving streets Can be urban, suburban, or rural Exclusive purpose is to provide block-level, local access, and safe connectivity to higher order streets

Functional Classification

Local

Local Examples

Downing Glen Drive

Number of Lanes

2-3 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of travel lanes provided

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-4: Future Street Hierarchy

Map Produced September 2017

3-9 | P A G E

DRAFT Street Design Guide

As recommendations are identified for the roadway network, it is important to consider their future design and function. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Plan Update attempts to do this by developing a series of standardized cross-sections based on those being used by the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) and NCDOT. Table 3-2 presents a context-based guide for the application of these standardized cross-sections in the Town of Morrisville. This table offers a greater understanding how street design can complement the land use context of a given area, which in turn offers an expression of consistency with stated NCDOT policy for design elements as well as Complete Street objectives. The table is organized around the Community Types derived from the region’s Connect 2045 scenario plan (Rural, Suburban, City & Town, Industrial, and Special). Understanding that categories “Industrial” and “Special” are limited locations that take on design characteristics of the other three categories, the table has been limited to Rural, Suburban, and City & Town. While there are always exceptions, establishing these standardized cross-sections and their appropriate context will be beneficial as future improvements or growth is considered in the Town. The illustrative cross-sections matching the Section ID column can be found in the Appendix. Table 3-2: Street Design Guide

Section ID

Suburban

2A

● ● ○ ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○

2B 2C 2D 2E 3A 4A 4B 4C 5A 6A

City & Town

○ ● ● ○ ○



Bike/Ped

Posted Speed

5’ Sidewalk

35 or less

5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Parking Both Sides, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Parking One Side, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Median, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Share the Road, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Median, Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

35-45

Median, 5' Sidewalk, Sidepath

35-45

Grass Median, 5' Bike Lanes, 5' Sidewalk

35-55

Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

35-45

Median, Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

55-70

Primary Cross-Section Secondary Cross-Section

RECOMMENDED THOROUGHFARE IMPROVEMENTS Recommendations along thoroughfares are grouped into three categories: ·

Roadway Widening

·

Access Management

·

New Location Construction

The recommendations in this section are intended to alleviate future congestion concerns by adding capacity through roadway widening or new location facilities and easing traffic flow through access management strategies. Table 3-3 lists improvements to the thoroughfare network, while Figure 3-5 displays recommended projects along with previously committed projects. More information on the recommendations can be found on individual project sheets in the Appendix. Table 3-3: Recommended Thoroughfare Improvements

CORRIDOR Airport Boulevard Access Management

TO Slater Rd

FROM Factory Shops Rd

IMPROVEMENT Access Management

LENGTH 0.25 mi

Airport Boulevard Access Management Airport Boulevard Extension Davis Drive Evans Road

Slater Rd NC 54 Wake Co Northern Limits Aviation Pkwy

McCrimmon Pkwy Current Terminus Southern Town Limits Weston Pkwy

Access Management New Location Widening Widening

0.74 mi 0.77 mi 4.60 mi 0.67 mi

International Drive Louis Stephens Drive

Southport Drive Poplar Pike Ln

Current Terminus McCrimmon Pkwy

Widening Widening

0.38 mi 1.23 mi

McCrimmon Parkway

Louis Stephens Dr

Davis Drive

Widening

0.38 mi

NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54

NW Cary Pkwy NW Maynard Rd Weston Pkwy NC 540

Weston Pkwy NW Cary Pkwy Perimeter Park Dr Northern Town Limits

Widening Widening Widening Widening

0.62 mi 1.15 mi 2.39 mi 0.35 mi

3-10 | P A G E

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-5: Recommended Thoroughfare Improvements

Map Produced September 2017

3-11 | P A G E

DRAFT INTERSECTION-LEVEL IMPROVEMENTS Recommendations for the future system include improvements to critical intersections and interchanges. These locations were identified due to operational deficiencies and safety concerns. More information about each improvement can be found in the Appendix. Additional details on intersection improvements will need to be determined through more in-depth safety and traffic analyses as the project progresses to design and construction. Table 3-4 includes the list of intersection-level improvements, while Figure 3-6 displays their locations. These recommendations are in addition to those already included as committed improvements. Although the grade separation at McCrimmon Parkway and NC 54 is shown in Figure 3-6, the project is currently committed. The project is shown for the purpose of reflecting a complete network but is not a recommendation deriving from this plan. Table 3-4: Intersect ion-Level Improvements

CORRIDOR

IMPROVEMENT

Davis Drive & Morrisville Carpenter

Intersection Improvements

Davis Drive & Morrisville Parkway

Intersection Improvements

NC 54 & Morrisville Parkway

Intersection Improvements

NC 54 & NW Cary Parkway

Intersection Improvements

Aviation Parkway & Evans Road

Intersection Improvements

Morrisville Carpenter Road & Town Hall Drive

Intersection Improvements

Morrisville Carpenter Road Grade Separation

Grade Separation

Davis Drive & McCrimmon Pkwy

Intersection Improvements

Airport Boulevard & NC 54

Grade Separation

Crabtree Crossing Parkway at Morrisville Parkway

Intersection Improvements

Town Hall Drive & Carolina Street Extension

Roundabout

Slater Road & Carrington Mill Boulevard

Intersection Improvements

3-12 | P A G E

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-6: Recommended Intersection-Level Improvements

Map Produced September 2017

3-13 | P A G E

DRAFT CONNECTIVITY ENHANCING PROJECTS Expanding Morrisville’s transportation system with an increased number of local and collector streets that connect to other collectors and thoroughfares will enhance travel for local residents. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update includes a series of recommendations that are primarily intended to address connectivity improvements.

Benefits of Connectivity

A more connected network can relay many benefits to local residents. ·

Improved options to avoid congested intersections.

·

Reduced reliance by local residents on major routes.

·

Integrated bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

·

Improved emergency response time.

·

Reduced traffic on existing roadways.

·

Fostered meaningful connections with local streets.

Recommended Roadway Extensions

Enhanced connectivity within Town of Morrisville primarily takes the form of roadway extensions. Within these roadway extensions, there are projects that may serve as attractors for future development, connections between existing neighborhoods, or other linkages between currently disconnected areas. Some of these projects may not respond meaningfully to the full roadway prioritization process, simply because they represent smaller connections. Many of these types of projects can be advanced or considered on a policy level, drawing on feedback from the Town’s Planning and Zoning Board and the Town Council. The roadway extensions being considered as a part of this plan include: ·

Crabtree Crossing Parkway Extension

·

Marcom Drive Extension

·

Fox Glove Drive Extension

·

Carolina Street Extension

·

International Drive Extension

·

Southport Drive Extension

·

Green Drive Extension

·

Millicent Way Extension

·

Stockton Gorge Road

·

Odyssey Drive Extension

These projects are displayed in Figure 3-7.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-7: Rec ommended Connectivity Enhancements

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT PROJECT PRIORITIZATION The assessment of roadway projects for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update includes both quantitative and qualitative metrics. The metrics used were defined using feedback received from Town staff, the Morrisville Planning and Zoning Board, CAMPO, and NCDOT. In addition, national resources such as Transportation for America’s The Innovative MPO and their Transportation Performance Measures: 2017 Survey were consulted to pull from national best practices. In addition to each metric, Town staff considered the importance of each metric to the prioritization process and how much weight each should carry. The following sections define each metric used in the prioritization process.

Relationship to Guiding Principles

At the outset of the planning process, the Town identified six guiding principles to help shape the direction and outcomes of the CTP Update. Those guiding principles are: Culture & Environment Enhance the Town’s quality of life by preserving and promoting its valued places and natural assets. Growth & Development Make travel more efficient by coordinating transportation investments with land use decisions. Safety & Security Promote a safe and secure transportation system by reducing crashes and improving emergency response. Economic Vitality Support the local economy by making it easier to move people and freight around and through the Town. Mobility & Accessibility Provide a balanced transportation system that makes it easier to walk, ride a bike, and take transit. System Preservation Improve the transportation system’s longevity by emphasizing maintenance and operational efficiency. During the development of prioritization criteria, the relationship to the plan’s guiding principles was closely considered. Each of the prioritization criteria identified responds to one or more guiding principles. The relationship between prioritization criteria and guiding principles is detailed below. Prioritization Criteria Crash History Existing Volume to Capacity Ratio Volume to Capacity Reduction Schools and Community Facilities Activity Centers Supports Transit Routes

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Applicable Guiding Principles

DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Quantitative Metrics CRASH HISTORY

To ensure that project recommendations best serve areas with existing safety concerns, crash data from June 2013 to May 2016 was analyzed relative to crash severity and frequency. Crash frequency includes a raw count of crashes along roadway project segments and within 300 ft. of intersection projects. The crash severity metric was calculated using NCDOT’s methodology that converts each crash to a “property damage only” equivalency. This is called the equivalent property damage only (EPDO) index, and gives greater weight to more severe crashes. The table below shows the coefficients used by NCDOT to weight crashes by severity.

Severity Description K A B C PDO

fatality incapacitating injury evident non-incapacitating injury injury not evident, but complaint of pain or lapse in consciousness property damage only = 76.8( + ) + 8.4( + ) + 1( )

Weight 76.8 76.8 8.4 8.4 1

EXISTING VOLUME TO CAPACITY RATIO

Existing volume-to-capacity ratios (V/C) were scored using the Locally Administered Projects Program (LAPP) methodology. The existing V/C for each linear project was obtained from the 2010 Triangle Regional Model and scaled using a point system. For new location roadways, parallel facilities that would be improved by the project were identified by Town staff, and the V/C of the parallel facility was used. The scoring system is defined below. V/C < 0.2

0.0 points

V/C < 0.4

0.2 points

V/C < 0.6

0.6 points

V/C < 0.8

0.8 points

V/C > 0.8

1.0 point

VOLUME TO CAPACITY REDUCTION

Each linear project is scored based on the volume-to-capacity reduction from year 2010 to 2040. V/C ratios for the existing year were obtained from the approved regional travel demand model (Triangle Regional Model v5) base year 2010 model network with 2040 socio-economic data, and future year V/C ratios were obtained from a 2040 full build-out model.

Qualitative Measures SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES Projects within ½ mile of schools and community facilities were awarded 1 point. Community facilities include parks, community centers, and greenway trailheads.

ACTIVITY CENTERS

Projects that serve an area designated as Business Activity Center, Neighborhood Activity Center, or Regional Activity Center in the Town’s existing zoning classifications were awarded 1 point.

SUPPORTS TRANSIT ROUTES

Projects that align with existing and proposed transit routes were awarded 1 point.

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DRAFT Prioritization Results

The outcomes of this prioritization process are reflected in Figure 3-8. It is important to note that the prioritized projects shown here are not financially constrained – this list is independent of potential revenues and should be used as a guide to help advocate for future funding. The prioritization process is intended to serve as a tool that allows for flexibility in the order in which projects are implemented. This flexibility allows funding partners such as the Town, NCDOT, and CAMPO to be opportunistic and to take advantage of future revenue as it becomes available. To this end, bicycle, pedestrian, and transit projects are not independently prioritized. Where these projects align with roadway projects, the Town should seek to implement bicycle, pedestrian, and transit improvements concurrent with roadway enhancements. This approach is most cost-effective and minimizes construction impacts to the surrounding network.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-8: Prioritization Results for Recommended Roadway Improve ments

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT STRATEGIC CORRIDORS The Town of Morrisville has been growing steadily in recent years, and continued growth is anticipated. The impact of future growth will affect services and reshape geographies. However, the Town’s most vulnerable asset very well may be one of the driving factors behind the growth – major transportation corridors. In the future, these roadways will serve as the backdrop for strategies associated with transportation, land use, urban design, and economic development. Profiles for five of the Town’s strategic corridors were designed to provide more detail for these important assets, including a deeper understanding of existing conditions and an assessment of growth and development along and adjacent to the corridors. This information helped shape potential solutions to ease congestion, increase safety, and reflect the vision and goals for a balanced transportation system. The five corridors shown on the next pages represent conditions found throughout the Town including typical roadway cross-sections, heavy traffic congestion, commercial development adjacent to the roadway, and potential for significant growth. As a result, the solutions illustrated in this section can be applied to other peer corridors that were not evaluated. By taking the proper steps now, these strategic corridors can support new growth, accommodate increases in traffic, and contribute to the success of the overall transportation system. For three of the strategic corridors, the linkage between land use and transportation was explored further in a scenario planning exercise. Town staff worked with the Town Council and Planning and Zoning Board to identify Town Hall Drive, McCrimmon Parkway, and NC 54 for inclusion in this exercise. Potential changes in growth patterns, densities, or intensities along each corridor were compared with the performance of a trend scenario to better understand how recommended transportation solutions would respond to these changes. Observations from this process are included in the strategic corridor writeups that follow. The scenario planning process is described in detail in the Appendix. Strategic corridor summaries have been prepared for McCrimmon Parkway, NC 54, Town Hall Drive, Airport Boulevard, and Morrisville Carpenter Road. Figure 3-9 shows the extents of these strategic corridor sections. These strategic corridor summaries include the following details:

·

Corridor Length and Federal Functional Classification

·

Existing (2010) and Projected (2040) Future Traffic Volumes (vehicles per day) and Congestion (volume to capacity ratio) – taken from Triangle Regional Model

·

Crash Summary – obtained from NCDOT crash statistics from June 2013 to May 2016

·

Priority Served – top three priorities served by the corridor, ranked by members of the public at Public Workshop #2 and by the Planning and Zoning Board

·

Existing Conditions – key observations, opportunities, and challenges currently facing the corridor

·

Recommendations – recommendations for the corridor, land use scenario planning observations, and supporting graphics

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-9: Strate gic Corridor Sections

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

McCrimmon Parkway Length

Functional Classification

1.72 Miles

Urban Minor Arterial

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 4,352 2040 – 19,470

Total Crashes Injury

29

Property Damage

124

Fatalities

1

Most Predominant

Congestion (v/c ratio)

2010 – 0.38

154

Rear End

Priority Served

2040 – 0.35

1. Congestion 2. Safety 3. Transit

Existing Conditions McCrimmon Parkway is in the midst of a significant change. With the extension of the roadway between NC 54 and Aviation Parkway this facility will provide a major connection through Morrisville. This extension will introduce opportunities for growth and also change the travel characteristics along the exiting section.

Recommendations The recommended cross-section for McCrimmon Parkway includes a roadway widening from 2- to 4- lanes divided by a median. The widening will include a grade separated intersection at NC 54 and McCrimmon Parkway. Scenario testing increased growth along the corridor, ultimately confirming the proposed cross-section, along with the need for multimodal connectivity. The roadway recommendations for McCrimmon Parkway are complemented by sidepaths on both sides of the roadway, accommodating both bicyclists and pedestrians. The grade separation at NC 54 and McCrimmon Parkway should include quality multimodal enhancements that continue the sidepath recommendation throughout the corridor.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-10: McC rimmon Parkway Strategic Corridor Recommendations

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

NC 54 Length

Functional Classification

2.39 Miles

Urban Principal Arterial

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 9,773

Total Crashes

2040 – 33,374

Injury

51

Property Damage

169

Fatalities

1

Most Predominant

Congestion (v/c ratio)

2010 – 1.07 2040 – 0.90

221

Rear End

Priority Served 1. Congestion 2. Safety 3. Transit

Existing Conditions NC 54 is one of the most heavily traveled routes in Morrisville, serving a mix of local and regional uses. Congestion issues along NC 54 have spurred the development of corridor and intersection-level studies to determine future improvements to the roadway. Upcoming development such as the Wake Tech Community College campus will encourage additional future growth. In addition, the proposed transit oriented development (TOD) along NC 54 will create a multimodal transportation hub.

Recommendations Within this section, NC 54 is recommended to be widened to 4 lanes, transitioning from 6 lanes on either end. The widening will include grade separations at McCrimmon Parkway, Airport Boulevard, and Morrisville Carpenter Road. It is recommended that the Town should consider conducting a full corridor study for NC 54 focused on access management options. A sidepath recommendation is included for the length of the corridor with a strategic tie-in to the Crabtree Hatcher Greenway. Scenario testing considered the addition of the identified TOD and development growth to determine the viability of the proposed cross-section.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-11: NC 54 Strategic Corridor Recommendations

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

Town Hall Drive Length

Functional Classification

1.77 Miles

Urban Collector

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 39 2040 – 3,997

Total Crashes Injury

3

Property Damage

24

Fatalities

0

Most Predominant

Congestion (v/c ratio)

2010 – 0.00 2040 – 0.10

27

Rear End

Priority Served 1. Transit 2. Walk 3. Appearance

Existing Conditions Town Hall Drive serves as the heart of the Town of Morrisville, with numerous civic uses, neighborhood connections, and multimodal accommodations. Town Hall Drive currently terminates at McCrimmon Parkway; however, a proposed extension to Town Hall Drive would connect the facility to NC 147. Proposed growth and improvements along this corridor will need to accommodate potential changes in travel patterns while remaining flexible to serve local needs.

Recommendations Recommendations for Town Hall Drive are centered around the Town Center Core Vision Plan, which aims to create a central gathering place for the larger Morrisville community. The site is planned to be anchored by various civic uses (Community Center, Library, Morrisville Town Hall) and the future Town Green. Scenario testing explored the impact of the Town Center Core, the Town Hall Drive extension, and continued mixed-use development growth along the corridor. Preliminary recommendations include a roundabout paired with a street extension at Carolina Street and shared lane markings down Town Hall Drive.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-12: Town Hall Drive Strategic Corridor Recommendations

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

Airport Boulevard Length

Functional Classification

1.26 Miles

Urban Minor Arterial

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 5,987 2040 – 26,812

Total Crashes Injury

6

Property Damage

26

Fatalities

0

Most Predominant

Congestion (v/c ratio)

2010 – 0.25 2040 – 0.57

32

Rear End

Priority Served 1. Congestion 2. Safety 3. Transit

Existing Conditions Airport Boulevard currently serves as one of Morrisville’s primary gateways from I-40. Airport Boulevard currently terminates at NC 54, with a small additional section near Davis Drive. This disconnect creates a convoluted travel pattern, negatively impacting roadways such as NC 54, Aviation Parkway, and McCrimmon Parkway.

Recommendations Recommendations for Airport Boulevard include a grade separation at NC 54 and an extension of the roadway to Town Hall Drive. This will lead to two new intersections at Town Hall Drive and Church Street. The construction of the new roadway may potentially include a phased process, Phase 1 – Town Hall Drive to Church Street and Phase 2 – NC 54 to Church Street. While it is preferable to create the full connection between NC 54 and Town Hall Drive, moving this project forward in phases still provides enhancements to local connectivity with reduced financial impacts. The new roadway extension will likely open the viability of the underdeveloped parcels between NC 54 and Town Hall Drive, opening opportunities for investment in and near the core of Morrisville.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-13: Airport Boulevard Strate gic Corridor Recommendations

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

Morrisville Carpenter Road Length

Functional Classification

0.55 Miles

Urban Minor Arterial

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 7,762 2040 – 17,535

Total Crashes Injury

29

Property Damage

101

Fatalities

1

Most Predominant

Congestion (v/c ratio)

2010 – 0.82 2040 – 0.56

131

Rear End

Priority Served 4. Congestion 5. Transit 6. Appearance

Existing Conditions Morrisville Carpenter Road provides a vital link through the heart of Morrisville, providing connections for local and regional traffic between NC 55 and I-40. The majority of the roadway in Morrisville is two lanes, but in many areas additional pavement has been provided for turn lanes into neighborhoods and commercial development. Pedestrian access along the roadway has been enhanced through mid-block crosswalks featuring rectangular rapid flash beacons that can be activated by pedestrians.

Recommendations Design plans for widening are underway for Morrisville Carpenter Road. A design plan for widening is currently underway. Key recommendations for this facility include improvements to intersections throughout the section. Changes in turning movements and access will be especially notable for the section of Morrisville Carpenter Road near NC 54. Bicycle and pedestrian accommodations are recommended to include wide outside travel lanes and 5-ft sidewalks on both sides. Special consideration should be given to connections to future greenways and the trailhead along Town Hall Drive.

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DRAFT

ROADWAYS

Figure 3-14: M orrisville Carpenter Road Strate gic C orridor Recommendations

Map Produced September 2017

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ALTERNATIVE

DRAFT

BENEFITS OF ACTIVE TRAVEL

TRAVEL MODES

INTRODUCTION Communities with successful transportation networks balance multimodal accommodations for different types of trips – recreational and utilitarian. In order to plan for multimodal elements that would enhance the Town’s overall livability, the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation

Health Benefits

Plan Update explores ways to enhance the existing transportation network to truly serve all community transportation users. This alternative travel focus embodies how local decisions can enhance the overall mobility and safety for bicyclists, pedestrians, and transit users. The plan for bicyclist, pedestrian, and transit recommendations coordinates closely with other elements, notably through an emphasis on projects tied to roadway recommendations presented in Chapter 3 and regional planning efforts through the Wake County Transit Plan.

Benefits of Active Travel Transportation Benefits

The option to bike, walk, or take transit is a key element to any healthy community’s transportation system. When an environment is conducive to active transportation, these modes offer a practical transportation choice that provides benefits for both individuals and their communities. The potential for increased walking, in particular, is large since 25% of all trips in the United States are less than one mile in length. Features that contribute to making transportation more active include a healthy mix of land uses, appropriately sized and located facilities, accessibility features such as curb

Environmental Benefits

ramps, buffers between vehicular and non-motorized modes, and transit shelters. Slowing traffic, reducing unnecessary exposure to vehicles, and incorporating active transportation features (i.e. signage, crosswalks, and adequate pedestrian phasing at signals) into future roadway design plans also enhance the viability of active travel in the Town. The bicycle, pedestrian, and transit recommendations in this chapter emphasize the creation of a functional active transportation network throughout the Town. This focus recognizes the variety of benefits of active transportation and how it contributes to the community. These benefits include:

Economic Benefits

·

Health benefits - Regular physical activity helps prevent or reduce the risk of a variety of

chronic diseases, obesity, and mental health problems such as depression. ·

Transportation benefits – Many streets carry more traffic than they were designed to handle,

resulting in congestion, wasted time, pollution, and driver frustration. Many of the trips that Americans make every day are short enough to be accomplished on foot or bike, and longer trips made by bus reduce the number of single occupancy vehicles. ·

Environmental benefits – Motor vehicles create substantial air pollution. According to the

EPA, transportation is responsible for nearly 80% of carbon monoxide emissions in the U.S.

Quality of Life Benefits

·

Economic benefits – Car ownership consumes a major portion of many family incomes. When

safe facilities are provided to walk, bike, and take transit, more people can rely on active travel and spend less on transportation, putting more money back into local economies. ·

Quality of life benefits – The availability of active travel in a community is an indicator of its

livability, which helps attract businesses and grow tourism-related activity. Providing bicycle, pedestrian, and transit facilities contributes to a healthy sense of identity and place. Social Justice Benefits

·

Social justice – For those without the option to drive, such as adolescents, elderly, those

unable to afford a car, and people with certain disabilities, these facilities provide travel choice and break down barriers to accessing jobs, health care, education, and recreation.

SIDEWALK NETWORK Walking is a key element to a healthy community’s transportation system. Every trip begins and ends as a walking trip, yet walking often remains a lower priority mode during the planning process. The availability of pedestrian facilities and amenities plays an important role in encouraging the use of alternative modes of travel to the automobile. The success of transit greatly depends on the functionality of pedestrian facilities and amenities. While this plan does not directly recommend standalone sidewalk projects, it is emphasized that all roadway projects in Chapter 3 adhere to complete street concepts and should include accommodations for pedestrians. However, as roadways are improved and developments are built the Town should continually strive to close gaps in the pedestrian network. For stand-alone sidewalk projects the Town should seek to maximize cost-effectiveness, including whether or not to provide curb and gutter as part of the project’s scope.

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DRAFT BICYCLE NETWORK The recommended bicycle network for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive

FACILITY TYPES

Transportation Plan Update includes a coordinated group of on- and off-street

Bike Lane

facilities. Connectivity between bicycle facilities and activity centers was an important consideration as recommendations were developed. The planning process also emphasized vetting previous plans with the updated roadway recommendations. The emphasis was necessary given the limited funds available for standalone bicycle and pedestrian projects. The facility recommendations shown in the maps on the pages that follow are coordinated with the roadway recommendations provided in Chapter 3.

On-Street Bicycle Facilities

On-street bicycle facilities planned for the Town of Morrisville include bike lanes, shared lane markings, and wide shoulders. Some of these treatments can be eligible for short-term implementation, while others require phased, long-term improvements ancillary to a roadway upgrade. The section below describes the recommended facility types that are shown on the following page.

BIKE LANES

Bike lanes are one way treatments that typically carry bicycle traffic in the same direction as adjacent motor vehicle traffic. Bike lanes are provided for the exclusive or preferential use of bicyclists on a roadway and are identified through signage, striping,

Paved Shoulder

and pavement markings. These lanes allow bicyclists of all skill levels to ride at comfortable speeds and encourage a position with the roadway where they are more likely to be seen by motorists. State and federal guidance should be referenced to handle areas where bicycle lanes may come into conflict with travel lanes such as around turn lanes or merge sections.

General Considerations ·

Bike lanes are preferred treatments for urban and suburban thoroughfares, and should be a minimum of five feet wide.

·

Lanes should provide a smooth riding surface and be free of debris.

·

Lanes should be provided on both sides of a two-way street.

·

Bike lanes are most appropriate on streets with higher traffic volumes and posted speeds of 30 mph or greater.

PAVED SHOULDERS

Paved shoulders are often found in less dense rural areas along roadways without curb and gutter. Paved shoulders may offer convenient access to nearby communities, particularly for more experienced recreational cyclists. Some of these roads may

Shared Lane Marking

eventually be reconstructed to include bike lanes, but if the road is not anticipated to be widened in the future, adding or improving striped shoulders may be a simpler bike accommodation.

General Considerations ·

Paved shoulders should be provided on both sides of the roadway.

·

Paved shoulders are not considered travel lanes, but can be occupied by disabled vehicles.

·

Absent of other facilities, paved shoulders will be shared with pedestrians.

SHARED LANE MARKINGS

Shared lane markings can help bicyclists position themselves appropriately in travel lanes and provide wayfinding. The signage and markings provide awareness to motorists of the likely presence of bicyclists and that they must share the road.

General Considerations ·

“Share the Road” signs do not indicate a bike route to motorists.

·

Shared lanes markings are best used on streets with constraints such as

·

limited rights-of way.

Source: FHWA Small Town and Rural Design Guide, Facilities for

Shared lane markings should not be used on roads with speed limits

Walking and Biking

above 35 mph. 4-2 | P A G E

ALTERNATIVE

DRAFT

TRAVEL MODES

Figure 4-1: Recommended On-Street Bicycle Facilities

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT Off-Street Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities

Multi-use path planning incorporates transportation, recreation, and health elements.

FACILITY TYPES

Depending on the community, multi-use paths are represented by a variety of forms

Greenway

and uses. Often, a well-connected system of multi-use paths is not utilized solely for recreational purposes, but offers pedestrians and bicyclists the option of using the facilities as commuter corridors. The Town of Morrisville has taken a proactive approach to the planning of multi-use paths through incorporation into the Parks and Recreation Master Plan to encourage non-motorized transportation throughout the Town and to the systems of adjoining municipalities. Multi-use paths provide a myriad of benefits to the Town: alternative transportation, health promotion, economic development, recreational opportunities, land and habitat conservation, and improved air and water quality. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update includes two variations of multi-use paths that will be designed to provide off-road trails that provide access to parks, neighborhoods, and commercial areas. For this plan, multi-use paths are classified as either a greenway or sidepath and are described below.

GREENWAY

Greenways are trails that are found in both urban and rural settings that are typically set aside for recreational use or environmental protection. These facilities are comfortable for both bicyclists and pedestrians to travel on. Sidepath

General Considerations ·

Greenways should provide a high level of comfort for both bicyclists and pedestrians.

·

Greenways can be used for commuting purposes of non-motorists if alignments are strategically placed in a community.

SIDEPATHS

Sidepaths are a type of multi-use facility that is physically separated from motorized vehicular traffic, but still within the roadway right-of-way. Sidepaths provide an extra level of comfort and safety to pedestrians and cyclists from roadways with higher travel speeds and vehicular volumes.

General Considerations ·

Careful consideration in design should be given to the degree of separation and driveway crossings.

·

The inclusion of sidepaths includes a wide roadside environment to provide the appropriate separation and pathway width.

NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTORS

Neighborhood connectors are similar in design and function to greenways or sidewalks, but provide connections to the primary trail system via short spurs. Neighborhood connectors may vary in width, and may take the form of a short greenway or sidewalk section.

General Considerations ·

Neighborhood connectors should follow ADA accessibility guidelines.

Source: FHWA Small Town and Rural Design Guide, Facilities for Walking and Biking

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ALTERNATIVE

DRAFT

TRAVEL MODES

Figure 4-2: Rec ommended Off -Street Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT MULTI-USE PATH DESIGN GUIDANCE

Figure 4-3: Connect 2045 Place Types

This matrix serves to link a variety of multi-use path features to the types of land uses that are present within the Town of Morrisville. The matrix correlates the place types in Connect 2045 with five roll-up categories to help streamline decision making regarding the choice of surface treatments, crossing types, and amenities for multi-use paths in the Town. The various features below can help enhance the character of a place and best serve the needs of users.

HIGH APPLICABILITY

MEDIUM APPLICABILITY

LOW APPLICABILITY

Table 4-1: Multi-Use Path Design Guidance Mat rix

CITY & TOWN COMMERCIAL SURFACE TREATMENT Asphalt Concrete Decorative Surface STRIPING AND MARKING Longitudinal PERPENDICULAR CROSSING TREATMENT Decorative Crosswalk High Visibility Crosswalk Standard Crosswalk LIGHTING Roadway Level Pedestrian Level AMENITIES Benches Bicycle Parking Waste Receptacles Dog Cleanup Stations

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CITY & TOWN RESIDENTIAL

SUBURBAN COMMERCIAL

SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL

RURAL

ALTERNATIVE TRAVEL MODES

DRAFT

PRIORITIZATION OF INDEPENDENT MULTI-USE PATH PROJECTS Identifying facility needs and improvement types is only one part of the recommendations development process. Given the existing and anticipated funding sources available for bicycle and pedestrian projects in the region, there is a possibility that all the projects recommended here may not be built within the next 30 years. The improvements in this plan were further analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative measures. A range of criteria were considered in the further analysis of the multi-use path network, including: ·

Connections to existing and proposed facilities

·

Activity centers served

·

Feasibility of construction

·

Funding partners

Independent multi-use paths are not grouped into near-term, mid-term, or long-term priorities. Rather, the four criteria for this assessment can be used as a guide to strategically advance projects, depending on the specific needs of the Town at that time. Table 4-2 shows the results of this prioritization exercise. Prioritization criteria are scored using a star system, with five stars indicating that the facility performs very well, and one star indicating that the facility does not perform well for that specific factor. The funding partners column indicates where the Town may be able to seek additional funding opportunities to advance certain multi-use paths. State and federal partners include NCDOT, CAMPO, and FHWA, while private partners typically include the development community or private grant opportunities.

Table 4-2: Prioritization of Independent Multi-Use Path Projects

Connectivity

Activity Centers Served

Feasibility of Construction

Funding Partners

Town Hall Drive Sidepath

Private

Sawmill Creek Greenway

State | Federal | Private

Morrisville Parkway Sidepath

State | Federal | Private

Airport Boulevard Sidepath

State | Federal | Private

Sorrells Grove Lake Greenway

Private

Mills Spring Greenway

State | Federal | Private

Fairview Greenway

State | Federal | Private

Green/Clements Drive Sidepath

Private

Park West Greenway Extension

Private

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DRAFT TRANSIT Like a complete system of roads, sidewalks, and bikeways, transit must provide connections to the places people need or want to go at a time when they need to get there. Potential riders are interested in transit service that is fast, frequent, dependable, and easy to use. As shown in Chapter 2, limited transit service in the Town of Morrisville is provided by GoTriangle.

Future Opportunities

The Town of Morrisville is at a unique crossroads that will require balancing many challenges and opportunities to best prepare for future transit expansion. The Wake County Transit Plan (adopted in December 2015) set the stage for a county-wide vision for transit service. This plan included an aggressive public outreach effort to gain feedback from citizens, and involved intensive participation by the county’s municipalities. In the November 2016 election, Wake County residents approved a one-half cent local sales tax to fund County-wide transit, advancing the recommendations of the Wake County Transit Plan. As part of this plan, the Town of Morrisville will be home to one of the planned stops for the Durham-Wake Commuter Rail planned to stretch from Garner to Duke University. Figure 4-4 shows existing transit services in the Town along with proposed future service discussed in the Wake County Transit Plan.

Source: Wake County Trans it Plan

FUTURE LOCAL SERVICE

Additionally, municipalities like Morrisville are eligible to apply for financial assistance through community funding areas. Community funding areas are eligible for matching funds that will be set aside to create or accelerate new or enhanced service. The current details of the program are still being developed, but it is paramount that the Town of Morrisville plans accordingly and stays involved in the decision-making process. It is recommended that once the program details have been finalized, the Town pursue a new plan that will study and identify the most viable local option for transit in Morrisville.

TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT (TOD)

In 2013, the Town of Morrisville completed a local area study creating an action plan for a future transit-oriented development and transit station at the intersection of McCrimmon Parkway and NC 54, following a 2011 resolution passed by Town Council strongly supporting the station. The McCrimmon Transit Small Area Plan provides a detailed action plan of the role the Town of Morrisville will need to play to provide the McCrimmon TOD. Continual support of the McCrimmon TOD offers many benefits for the Town of Morrisville including the creation of an important hub for regional transit via the Durham-Wake Commuter Rail, increased viability of local transit through community funding areas, improved connectivity to higher education at Wake Technical Community College, and creating an environment that supports quality mixed-use development. As enhanced transit service makes its way into Morrisville, a secondary TOD could also be considered east of NC 54 to further enhance connectivity to Wake Technical Community College. 4-8 | P A G E

ALTERNATIVE

DRAFT

TRAVEL MODES

Figure 4-4: Existing and Proposed Transit Service

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT

RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES

ACTION PLAN

INTRODUCTION The success of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update will hinge on the effective collaboration of local, regional and State officials to implement its projects and policies in a meaningful way. The recommendations in the plan build upon many historic and ongoing efforts by

Town of Morrisville

the Town to improve the transportation network through facility improvements, close coordination with agency partners, and Town policies. Completion of this plan represents an important step toward implementing multimodal improvements that affect travel safety, mobility, development patterns, and the aesthetics of the Town of Morrisville. This chapter lays out a simple set of recommendations to help local staff continue to focus their efforts and seek strategic opportunities to expedite the implementation of this plan.

Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

Responsible Agencies

To successfully implement this plan, responsible agencies have been identified that can influence and authorize recommendations. Some of the recommended improvements will be implemented at the local level through the development review process. Major infrastructure improvements most likely will be a product of State and federal funding; however, transportation improvement funds are limited and competition for them is great. The majority of responsibility for implementing these recommendations will be a coordinated effort between NCDOT, CAMPO, the Town of Morrisville, and private developers.

Funding Opportunities

With tight budgets constraining municipalities across the board, the funding to implement the North Carolina Department of Transportation

recommendations in the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update will likely come from a patchwork of local, State, and federal programs, as well as through the receipt of private contributions. The Town of Morrisville has taken the initiative to explore future funding options and their viability for the area through the Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding. The findings of this group and their implications for the Town are documented within this chapter.

Implementation

The core of the implementation strategy for this document is contained within the Action Plan, which lays out a concrete set of steps to implement the vision of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update. Through well-guided transportation and land use policies as well as leveraging strategic partnerships, each set of recommendations becomes a set of achievable goals with a basis in realistic expectations.

ACTION PLAN This section discusses the appropriate steps for local leaders to implement the recommendations of this plan and key agencies that should be involved with the task. It is not expected that all of the listed items would be completed over the next several years; however, the process should be initiated to best take advantage of the momentum gained with the development of this plan. Beyond the tasks listed below, it is vital to the success of this plan that the Town of Morrisville continues to work with and educate local citizens and businesses. While public support can encourage implementation, opposition can significantly delay a project. It will be important to encourage advocacy and maintain focus on those issues identified as important during preparation of the plan.

Policy Measures

Morrisville’s status as a desirable area for growth and development and as a major draw for regional traffic creates a tension between the needs of land use and transportation. The Town works closely with neighboring jurisdictions, CAMPO, and NCDOT to ensure that the integrity of transportation plans is maintained as development applications are considered. Town staff will continue to work cooperatively with these agency partners to review proposed development applications and seek reasonable alternatives where necessary. In an effort to carry this collaboration forward, copies of the adopted plan also should be forwarded to CAMPO, Wake County, NCDOT, and the Town of Cary. Additional copies should be made available for public review at Town offices.

5-1 | P A G E

DRAFT Before outlining a strategy for new policy and program recommendations, it is important to first reflect on the policies and programs that are already in place within the Town or are currently under development. An inventory of plans and policies with content relevant to the advancement of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update was performed as part of the information gathering phase of the plan development. This information is included in the Appendix. Table 5-1 documents the policies or programs that are currently being used to address transportation needs within the Town, or are currently under development. Table 5-1: Policies or Programs that a re Existing or Under Development

Element

Policies or Programs that are Existing or Under Development

Roadway

The Town of Morrisville is currently updating their TIA requirements. These requirements outline the level of traffic analysis and assessment required for different types and magnitudes of development. The Town of Morrisville is currently preparing a Townwide Strategic Plan. This plan is intended to assess current Town policies and practices and make recommendations on how to better coordinate, schedule, or collaborate on these efforts. The Town of Morrisville is currently preparing an update to their Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Recommendations made within the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update will be incorporated into this plan, which will then provide additional detail about future destinations and activities. The Comprehensive Transportation Plan is used as a tool to communicate desired roadway connectivity as development projects are proposed. New developments are required to reserve right-of-way for and construct future collector streets. Bicycle safety campaigns are conducted periodically as a collaborative effort between Town departments such as Planning, Fire, and Police. The Unified Development Ordinance specifies the provision of facilities such as bike lanes and sidewalks within new developments and connecting to adjacent facilities. The Unified Development Ordinance allows for the provision of offstreet neighborhood connectors. The Town has identified a Transit-Oriented Development District (TODD) as a zoning category within its Unified Development Ordinance, and has provided details for multimodal accommodation that will support future transit implementation. The Town is actively involved with the development and implementation of the Wake County Transit Plan.

General

Bicycle & Pedestrian

Roadway

Roadway Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Transit

Transit

The Town of Morrisville has been proactive in incorporating these key transportation considerations into its requirements, leading to a more connected and multimodal system. Moving forward, these efforts can be continued and augmented by considering the policy or program recommendations shown in Table 5-2.

5-2 | P A G E

ACTION PLAN

DRAFT

Table 5-2: Policy or Program Recommendations

Element

Policy or Program Recommendation

General

Town staff should consider whether adjustments are needed to the Unified Development Ordinance to accommodate recommendations in the Comprehensive Transportation Plan. Support efforts by partner agencies to promote intelligent transportation systems and transportation demand management improvements. Where appropriate, consider implementation of access management strategies for both public and private sector improvements.

Roadway

Roadway Roadway

Roadway

Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian

Bicycle, Pedestrian, & Transit Transit Transit

Review all development proposals for consistency with the approved collector street recommendations and emphasize network connectivity rather than specific alignments. Amend the Comprehensive Transportation Plan as necessary to include new streets as they are identified during the development review process. Continue to follow efforts promoting the Triangle Bikeway, and work with NCDOT to ensure proper connections to Town bike facilities on Airport Boulevard During road projects, enhance appropriate crossings to include marked crosswalks, pedestrian signal phasing, and ADA-compliant accessibility features Install rapid flashing beacons on all unsignalized greenway trail crossings or directional crossings as appropriate at major thoroughfares. Incorporate the streamlined nomenclature for multi-use paths described in Chapter 4 to other Town planning and engineering documents. Post informational signage to inform and educate the community about the purpose and rules of a sidepath, greenway, etc. Create wayfinding signage that details the trip length to community destinations by bike or on foot to encourage travelers to step outside their vehicle Following the completion of the Town’s Parks and Recreation Master Plan, revisit the non-motorized recommendations within the Comprehensive Transportation Plan to determine if adjustments should be made to better accommodate the vision of that plan. Update section 5.8 of the Unified Development Ordinance to specify the provision of supporting amenities for bicycle and pedestrian facilities that the Town desires within developments. Remain engaged with the identification and prioritization of transit improvements at the County level. Study potential routing, stop locations, ridership, and costs of a transit circulator with the intent to apply for funding through the Wake County Transit sales tax program.

Near Term Roadway Facility Improvements

Using the roadway prioritization process discussed in Chapter 3, a series of near, mid and long-term roadway improvements were identified. While the full list of recommendations can be found in that chapter, near-term improvements are also laid out in Table 5-3. Prioritization is an effective way to help guide the allocation of future resources. However, the ultimate timeline for implementing these improvements is subject to funding availability. Responsibility for implementing these improvements will be a blend of State, local, and private funding and management. Table 5-3: Near-Term Roadway Improvements

CORRIDOR Aviation Parkway & Evans Road Intersection Davis Drive

TO

FROM

IMPROVEMENT Intersection Improvements

Wake County Northern Limits

Southern Town Limits

Widening

Davis Drive & Morrisville Carpenter Road Intersection Davis Drive & Morrisville Parkway Intersection

LENGTH

4.60 mi

Intersection Improvements Intersection Improvements

NC 54

NW Cary Parkway

Weston Parkway

Widening

0.62 mi

NC 54

NW Maynard Road/

NW Cary Parkway

Widening

1.15 mi

NC 54 & Morrisville Parkway Intersection NC 54 & NW Cary Parkway Intersection

Intersection Improvements Intersection Improvements

5-3 | P A G E

DRAFT TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY With its location near the Research Triangle Park and many of the Triangle’s most significant travelways, the Town of Morrisville is in a unique position to be proactive when planning for and incorporating transportation technology. This section details current applications of transportation technology within the Town, as well as considerations for the incorporation of emerging transportation technology.

Current Efforts

The Town of Morrisville has numerous signalized intersections, which depending on their location are maintained either by the Town of Cary or by NCDOT. Funding has been awarded to the Town of Morrisville to develop a Townwide coordinated signal system. A coordinated signal system will allow for communication between the various signalized intersections within the Town. Signals along a corridor can be timed to maximize green time for drivers, and signal timing can be adjusted dynamically to adjust to crashes, congestion, or other changing conditions. The Town will be working closely with CAMPO as this coordinated signal system is developed by NCDOT. During this process, the Town should consider how best to manage the coordinated signal system upon its completion, potentially partnering with the Town of Cary. Residents and employees within the Town of Morrisville also can take advantage of transportation demand management programs that are active throughout the region. Strategies such as carpooling, vanpooling, flexible work hours, or telecommuting reduce the amount of single occupant vehicles on the road and help reduce congestion. The Town should continue to seek out opportunities to educate its citizens about the availability of these programs. Electric vehicles are already a part of the landscape within the Town of Morrisville. As this portion of the vehicle fleet continues to grow, communities will need to be intentional about providing charging stations at public facilities and with private development. The Town’s Unified Development Ordinance includes some considerations for the location and quantity of these charging stations. Moving forward, the Town should continue to explore adding detail to these considerations, including guidance on when private developers or the Town are responsible for installation.

Emerging Technology

While the impacts of some technological developments are limited to their field, there are others—like the printing press, the telephone, and the computer—that have the capacity to introduce a much more significant impact and transform the lifestyle of a generation. The introduction and advancements of connected and automated vehicles (CAV) is one such development. Connected vehicles are defined as vehicles equipped with technology for communication with other vehicles and roadside infrastructure. Autonomous vehicles are defined as vehicles that can perform driving functions without a driver at any time. As CAV advancements expand daily and are introduced into existing transportation systems, it becomes more challenging for agencies to prepare and plan for these advancements. CAV will introduce changes in the way states and local agencies implement transportation projects and future developments. Figure 5-1 captures a sampling of the opportunities and impacts that many agencies have recently identified with respect to CAV.

Figure 5-1: Opportunities and Impacts of CAV Technologies

With the development and introduction of CAV technologies, the infrastructure, investments, and planning to support CAV’s increasing presence will need to be thoroughly strategized for the future. Within each travel mode, there are potential strategies and challenges that can be considered now to help facilitate the eventual incorporation of CAV technologies. In many instances, these planning issues will need to be assessed at a regional level to make their implementation feasible. The Town of Morrisville can serve as an advocate to encourage the consideration of these issues. Future updates to the Comprehensive Transportation Plan should continue to update both the current state and future outlook for CAV and other emerging transportation technologies.

5-4 | P A G E

ACTION PLAN

DRAFT

Table 5-4: Near-Term Planning Issues for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CAV)

Travel Mode General Roadway

Roadway Roadway

Parking Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Transit Transit

Near-Term Planning Strategies Consider the future impacts of autonomous vehicles on land development and zoning bylaws. Consider design requirements to enhance detection equipment and controller equipment to collect and broadcast speed and safety information. Consider how to begin accommodating autonomous vehicles within a mixed vehicle fleet. Assess the safety and mobility impacts of providing two-way left turn lanes in a CAV setting. Consider the implications of converting on-street parking into pick up and drop off lanes. Consider impacts of greenway crossings at surface streets in a CAV setting. Consider the design impacts to bike lanes as autonomous vehicles are introduced into the fleet. Explore additional education and outreach programs designed for both bicyclists and motorists. Consider future impacts of potential design requirements to accommodate autonomous transit vehicles. Consider dynamic routing and agility in transit stops in response to realtime ridership needs.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES The construction of a comprehensive transportation network can occur through incremental adoption of local policies and initiatives supplemented by State and federal programs and assistance from the private sector. It will be important for the Town of Morrisville, in collaboration with Wake County and CAMPO, to continue pursuing funding resources to implement the recommendations of this plan. The Town of Morrisville has long understood this reality. Through the creation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding, the Town prepared a report exploring this issue. The report, finalized in December 2014, provided a review of potential transportation financing strategies and funding sources drawn from examples both locally and in other peer communities. The report then assessed the viability of these financing strategies and funding sources for use within the Town of Morrisville. The financing strategies and funding sources considered as a part of this study are identified and defined in Tables 5-5 and 5-6. Table 5-5 : Potent ial Transportation Financ ing Strategies

FINANCING STRATEGY

DEFINITION

General Obligation Bonds

Installment-Purchase Debt Revenue Bonds Tax Increment Debt Special Assessment Debt

A form of financing that generally has a lower interest rate than other municipal debt, is generally the only form of financing that requires a voter referendum, and is secured by the Town’s unlimited taxing power and full faith and credit. A form of financing that does not require voter approval (via referendum), and is secured by non-tax revenue or property. Secured by and paid for by user revenues, such as user fees or tolls on roadways. Secured by additional property tax revenue produced by private development. Also known as Tax Increment Financing. Financing secured by and paid for from assessments levied against private property.

Source: Town of Morrisville Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding Report, page i, December 2014.

5-5 | P A G E

DRAFT Table 5-6: Potent ial Transportat ion Funding Sources

FUNDING SOURCE Property Tax

Motor Vehicle License Fee

Powell Bill

Development Requirements

NCDOT STIP Funding CAMPO/Federal Funding CDBG Infrastructure Grants Local Sales Tax Special Assessments – Private Property

Impact Fees State Transportation Grants

Permits/Fees/Sales/Service

DEFINITION

The primary source of revenue for many municipalities and counties. Levied on private property, including land, buildings, and vehicles each year, and is based on the value of the private property. A fee charged each year when a resident registers a vehicle with the state. Funds, generated by the state gasoline tax, distributed by the state to municipalities to help fund transportation projects on municipally-maintained roads. Also known as State Aid to Municipalities funding. Requirements the Town places on new development to construct infrastructure to serve that development, including thoroughfare requirements from the adopted Transportation Plan. The traditional source of transportation funding in North Carolina for state roads – most of this funding comes from vehicle sales tax and state and federal gasoline tax revenues. These funds are generally distributed through competitive grant processes, and are generated from the federal budget. Provides some infrastructure to the Town for use in areas with low-to-moderate incomes. Levied by the county, and collected by the state, on purchases made within a county. Assessments levied on property to pay for public improvements benefitting that property with no related outside financing. Fees charged by some jurisdictions to fund certain public infrastructure and facilities. These fees are generally charged per unit. Miscellaneous funds distributed by the state to municipalities through a competitive grant process. Miscellaneous revenue generated by many different functions within the Town, such as facility rentals, recreation programs, development fees and privilege license taxes for businesses operation within the Town.

Source: Town of Morrisville Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding Report, page ii, December 2014.

Following the identification of these potential financing methodologies and funding sources, the Blue Ribbon Commission conducted an assessment of their viability within the Town of Morrisville. Financing methodologies and funding sources were assessed based on their performance against a series of evaluation criteria. These criteria included considerations such as sufficiency, timeliness, predictability, equity, suitability, and cost. Figure 5-2 is taken from the report and summarizes the findings of this assessment. Figure 5-2: Su mmary Evaluation Mat rix – Trans portation Financing Methodologies an d Funding S ources

Source: Town of Morrisville Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding, page iii, December 2014.

5-6 | P A G E

DRAFT

ACTION PLAN

For those financing methodologies and funding strategies deemed as viable candidates for application in the Town of Morrisville, the Blue Ribbon Commission considered the potential level of investment and recommended project types. Table 5-7 shows the outcome of this consideration. Table 5-7: Level of Investment Matrix

Financing Methods

FINANCING METHODOLOGIES AND FUNDING SOURCES General Obligation Bonds Installment-Purchase Debt Property Tax Motor Vehicle Registration Fee Powell Bill Development Requirements NCDOT STIP Funding CAMPO/Federal Funding CDBG Infrastructure Grants

Funding Sources

Local Sales Tax Special Assessments – Private Property Impact Fees State Transportation Grants

APPROXIMATE LEVEL OF INVESTMENT

RECOMMENDED TYPE(S) OF PROJECTS

$10,000,000+

New roads; major road widening

$1,000,000 - $5,000,000

Land acquisition; bike/ped

$0.01 generates $373,000 (FY 2015 est.) $15 generates $255,000 (FY 2015 est.)

Bond debt; maintenance; bike/ped; transit Maintenance; bike/ped; transit

$502,929 (FY 2015)

Maintenance; bike/ped

$2,274,000 (FY 2014 est.)

Thoroughfare improvements; bike/ped

2015-2025 draft STIP: $86,386,000

New roads; road widening; bike/ped; transit

Up to $5,000,000/project

Road widening; bike/ped; transit

$333,000 FY 16-FY 21

Bike/ped; small roadway projects

$3,810,000 (FY 2015 est.)

Bond debt; maintenance; bike/ped; transit

Unknown

Targeted improvements

Unknown

Capacity improvements

Unknown

Bike/ped; transit

Source: Town of Morrisville Blue Ribbon Commission on Transportation Funding, page iv, December 2014.

Going forward, the Town of Morrisville can look to the information generated in the Blue Ribbon Commission report as well as funding guidance provided by CAMPO and NCDOT to continue to assess how best to leverage and implement various transportation financing and funding strategies. Remaining nimble and open to considering different types of funding strategies will enable the Town to be opportunistic and to take advantage of funding as it becomes available. Taking this approach will help Morrisville continue to advance its transportation vision through the strategic advancement of projects, programs, and policies both now and into the future.

5-7 | P A G E

DRAFT

APPEND IX

STANDARDIZED CROSS-SECTIONS As recommendations are identified for the roadway network, it is important to consider their future design and function. The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Plan Update attempts to do this by developing a series of standardized cross-sections based on those being used by the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) and the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT). Table A1 presents a context-based guide for the application of these standardized cross-sections in the Town of Morrisville. This table offers a greater understanding how street design can complement the land use context of a given area, which in turn offers an expression of consistency with stated NCDOT policy for design elements as well as Complete Street objectives. The table is organized around the Community Types derived from the region’s Connect 2045 scenario plan (Rural, Suburban, City & Town, Industrial, and Special). Understanding that categories “Rural,” “Industrial,” and “Special” are limited locations that take on design characteristics of the other two categories, the table has been limited to Suburban and City & Town. While there are always exceptions, establishing these standardized cross-sections and their appropriate context will be beneficial as future improvements or growth is considered in the Town. Table A-1: Street Design Guide

Section ID

Suburban

2A

● ● ○ ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○

2B 2C 2D 2E 3A 4A 4B 4C 5A 6A

City & Town

○ ● ● ○ ○



Bike/Ped

Posted Speed

5’ Sidewalk

35 or less

5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Parking Both Sides, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Parking One Side, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Median, 5' Bike Lane, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Share the Road, 5' Sidewalk

25-45

Median, Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

35-45

Median, 5' Sidewalk, Sidepath

35-45

Grass Median, 5' Bike Lanes, 5' Sidewalk

35-55

Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

35-45

Median, Wide Outside Lanes, 5' Sidewalks

55-70

Primary Cross-Section Secondary Cross-Section

The pages that follow display the standardized cross-sections that have been developed for use within the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Plan Update. Specific dimensions have not been provided within the cross-sections. Coordination with the Town will be needed to determine the preferred details for each corridor, and their application within the Town’s existing and proposed roadway network. The Town’s standard cross-sections include curb and gutter. However, the Town may choose to proceed with curb and gutter on one side of the road with shoulder on the other side, such as in instances where the roadway parallels the railroad. A range of different bicycle and pedestrian accommodations are displayed in the cross-sections. Coordination with Chapter 4 of this document as well as with Town staff will be needed to determine the most appropriate bicycle and pedestrian accommodations for a corridor. When a sidepath is included on one or both sides of the road, it will take the place of a sidewalk in that location. The lane widths provided below are preferred by the Town. Narrower dimensions may be considered based on coordination with Town staff and are subject to approval by NCDOT. Similarly, the typical right-of-way dimensions may be influenced by the ownership, context, or function of the road.

A-1 | P A G E

DRAFT

A-2 | P A G E

DRAFT

APPEND IX

A-3 | P A G E

DRAFT

A-4 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

DRAFT

PROJECT SHEET DATA This page outlines further information about the data displayed in the following project sheets. Where applicable the data source, definitions, and process are described.

Traffic Volumes (VPD)

Traffic volumes for the project sheets were obtained from the regional travel demand model. Volumes for the year 2010 were obtained from the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Triangle Regional Model for the current 2010 base year. Traffic volumes for the year 2040 were obtained from a final run of the CTP network and considers the construction of the proposed project and the returned improvements.

Congestion (V/C Ratio)

Congestion values for the project sheets were obtained from the regional travel demand model. Congestion values for the year 2010 were obtained from the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Triangle Regional Model for the current 2010 base year. Anticipated congestion for the year 2040 was obtained from a final run of the CTP network and considers the construction of the proposed project and the returned improvements. Congestion is identified by using volume-tocapacity (V/C) ratios. V/C ratios are calculated by dividing the traffic volume of a roadway segment by the theoretical capacity of the roadway. Although V/C can be tied to level of service (LOS), V/C allows for a more specific analysis. The result is a universal quantitative measurement. The table below provides the V/C categories that were used in analyzing corridor improvements. CATEGORY Under Capacity V/C < 0.85 Approaching Capacity or At Capacity V/C = 0.85 to 1.0 Above Capacity V/C > 1.0

DESCRIPTION A roadway with a V/C less than 0.85 typically operates with efficiency and is not considered congested. As the V/C nears 1.0, the roadway is becoming more congested. A roadway approaching congestion may operate effectively during non-peak hours but be congested during peak travel periods. Roadways operating at capacity or slightly above capacity are heavily congested during peak periods and moderately congested during non-peak periods. A change in capacity due to incidents greatly impacts the travel flow on corridors operating within this V/C range.

Street Hierarchy

The street hierarchy reflects potential changes to the transportation network discussed in Chapter 3. Street hierarchy allows the Town to balance competing interests between design features, travel modes, and available rights-of-way. Definitions of each category are below.

FREEWAYS · · ·

Controlled access Multi-lane roadways for higher speeds and longer distance travel Carry traffic through the Triangle region

Functional Classification

Freeway & Interstate

Local Examples

I-40 & NC 540

Number of Lanes

4+ travel lanes

Other Considerations

Partial or full access control, exclusive to motorized vehicular travel

B-i | P A G E

DRAFT

MAJOR THOROUGHFARES · · ·

Controlled access Multi-lane roadways for higher speeds and longer distance travel Carry traffic through the Triangle region

Functional Classification

Principal/Minor Arterial

Local Examples

NC 54 & Aviation Parkway

Number of Lanes

4+ travel lanes

Other Considerations

Relatively high traffic volumes

MINOR THOROUGHFARES · · ·

Offer balance between providing local land access and moving people and goods Have lower travel speeds and traffic volumes than Major Thoroughfares Tend to be limited in width by the built environment they serve

Functional Classification

Minor Arterial

Local Examples

Town Hall Drive & Morrisville Parkway

Number of Lanes

2-4 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of lanes provided

COLLECTOR STREETS · · · ·

Connect neighborhood traffic to points within and between existing neighborhoods Balance mobility and access by supporting local development at the neighborhood level Primarily a conduit for local traffic during off-peak periods Often include slower travel speeds

Functional Classification

Collector

Local Examples

Church Street & Parkside Valley Drive

Number of Lanes

2-3 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of travel lanes provided

LOCAL STREETS · · ·

B-ii | P A G E

Local, slow-moving streets Can be urban, suburban, or rural Exclusive purpose is to provide block-level, local access, and safe connectivity to higher order streets

Functional Classification

Local

Local Examples

Downing Glen Drive

Number of Lanes

2-3 travel lanes

Other Considerations

Logical cap to number of travel lanes provided

DRAFT

PROJECT SHEETS

Planning Cost Estimates

Planning cost estimates were obtained using NCDOT’s per mile cost tables and approved methodology for long range planning. This method is to prepare planning level estimations only, and are subject to change as the project move into preliminary engineering, design, and delivery phases. Step 1: Multiply the proposed typical section by the total project length. Step 2: Add the costs for bicycle and pedestrian facilities, bridges, and grade separations. Step 3: Add the cost for water and sewer line relocations. Cost estimates are determined by multiplying the project length by the NCDOT provided costs per linear foot. Step 4: Sum the values for Steps 1-3 and multiply by 0.30 (30%). This is the NCDOT approved Miscellaneous Factor, added to reflect potential additional cost categories (e.g. historical preservation, archaeology, etc.) that may impact the project. This subtotal is the contract cost. Step 5: Multiply Step 4 by 15% on Federal funded projects and 10% on State funded projects. These values represent the engineering and contingency costs. Step 6: Apply the Terrain Adjustment Factor by multiplying the factor by the sum of Step 4 and Step 5. Morrisville falls within the Piedmont region, which has a Terrain Adjustment Factor of 1.15. This factor is added to account for additional project costs typically associated with topography, and differs for North Carolina’s mountain and coastal regions. This is the Construction Cost. Step 7: Apply NCDOT’s Right-of-Way “Rule of Thumb” calculation to include right-of-way costs equivalent to 40-50% of the project cost. This range was vetted through discussions with roadway design engineers with recent experience in the Town of Morrisville. Step 8: Sum the results of Step 6 and Step 7 to obtain an overall project cost. This is the value shown on the project sheets in Appendix B.

Crash History

To ensure that project recommendations best serve areas with existing safety concerns, crash data from June 2013 to May 2016 was analyzed relative to crash severity and frequency. Crash frequency includes a raw count of crashes along roadway project segments. The crash severity metric (EPDO Score) was calculated using NCDOT’s methodology that converts each crash to a “property damage only” equivalency. This is called the equivalent property damage only (EPDO) index, and gives greater weight to more severe crashes. The table below shows the coefficients used by NCDOT to weight crashes by severity.

Severity Description K A B C PDO

fatality incapacitating injury evident non-incapacitating injury injury not evident, but complaint of pain or lapse in consciousness property damage only = 76.8( + ) + 8.4( + ) + 1( )

Weight 76.8 76.8 8.4 8.4 1

Cross Section

Each project sheet has a cross section that is reflective of the specific roadway elements proposed as a part of that project. These specific cross sections were developed to be consistent with recommendations shown in Chapters 3 and 4, and by relying on past plans and coordination with NCDOT. The generalized cross sections shown in Appendix A were used as a reference point during this exercise.

B-iii | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

Airport Boulevard Extension

New Location and Grade Separation

Project Extents

Length

0.77 Miles

Phase 1: Church Street to

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Phase 2: NC 54 to Church Street

2010 – n/a 2040 – 28,971

Current Terminus in Cary

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2010 – n/a

Planning Cost Estimate Phase 1: $5,525,520

2040 – 0.63

Phase 2:$25,383,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

CROSS-SECTION

B-1 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

McCrimmon Parkway Widening

Project Extents

Length

0.38 Miles Traffic Volume (vpd)

2010 – 5,979

From: Louis Stephens Drive To: Davis Drive

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 14,930

Planning Cost Estimate $ 4,916,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.25

Total Crashes

3

EPDO Score

10.4

2040 – 0.46 CROSS-SECTION

B-2 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road) Widening

Project Extents

Length

1.15 Miles

From: NW Maynard Road To: NW Cary Parkway

Traffic Volume (vpd)

2010 – 19,714

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 27,867

Planning Cost Estimate $22,907,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 1.05

Total Crashes

27

EPDO Score

226.8

2040 – 1.5 CROSS-SECTION

B-3 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road) Widening

Length

Project Extents

0.62 Miles

From: NW Cary Parkway To: Weston Parkway

Traffic Volume (vpd)

2010 – 22,412

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 36,398

Planning Cost Estimate $7,822,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.96

Total Crashes

28

EPDO Score

193.2

2040 – 0.82 CROSS-SECTION

B-4 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road)

Widening

Project Extents

Length

2.39 Miles Traffic Volume (vpd)

2010 – 19,737

From: Weston Parkway To: Perimeter Park Drive

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 32,783

Planning Cost Estimate $30,519,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 1.05

Total Crashes

51

EPDO Score

489.4

2040 – 0.88 CROSS-SECTION

B-5 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

NC 54 (Chapel Hill Road)

Widening

Project Extents

Length

From: NC 540

0.5 Miles Traffic Volume (vpd)

2010 – 21,956

To: Northern Town Limits

Street Hierarchy Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 51,730

Planning Cost Estimate $10,302,000

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.60

Total Crashes

15

EPDO Score

120.4

2040 – 0.68 CROSS-SECTION

B-6 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

Davis Drive Widening

Project Extents

Length

4.60 Miles

From: Wake Co Northern Limits

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – 28,224

Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 36,607

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.71

Total Crashes

64

EPDO Score

606

To: Southern Town Limits

$62,595,000

2040 – 0.73 CROSS-SECTION

B-7 | P A G E

PROJECT SHEETS

International Drive

Widening and New Location

Project Extents

Length

From: Southport Drive

0.58

To: Morrisville East Connector

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – 12,557

Collector Street

2040 – 34,128

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.37

$5,495,000 Total Crashes

0

EPDO Score

0

2040 – 0.39 CROSS-SECTION

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PROJECT SHEETS

Louis Stephens Drive

Widening

Project Extents

Length

1.23 Miles

From: Poplar Pike Lane To: McCrimmon Parkway

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – n/a

Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 3,263

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – n/a

$15,252,000 Total Crashes

1

EPDO Score

8.4

2040 – 0.07 CROSS-SECTION

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PROJECT SHEETS

Airport Boulevard

Access Management

Project Extents

Length

0.25 Miles

From: Slater Road To: Factory Shops Road

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – 26,972

Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 41,374

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.69

$712,500 Total Crashes

15

EPDO Score

126

2040 – 1.06 CROSS-SECTION

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PROJECT SHEETS

Crabtree Crossing Parkway Extension

New Location

Project Extents

Length

0.31 Miles

From: Morrisville Carpenter Road

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – n/a

Collector Street

2040 – 2,426

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – n/a

To: Stardale Road

$8,524,000 Total Crashes

0

EPDO Score

0

2040 – n/a CROSS-SECTION

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PROJECT SHEETS

Airport Boulevard

Access Management

Project Extents

Length

0.74 Miles

From: Slater Road To: McCrimmon Parkway

Traffic Volume (vpd)

Street Hierarchy

2010 – 26,972

Major Thoroughfare

2040 – 41,374

Planning Cost Estimate

Congestion (v/c ratio)

Crash Summary (3 year totals)

2010 – 0.69

$1,953,000 Total Crashes

11

EPDO Score

92.4

2040 – 0.90 CROSS-SECTION

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ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

DRAFT

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PUBLIC OUTREACH SUMMARY Public outreach – whether through direct engagement or by input of community proxies – is an important part of a successful transportation plan. The two primary goals of engagement for the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update are to inform and engage the public.

Community Event Outreach at SpringFest May 14, 2016

INFORM

Town Council Work Sessions

ENGAGE

August 23, 2016 October 17, 2017

Planning and Zoning Board Work Sessions September 8, 2016 February 16, 2017 September 21, 2017

Informing the public requires the thoughtful translation of engineering and planning vernacular into common English. The initial step of informing the public is to communicate the purpose of the Transportation Plan and how it affects them. Once the public understands the value of the plan and its goals and objectives, they can then engage the planning process. Engaging the public necessitates empowering them to speak up paired with listening to their thoughts and opinions. Those who have the most to gain or lose from investments in the transportation system have perspectives that must be valued when developing project, policy, and

Town Council Plan Update Presentations February 28, 2017 August 22, 2017 September 19, 2017

program recommendations. The planning process included several avenues of public engagement to improve the likelihood that the feedback obtained was representative of the entire community.

Engagement Strategies

The Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update included a variety of strategies that intended to capture feedback from a cross-section of those who live, work, recreate, or have a

Public Workshops and Open Houses October 6, 2016 February 28, 2017 June 29, 2017 August 22, 2017

stake in the Plan’s recommendations. The engagement strategies included are shown to the left. The following sections provide details about information conveyed and the data collected using these engagement strategies. Presentations used at the listed Planning and Zoning Board and Town Council meetings are attached at the end of this Appendix. A summary of the public engagement process is also contained in Chapter 1.

Community Event Outreach at SpringFest

The Town of Morrisville Planning Department had a booth at SpringFest, held on May 14, 2016. Online Survey

Information was provided at this booth to introduce the update to Comprehensive Transportation

October to December 2016

Plan. In addition, attendees were asked to complete a short exercise intended to better understand their perception of existing conditions and vision for the future.

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DRAFT TRANSPORTATION IN MORRISVILLE TODAY Good Congested Roads Lack of Public Transportation Traffic Congested Busy Intersections Too much traffic congestion Bus Transportation Automobiles Traffic Traffic (Town Hall, MorrisvilleCarpenter, NC 54) Congestion All cars and Trucks More Traffic Bottle Neck Roads Morrisville-Carpenter Illustrations of bottleneck Remote Bottleneck Congested One Lane Slow Busy Beautiful McCrimmon Parkway at the tracks Disastrous!

MY VISION FOR THE FUTURE Expecting More Greenways Broader Roads Transportation to local Universities would be awesome Separate Bicycle lanes on Church St/54 Less Traffic More Lanes No Bus Depot or Train/Light Rail Station Light Rail to RTP & Downtown More green trails, more lanes Options Widening major roads Less Traffic Connected Trains, Trolleys, Trams, Walks Town of Morrisville will overcome it easily Widen Roads, Train Trestle Greenways!! Illustration of straighten alignment Star Network Expand Chapel Hill Road, not for buses, for cars Transit to RTP (so we can have one car) Greenways!!! Convenient Ease I'll like this place!! Under the tracks and 54 Wish you would stop approving apartment complexes/housing projects before making sure the roads are big enough

Town Council Work Session #1

The purpose of the first Town Council work session was to provide an overview of the planning process, discuss existing conditions, and to complete a series of interactive activities. Each activity is shown here along with a summary of comments received.

PRIORITY PYRAMID

Activity: Rank the guiding statements of the plan, with your highest priority at the top and your lowest priorities at the bottom.

Results:

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ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

THOUGHT CARDS Activity:

Results:

THOUGHT CARD RESULTS NC 54 Hwy NC 54 Hwy Airport Blvd Church to Davis Drive ID more road connection opportunities TOD Transit NC 54 Hwy Funding Bus Access to/along Church Street Greenway and Sidewalks 147 Toll Road Commuter Rail Station We need buses too small for budget to fund state road projects (communicating to public) McCrimmon Parkway Widen NC 54 Train and Rapid Transport Less pass thru traffic Crabtree Crossing an alternative to cars; bus routes safe bike and pedestrian connectivity more connections to parallel 54, Davis, 40

CATCH PHRASES

Activity: List key considerations that should be explored within each guiding statement.

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DRAFT Results:

Planning and Zoning Board Work Session #1

The purpose of the first Planning and Zoning Board Town Council work session was to provide an overview of the planning process, discuss existing conditions, and to complete a series of interactive activities. The activities mirrored those used in the first Town Council work session. Each activity is shown here along with a summary of comments received.

PRIORITY PYRAMID

Activity: Rank the guiding statements of the plan, with your highest priority at the top and your lowest priorities at the bottom. Results:

THOUGHT CARDS Activity:

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ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

Results:

THOUGHT CARD RESULTS there are no intersections on North Church Street to get to NC 54 There are no walk overs for pedestrians to cross NC 54 & the RR in the northern parts of town Through traffic is destroying the small town character of Morrisville Reducing congestion %/# of roads under state control is very high; don't seem to be high on State DOT priority list System Preservation - Perimeter Park Road Not enough alternatives to private (car) transport Hate share the lane bike routes not convinced there have been bus routes added great light rail plans; no idea when they will actually occur Not enough emphasis on alternative transportation more sidewalks completion of the greenway networks sidewalks on all streets and roads in Morrisville

CATCH PHRASES

Activity: List key considerations that should be explored within each guiding statement.

Online Survey Results

An online survey was developed and made available between October 2016 and December 2016. Notification of the public survey was made available on the Town of Morrisville’s website and social media, as well as at the October 6, 2016 public workshop and the October 17, 2016 town council work session. The online survey was prepared using the platform Wikimapping, a survey tool that enables respondents to provide input on community preferences, opinions, and issues for the various transportation modes. Participants also identified issues and potential solutions by placing icons on a map. Respondents were also given a chance to enter their email address. Those that provided this information were notified of future outreach opportunities for the plan. This section includes a summary of the results of the transportation improvement online survey. A total of 276 participants responded to the survey during the development of the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update. The results of the question-based portion of the survey are included first, followed by two maps that display the results of the map-based portion.

SURVEY QUESTION RESULTS

1. What is your relationship to Morrisville? (pick all that are applicable) a. I live in Morrisville b. I work or go to school in Morrisville c.

I recreate or shop in Morrisville

d. I travel through Morrisville

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DRAFT

I live in Morrisville 25.70% I work or go to school in Morrisville 32.20%

I recreate or shop in Morrisville I travel through Morrisville

86.50%

24.60%

2. Over the last five years, transportation in Morrisville has… (choose one) a. Significantly improved b. Slightly improved c.

Stayed the same

d. Slightly worsened e. Significantly worsened

Significantly improved Slightly improved

18.1%

Stayed the same

7.9% Slightly worsened

9.7%

64.1%

Significantly worsened

3. In general, what is the biggest transportation need in Morrisville? (pick one) a. Sidewalks b. Transit service c.

Bike facilities

d. Multi-use paths e. Roadways

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ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

DRAFT

5.7%

Sidewalks Transit service

11.9%

Bike facilites Multi-use paths Roadways

3.2%

3.2% 75.7%

Safety and Security 4. Which of the following is the most important to you? (choose one) a. Improving transportation safety at the Town’s most dangerous intersections b. Making the transportation network more reliable and travel times more predictable c.

Reducing emergency response times

d. Investing in smart transportation technologies

Improving transportation safety at the Town's most dangerous intersections

1.4% 6.5%

Making the transportation network more reliable and travel times more predictable Reducing emergency response times

23.1%

68.4%

Investing in smart transportation technologies

Mobility and Accessibility 5. Which of the following is most important to you? (choose one) a. Investing in bicycle-specific facilities (e.g. bicycle lanes) b. Investing in pedestrian-specific facilities (e.g. sidewalks and crosswalks) c.

Investing in multi-use facilities (e.g. greenways and multi-use paths)

d. Investing in public transportation (e.g. bus routes and bus stop amenities)

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DRAFT

Investing in bicycle-specific facilites (e.g. bicycle lanes)

10.5%

Investing in pedestrianspecific facilites (e.g. sidewalks and crosswalks)

27.1% 28.2%

Investing in multi-use facilites (e.g. greenways and multi-use paths)

32.6%

Investing in public transportation (e.g. bus routes and bus stop amenities) Economic Vitality 6. Economic growth in the study area should prioritize… (choose one) a. Housing opportunities for new arrivals b. Capturing an increased share of jobs c.

Striking a balance between housing and jobs

d. Promoting only modest growth

1.8%

Housing opportunities for new arrivals Capturing an increased share of jobs

6.8%

42.7%

Making it easier to travel between homes and jobs

47.8%

Strengthening regional connections

Land Use and Transportation 7. When planning transportation improvements, we should focus on… (choose one) a. Supporting economic development and job creation b. Increasing access to parks and natural resources c.

Making it easier to travel between homes and jobs

d. Strengthening regional connections

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ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

DRAFT

5.0%

Supporting economic development and job creation

10.8%

8.6%

Increasing access to parks and natural resources Making it easier to travel between homes and jobs

74.6%

Strengthening regional connections

Culture and Environment 8. When planning transportation improvements, we should focus on… (choose one) a. Design streets based on the land use and urban design features of the surrounding area b. Considering cultural features and amenities c.

Protecting the environment

d. Preserving existing neighborhoods e. Providing access to people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and physical abilities

Design streets based on the land use and urban design features of the surrounding area

11.5%

Considering cultural features and amenities

Protecting the environment

46.7%

17.0%

Preserving existing neighborhoods

Providing access to people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and physical abilites

20.6%

3.6%

System Preservation 9. Which of the following is most important to you? (choose one) a. Constructing a few important large projects (e.g. highways and bridges) b. Constructing numerous smaller projects (e.g. short street connections and bicycle and pedestrian facilities) c.

Enhancing travel within the Town

d. Focusing on ways to improve the conditions of our existing roads e. Focusing on building new roads

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DRAFT

Constructing a few important large projects (e.g. highways and bridges)

Constructing numerous smaller projects (e.g. short street connections and bicycle and pedestrian faciites)

16.6%

8.6% 15.9%

Enhancing travel around Town

34.7%

23.5%

Focusing on ways to improve the conditions of our existing roads

Focusing on building new roads

Thanks for your input! You have the option to answer these demographic questions to help us understand your input better. 10. What is your gender? a. Male b. Female c.

Prefer not to answer

0.7%

Male

45.4% Female

Prefer not to answer

11. What is your age? a. 19 years and under b. 20 to 34 years c.

35 to 54 years

d. 55 to 64 years e. 65 years and over

C-10 | P A G E

53.9%

ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

DRAFT

1.4% 6.5% 19 years and under 20 to 34 years

13.0%

9.0%

35 to 54 years 55 to 64 years 65 years and over

69.9%

12. What is your race? a. African American b. American Indian or Alaska Native c.

Asian

d. Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander e. White

African American

8.3%

American Indian or Alaska Native

25.0%

Asian Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

66.3%

White

SURVEY MAPPING INPUT

The online survey included an opportunity for respondents to select lines or points that represent transportation issues or opportunities. Once these facilities were mapped, respondents were given the opportunity to specify the travel mode and to leave comments. The instructions below are taken directly from the online survey. The maps on the following pages document the points and lines that were noted as part of the online survey.

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DRAFT

Online Survey Mapping Results – Point Features

Map Produced September 2017

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ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

Online Survey Ma pping Results – Line Features

Map Produced September 2017

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DRAFT Public Workshops and Open Houses

Gathering input from the public throughout the planning process is critical to understanding local needs, identifying projects of importance, and gaining buy-in to see projects progress from planning to implementation. Citizens recognize the strengths and shortcomings of their transportation system, and transportation decisions affect them daily. To fully utilize the knowledge of Morrisville residents, the project team conducted two public workshops and two public open houses. Meeting attendees were updated about the plan and encouraged to participate in the interactive activities.

PUBLIC WORKSHOP #1 – OCTOBER 6TH, 2016

The objective of the first public workshop was to educate the public about the Town of Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update and to obtain input regarding their priorities and goals, mobility issues, and desired routes and destinations. This workshop was promoted through flyers that were posted on the Town’s website and social media accounts. 11 people attended and participated in the workshop. This workshop was a drop-in session with several interactive activities. Activities used at this workshop mirrored those used in earlier Planning and Zoning Board and Town Council work sessions, as well as the SpringFest Community Event. Participants were provided with a handout to help guide them through the activities and to provide additional information on how to participate.

C-14 | P A G E

ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

One Word Exercise Results:

TRANSPORTATION IN MORRISVILLE TODAY Frustrating Hindered Disconnected Grid Lock Stuck Challenging Private Vehicles Private Vehicles Inefficient Bottleneck

MY VISION FOR THE FUTURE Options Sufficient Integrated Connectivity Accessible Connectivity Integrated Transit Transit Flowing Options

Priority Pyramid Results:

Thought Wall Results:

THOUGHT CARD RESULTS get traffic to slow down. Become more pedestrian friendly sidewalks all along Church Street Build roads big enough to facilitate the volume coming through at peak times being able to access places in Raleigh. My daughter goes to a magnet school; I can see someday a child take public transportation to school. close the town center walking loop need more road connections to enhance accessibility and movement across and through town McCrimmon & 54 need additional lanes and turn lanes Improve NC 54 Alleviate Congestion Congestion: additional lanes for peak travel time movements Connectivity - connecting all the segments of highways already constructed improve traffic congestion on 54 and Morrisville Carpenter Road Connect Town Hall Drive to Crabtree Crossing Parkway more greenways and bike path connections to get to work NC 54 is horribly congested more connectivity greenway or motorized Sidewalks everywhere safe cycling ADA stds for blind on greenways are good for bikes too Develop/Educate on traffic Route alternatives Don't penalize current residents by adding new increases to already overcrowded streets Make roads strong enough to support volume. Louis Stephens between Morrisville Carpenter and Breckenridge is a constant mess

Issues Identification

The issues identification exercise invited participants to record their feedback on issues and opportunities on a map. Scanned copies of these maps are included on the following pages.

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DRAFT

C-16 | P A G E

ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

C-17 | P A G E

DRAFT

C-18 | P A G E

ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

OPEN HOUSE #1 – FEBRUARY 28TH, 2017 The first open house event was structured to inform the public about the process of developing recommendations. Participants visited stations around the room to follow the “Roadway to Recommendations.” Stations included a series of exhibits showing the following information:

Public Outreach: ·

Results of the public input exercise from the first public workshop.

·

A map depicting the results of the online survey map component.

Previous Planning Efforts: ·

A map showing the summary findings from the Wake County Transit Plan.

·

Maps showing roadway, bicycle and pedestrian, and transit recommendations from the 2009 Morrisville Comprehensive Transportation Plan.

Existing Conditions: ·

Maps showing existing bicycle, pedestrian, and transit facilities within the Town.

·

A map with existing traffic volume levels within the Town.

·

A map with existing congestion levels within the town, based on 2010 congestion levels reflected in the Triangle Regional Model.

·

A figure showing information about crashes within the Town, including crash locations, crash severity, and crash types.

Next Steps: ·

Opportunity to speak with Town and consultant team members about the recommendations development process for the plan.

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DRAFT PUBLIC WORKSHOP #2 – JUNE 29TH, 2017

The second public workshop introduced members of the public to the preliminary recommendations for all modes of transportation, solicited feedback on prioritization metrics, and sought guidance in development of priorities for the key corridors. Draft versions of roadway, bicycle and pedestrian, and transit recommendations were displayed at this meeting for attendees to view and offer comments. 31 people attended this workshop. Participants were asked to participate in a prioritization exercise that sought to explore how different types of criteria should be weighted for roadway recommendations. Participants were also asked to provide their thoughts on recommendations for strategic corridors within the Town. Each of these activities and results are summarized in this section.

Roadway Project Prioritization Activity: Participants were shown a board with prioritization criteria for roadway projects, and their relationship to the guiding statements of the plan. This exercise asked participants to weigh in on which prioritization criteria they felt were the most important. Participants were given three dots to put on their top choices, with their number one choice noted in a different color. The Planning and Zoning Board was also given the chance to engage in this activity during a meeting in July 2017. Results from both groups are shown here.

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ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

DRAFT Results: PRIORITIZATION CRITERIA

PUBLIC PRIMARY

Crash History Existing Conditions Future Congestion Reduction Access to Schools and Community Facilities Access to Activity Centers Supports Bus Routes

1 9 4

2

WEIGHTED PERCENTAGE

PZB

SECONDARY 2 7 2 2 2

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

1

1

2

2

1 2

8% 33% 35% 3% 13% 7%

Strategic Corridors Activity: The information below was provided to participants to guide the strategic corridors exercise. Participants were asked to select a corridor, and then prioritize the key considerations for each corridor.

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DRAFT Results: RESPONDENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61

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CORRIDOR Aviation Parkway NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 Airport Boulevard NC 54 McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway McCrimmon Parkway Town Hall Drive Town Hall Drive NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 NC 54 Airport Boulevard Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway Aviation Parkway NC 54 Aviation Parkway Airport Boulevard Aviation Parkway NC 54 McCrimmon Parkway Town Hall Drive Town Hall Drive McCrimmon Parkway NC 54 Aviation Parkway Airport Boulevard Town Hall Drive McCrimmon Parkway Airport Boulevard Aviation Parkway NC 54 NC 54 Aviation Parkway Airport Boulevard Town Hall Drive McCrimmon Parkway Town Hall Drive McCrimmon Parkway NC 54 Aviation Parkway Airport Boulevard

PRIORITY 1

PRIORITY 2

PRIORITY 3

Congestion Congestion Congestion Safety Congestion Safety Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Transit Walk Congestion Congestion Walk Congestion Walk Congestion Congestion Transit Safety Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Safety Congestion Congestion Safety Bike Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Congestion Walk Appearance Congestion Congestion Congestion Appearance Transit Walk Congestion Congestion Congestion Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety

Transit Safety Transit Congestion Safety Walk Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Congestion Appearance Bike Bike Bike Transit Congestion Safety Safety Congestion Congestion Walk Bike Bike Safety Transit Safety Congestion Transit Safety Bike Transit Bike Transit Walk Safety Safety Safety Safety Congestion Safety Safety Safety Safety Safety Walk Transit Transit Walk Walk Congestion Transit Congestion Walk Congestion Walk Congestion Appearance Walk Congestion

Appearance Bike Bike Transit Transit Congestion Bike Transit Bike Transit Transit Appearance Bike Walk Safety Safety Bike Transit Walk Bike Bike Transit Bike Walk Safety Transit Bike Transit Transit Appearance Transit Congestion Congestion Safety Bike Bike Appearance Appearance Appearance Walk Appearance Transit Transit Transit Appearance Congestion Congestion Congestion Safety Transit Transit Transit Congestion Transit Appearance Transit Appearance Transit Walk Transit Appearance

ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

Public Comments

Attendees were encouraged to also provide written comments if they had specific items they wished to discuss. The written comments received as part of this workshop are included below.

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DRAFT OPEN HOUSE #2 – AUGUST 22ND, 2017

The final open house meeting focused on displaying draft multimodal recommendations and the results of the prioritization process. Attendees were invited to provide comments about the content of the mapping and to interact with Town and consultant team members. Comments related to the content of the open house were received before, during, and after the meeting. These comments have been scanned in and are included on the following pages.

Written Comments

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ENGAGEMENT

DRAFT

SUMMARY

C-25 | P A G E

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