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FEBRUARY 9, 2018

The business journal serving Central Iowa’s Cultivation Corridor

Price: $1.75

MICHELLE HILL director, Waukee APEX

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EDGE State, schools seek apex in training for STEM workers

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LEADING THE BIOECONOMY CULTIVATION CORRIDOR ® WELCOMES WENDY WINTERSTEEN 16TH PRESIDENT OF IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Consistent with the Cultivation Corridor®’s tagline, “It’s in our DNA”, agriculture is rooted in President Wintersteen’s DNA. The daughter of farmers and educators, Wintersteen built a career at Iowa State University that spans nearly four decades, beginning as an extension specialist in integrated pest management. She later became a professor of entomology, and then went on to hold a series of administrative roles in ISU Extension and Outreach and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For the past eleven years, Wintersteen has served as Endowed Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) and director of the Iowa Agriculture Experiment Station, leading both to national and global prominence. In her role as President of Iowa State University, Wintersteen brings rich experience leading innovation and excellence, and building robust, collaborative relationships; she is uniquely positioned to move the Cultivation Corridor®’s strong momentum forward as the premier destination for the agbioscience and technology sectors.

“With the right infrastructure and mechanisms in place, such as what’s evolving at the Iowa State University Research Park and within the Office of Economic Development and Industry Relations, we can support more of our faculty, staff, and students in moving groundbreaking science and innovation from the research lab to the market place. This will elevate Iowa as the place to create quality jobs, grow the economy, and ultimately fulfill the Corridor’s mission to feed and fuel the world.”

Business Record | February 9, 2018

WENDY WINTERSTEEN, President, Iowa State University

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“Wendy Wintersteen is the right person at the right time for the Cultivation Corridor®, Iowa State and the State of Iowa. Her experience and expertise in bioscience will provide the foundation for a surge in transforming university research into applications that benefit Iowans and create high-level jobs across various bioscience platforms. We welcome President Wintersteen. We have exciting opportunities ahead!”

“This is an important step forward for the Corridor. President Wintersteen brings a wealth of knowledge of the five sectors that comprise the Cultivation Corridor®’s worldrenowned bioeconomy: agbioscience, agtechnology, biorenewables, plant sciences, and advanced manufacturing. If you want to be on the leading edge of Agriculture and Agbioscience, you need to be in the Cultivation Corridor®.”

CHARLES SUKUP, President, Sukup Manufacturing Co.

GAGE KENT, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Kent Corporation

Culttivva t ionCo rrr id dor. org g

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TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 36 | NUMBER 6 | FEBRUARY 9, 2018

LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Chris Conetzkey (515) 661-6081 [email protected]

EDITORIAL EDITOR Suzanne Behnke (515) 661-6085 [email protected]

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CONTACT US (515) 288-3336 [email protected]

MANAGING EDITOR Perry Beeman (515) 661-6086 [email protected] Beats: Economic Development | Transportation | Tech & Innovation | Energy & Environment SENIOR STAFF WRITERS Joe Gardyasz (515) 661-6084 [email protected] Beats: Insurance & Investments | Health & Wellness | Manufacturing & Logistics | HR & Education

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Kent Darr (515) 661-6083 [email protected] Beats: Real Estate & Development | Banking & Finance | Law & Government NEWSROOM OPERATIONS MANAGER John Retzlaff (515) 661-6082 [email protected] Calendar | On the Moves COPY EDITOR Kurt Helland

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PARTNERSHIP EXCEEDS GOALS

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MUSIC EXEC JOINS DRAKE BOARD

ART & PRODUCTION SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brianna Schechinger GRAPHIC DESIGNER II Lauren Hayes GRAPHIC DESIGNER Sami Schrader PHOTOGRAPHER Duane Tinkey

SALES DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Sara Brown DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS Katherine Harrington SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Lori Bratrud Maria Davis

TWEETS FROM THE BRAVO AWARDS GALA

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GOVERNOR DISPLAYS ART BY WOMEN

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BRENT WILLETT Take a closer look at the new president and CEO of the Iowa Health Care Association.

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COVER STORY: STEM: LOOKING FOR AN EDGE

Your first look at upcoming events

There’s a statewide effort to make sure students know that four-year college or university degrees aren’t their only options.

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DO THE MATH ON WATER QUALITY The Elbert Files: By Dave Elbert

WAREHOUSE WORK

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Craig Fritzjunker is creating a unique blend of office space in a former warehouse.

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CALENDAR PICKS

A TALE OF TWO REACTIONS Marketing: By Drew McLellan

CIWEEK ciWeek9, running March 5-8 this year, is all about inspiration and innovation.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Laura Stapes

WHO’S IN THIS ISSUE? A list of local people and the page number of the article in which they are mentioned.

ADMINISTRATION BPC VICE PRESIDENT Jason Swanson BUSINESS MANAGER Eileen Jackson ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST Becky Hotchkiss OFFICE MANAGER Laura Stegemann INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE Alison Damon BPC CHAIRMAN Connie Wimer BPC PRESIDENT Janette Larkin Business Record® (USPS 154-740, ISSN 1068-6681) is published by Business Publications Corporation Inc., The Depot at Fourth, 100-4th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309, (515) 288-3336. Contents © 2018 Business Record. Published weekly. Annual subscriptions $69.95. Single copy price is $1.75. Copies of past issues, as available, may be purchased for $4.50 each. Periodicals Postage Paid at Des Moines, Iowa. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Business Publications, The Depot at Fourth, 100-4th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309.

Kristopher Byam, 8 Jay Byers, 4 Jake Christensen, 4 Lawrence Cunningham, 4 Andre DeLong, 12 Craig Fritzjunker, 12 Michelle Hill, 8 Chad Houston, 8 Dan Houston, 4

Veronica O’Hern, 4 Mike Ralston, 8 Carrie Rankin, 8 Kim Reynolds, 4, 8 Bill Stowe, 31 Georgia Van Gundy, 8 Brent Willett, 6

INSIDE THIS ISSUE BUSINESS RECORD IOWA A SHARED IDENTITY Eastern Iowa unites to create Creative Corridor

February 2018

CORRECTION An incorrect photo of Kevin Mortensen, brand engagement specialist of the Iowa Clinic, ran in the Feb. 2 Business Record. This is the correct photo.

A SHARED IDENTITY Eastern Iowa unites to create Creative Corridor JENN BLEIL

CINDY DIETZ

DAVID BYWATER

JEANINE PENTICOFF

Learning and Development Manager, Van Meter Inc.

Director, Business Communications; Rockwell Collins

President, Bankers Advertising/Tru Art

Vice President, Alliant Energy

Business Record | February 9, 2018

PROJECT COORDINATOR Kolbie Creger

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THE INSIDER

notebook Bits and bites of the finer side of Iowa business

CHRIS CONETZKEY publisher

SUZANNE BEHNKE editor

#seeDSMsayBravo

Partnership exceeds goals

BY SUZANNE BEHNKE

BY PERRY BEEMAN

The Feb. 4 Bravo Awards Gala attracted more than 1,000 attendees dressed in their finest to celebrate the arts and culture of Greater Des Moines. Here are some of the comments on social media that capture the event, which honored the Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden, Pyramid Theatre Co. and Business Publications Corp. Chairman Connie Wimer. Check #seeDSMsayBravo for more.

Greater Des Moines Partnership Chairman Dan Houston took time to debrief me on his year at the helm of one of the area’s biggest and most powerful economic development groups. In the course of the conversation, he noted that the Partnership sets some very specific goals each year. And in four key categories, those goals were exceeded in 2017. Goal: See 20 businesses expand. Result: 23 did. Goal: Lure 10 new companies to the area. Result: 11. Goal: $225 million capital investment. Result: $1.1 billion was invested. Goal: Create or retain 2,250 jobs. Result: 2,689. In addition, the Partnership added 60 investors, for a total of 320. Said Houston, the top boss at Principal Financial Group: “When I step back and ask what are we trying to accomplish, economic development is number one. If you look at the actual results, consistently we hit our goals right after another. I challenge anyone to go out and look at other sites and see if they are getting the same kind of traction. That, of course, is what the board is looking at when they evaluate (CEO) Jay (Byers) and (President) Gene (Meyer) and the crew here. “There is a mix of things, planting seeds that aren’t going to be harvested for three to five or 10 years down the road,” Houston said. “I don’t want to say we are the epicenter of the first data center, but all of a sudden you are getting a reputation,” Houston said. “You are getting more than a hard look. You are getting hard decisions. People are signing on. You have the crossroads of the interstates. The crossroads of the fiber optic network. You have low-cost energy, low-cost land. You have water. We have a story to tell our shareholders with an environmentally friendly market with that industry.” Partnership CEO Jay Byers said the organization has tracked economic development goals and achievements since it was formed in 1999. Houston said the DSM USA identity deployed by the Partnership in 2017 tells prospective businesses that they won’t have cities in this area fighting, which helps add to that development record. “They won’t just get the workers in one county. We have a very collaborative set of chambers, cities and counties, trying to collectively come together to accomplish great things,” Houston said. Byers said the DSM USA tag also suggests the area is hip and globally oriented, according to research conducted during the rebranding.

@CapitalXRoads: Congratulations to @dm_ garden Pyramid Theatre Company and Connie Wimer for receiving awards at Saturday’s @ BravoGreaterDSM Awards Gala. You all are doing great things to support #culturalcapital in #DSMUSA! #seeDSMsayBravo @SteveCarlson: Congrats to @wellsfargo leader Mary Coffin and @principal’s Nora Everett, the first women to chair the @BravoGreaterDSM Gala Saturday. More than 1,500 people gathered to support #arts and #culture organizations in #DSMUSA . . . and to dance! @JoeMurphyDSM: Great celebrating the arts in #DSMUSA last night. Critical piece to economic development in the region! And you can’t have a social media list without the Greater Des Moines Partnership’s @JayByers: #BravoDSM Awards Gala this PM. Congrats to all honorees! In 2018, more than $4M will be granted to more than 90 #arts & #culture orgs in #DSMUSA!

Indie music executive joins Drake’s board of trustees

PERRY BEEMAN managing editor

KENT DARR senior staff writer

JOE GARDYASZ senior staff writer

In case you missed it... A brief look back at news from the past week on BusinessRecord.com

Forty Under 40 list This year’s Forty Under 40 honorees have been announced. See how many you know, and prepare to meet the rest. http://bit.ly/2Eul0sD

UI minority enrollment up The University of Iowa’s minority enrollment is up, but work remains, a study found. http://bit.ly/2Gzh76i

‘A very good year for Principal’ — with added tax benefits Principal Financial Group had record net income of $2.3 billion in 2017, including $625.6 million in benefits from tax reform. http://bit.ly/2E3ETJc

Harty rises at Meredith Meredith Corp. promoted Tom Harty to president and CEO, with Steve Lacy moving to executive chairman. http://bit.ly/2nyrluU

Takeaways about the economy We break down some of the key messages from our 2018 Economic Forecast panel. http://bit.ly/2BJKgYE

Business Record | February 9, 2018

BY JOE GARDYASZ

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Drake University’s newest trustee is a leader in the music management industry. Jonathan Azu, a 1999 Drake alum, is general manager and executive vice president of Red Light Management, an independent music management company that represents many well-known artists, among them Luke Bryan, Lionel Richie, Michelle Williams, Phish, Ben Harper and the Dave Matthews Band. Azu, who has a marketing degree from Drake, attributes his first big break in the music industry to the time he booked the Dave Matthews Band to perform on campus during his senior year. “Drake University has had a massive impact on my life professionally and personally,” Azu said in a statement. “If not for Drake, I would undoubtedly not be where I am today. I look forward to harnessing my passion for the university while performing my duties as a board member.” Azu was selected by Billboard magazine as a “Top 40 Under 40: Music’s Young Power Player” in 2014 and 2015. He served on Drake University’s National Alumni Board until 2017 and was a recipient of Drake’s Young Alumni Achievement award in 2007. He begins his three-year term on the board of trustees in April.

Read more notebook items anytime at businessrecord.com/notebook

BY PERRY BEEMAN Works by three female Iowa artists focusing on the beauty and balance of nature are featured in a new exhibition in Gov. Kim Reynolds’ formal office. The Iowa Women’s Art Exhibition includes pieces from Alexandra Ackerman of Iowa City, Stephanie Failmezger of Peosta and Molly Wood of Des Moines and will be on display through June 30. The women’s art initiative began in 2014, organized by the Iowa Arts Council and Reynolds, who was lieutenant governor then. “The works from these artists come in three different mediums and have their own individual identities,” said Veronica O’Hern of the Iowa Arts Council. “But they all share a common theme that connects us to our natural landscape and environment.”

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Business Record | February 9, 2018

Art by three women in Statehouse display

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A CLOSER LOOK: A local leader you should know

BRENT WILLETT President and CEO, Iowa Health Care Association BY JOE GARDYASZ

Brent Willett joined the Iowa Health Care Association as its president and CEO in September, just a week before the organization’s annual convention. That timing gave Willett, who was previously executive director of the Cultivation Corridor, the opportunity to meet many of the nearly 1,000 IHCA members attending the event. Before leading the Cultivation Corridor, Willett was president and CEO of the North Iowa Corridor Economic Development Corp., and earlier in his career he worked for the Iowa Economic Development Authority, the Fairfield Economic Development Association and the Fairfield Area Chamber of Commerce. The IHCA — along with its divisions, the Iowa Center for Assisted Living and the Iowa Center for Home Care — is a nonprofit trade association representing the long-term care continuum. Willett leads a full-time staff of 12, including a lobbying team that represents the industry at the Iowa Statehouse. What kind of a learning curve has there been for you in health care? One of the reasons that I took the job was having interacted with a few members of our staff; we have extremely deep technical knowledge on our staff. So really early on, it’s been a huge learning curve, but it’s also been an exercise in leadership and empowering our staff members to demonstrate even more leadership and idea making, because I need that as someone new to the profession. … I treat this as a multiyear learning curve. … It’s an extremely complex portfolio of work we’re charged with here.

Business Record | February 9, 2018

What key issues rise to the top for you? One of our primary, long-standing and increasingly acute challenges is the lack of funding in the Medicaid system, both at the state and federal levels. At the state level, we know that revenues have not kept up with expenses in terms of the state’s budget, and really difficult decisions have to be made, but it’s our job to demonstrate the challenge that underfunding has created in long-term care. Right now we are underfunding long-term care Medicaid patients by about $30 per person, per day. That doesn’t mean they don’t get the care that they need, but it does mean that our providers have to find places to absorb those losses and shi those

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costs. And they are operating on very narrow margins, in many cases less than 1 percent. There’s nowhere to shi that cost except to raise the cost of private-pay residents, who end up having their costs inflated because we don’t have enough money in the system to support the cost of Medicaid long-term care patients. We’ve seen private-pay rates grow by $10 to $15 a day at least over the last five years, and we’re projecting that to continue. What challenges does this create for your member providers? The transition to Medicaid managed care (which happened in April 2016) has been a challenge for some of our providers, primarily as it relates to the advanced administrative burden that the system has created. … We’ve seen an increase in pending claims or claims denials that tend to go to appeal. … It is a long, drawn-out process in many cases. We at the association agree that for certain populations there can be a role for managed care in Iowa. With the majority of our population being chronic long-term care, which are folks who are unlikely to be moving within care seings and having their care changed, there’s not as much of a role for care coordination, because there’s not much to coordinate; it’s just staying the same. We’re open to new ideas about how we manage that particular population and are certainly engaged in discussions about that. Is managed care creating financial stress for many providers? We haven’t seen a tremendous amount of closures yet; there were about four nursing homes that closed last year. We are concerned about smaller independent operators. Fiy-one percent of individuals receiving long-term care in Iowa are (receiving) Medicaid. So when we’re not able to fully fund the cost of half of the population, that becomes burdensome for independent smaller providers who can’t necessarily bridge that cost, or that have a high Medicaid census. We’ve identified about 65 nursing homes in Iowa that have a Medicaid census of 65 percent or higher, so those are the folks who are certainly at risk.

what’s important?

SUBMITTED PHOTO

AGE: 35 FAMILY: Wife, Emily; daughter, Kate, 2½ HOMETOWN: Davenport EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, English, University of Iowa; MBA, Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa CONTACT: Email: [email protected] Phone: (515) 978-2204

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Have any other states tried doing this? A number of states have looked at it, but none have executed an exemption of long-term care. There are states that never included long-term care in the first place — Tennessee is an example — which is a recognition that there wasn’t a need for managed care for this population. Florida is an example of a state that continues to take a hard look at exempting long-term care from managed care. Do you foresee much growth in membership ahead? In the aggregate, no, and the reason for that is we represent the vast majority of providers already. In that context there’s not a lot of room for growth. We’re certainly paying aention to trends that are placing stress on independent rural nursing homes. I think it’s very likely there will be fewer independent, smaller rural nursing homes in five years than we have today. So from a membership standpoint we’re probably going to lose some of those. Fieen years ago, we diversified into assisted living and created the Iowa Center for Assisted Living. Three years ago, we diversified into home care and created the Iowa Center for Home Care. In three years, we’ve come to represent nearly 100 separate home care agencies. We also represent about 100 medical directors through the Iowa Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care. We’ll continue to look at the care continuum and identify which areas we believe we can add value to. Do your 12 staff members specialize by areas of care? We’re one of the most diversified long-term care organizations in the country, both in terms of our size and the breadth of the care continuum that we represent. … We have staff leads who serve as points of contact for each area, but everybody is crosstrained and works across the care continuum. Not only can each of our staff members be of service to each of our members, but it keeps us grounded and nimble in really understanding what’s happening on the ground. We want to be able to represent the care continuum across the board; that’s been a deliberate approach here for a long time, and I think it’s the right one.

Are you geing involved in any new civic organizations? That’s a big goal of mine in 2018; I have been so involved with my head down working to get up to speed in this new role — it’s been a very intense time. It’s a challenge switching industries, even in town. You leave a lot of those events and organizations behind on a day-to-day basis and you really build up a new core set of things. Coming from economic development, I have a huge appreciation for the role that civic organizations play locally and across the state.

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I TREAT THIS AS A MULTIYEAR LEARNING CURVE. IT’S AN EXTREMELY COMPLEX PORTFOLIO OF WORK WE’RE CHARGED WITH HERE.

Do you still get a chance to run? I made that a priority, despite how busy things have been. It helps me to clear my head. The fitness side of it’s great, but it’s my cognitive cleansing activity more than anything. I have a 2½-year-old at home, so when I get it done can be at all hours of the night or early in the morning. I’m really looking forward to running Dam to Dam this year. „

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Business Record | February 9, 2018

What legislative issues are important this year? Number one, we’re interested in finding ways to claw back the elimination of 90-day retroactive Medicaid eligibility (that was enacted as a cost-containment measure in last year’s state budget). That’s a big deal for our providers. That 90-day window that’s still in place in 49 other states is there for a reason, not because it’s a benefit but because it’s an administrative tool to ensure that somebody who is a private-pay resident in a facility who becomes Medicaid-eligible — which means they’ve run out of money — that the provider can have a reasonable expectation of being reimbursed for the cost associated with caring for that person during the period when they’ve run out of money but they’ve not yet been approved for Medicaid. Now it’s a maximum of 30 days, going back to the first of the month. So for providers that means they end up paying for care they’re not reimbursed for, so it’s a cost-shi to providers. … We have talked with dozens of legislators and the governor’s office and have seen tremendous support and recognition that this was an unintended consequence of this action, so we’ve seen a great deal of support for finding a fix. Another major priority for us — we are proposing that the state exempt chronic long-term care from the managed care system and move them back to a fee-for-service system and use some of the savings that that would create. Currently the managed care organizations are receiving an 8 to 12 percent administrative fee for managing those cases, and we don’t believe there’s a lot to manage in those cases. We want to use some of the savings from that to help fund some of this chronic lack of funding in Medicaid reimbursement. We think there’s a real case to be made (for doing this) with this population.

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MICHELLE HILL

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LOOKING FOR AN

EDGE

PHOTO BY DUANE TINKEY

Business Record | February 9, 2018

director, Waukee APEX

State, schools seek apex in training for STEM workers

KURT SCHADE Realtor®, Coldwell Banker Mid-America Group CELL 515-208-0757 [email protected] www.kurtschade.com

Altoona • Ankeny • Des Moines Johnston • Pella • West Des Moines

“Education happens in many ways, four-year degrees, two-year degrees, apprenticeships,” Byam said. “What are the different ways to achieve that?” Gov. Kim Reynolds has pushed apprenticeships as an important part of Future Ready Iowa, a broad effort to expand the Iowa workforce. The program goal is for 70 percent of Iowa workers to have some type of posthigh-school education by 2025, whether at a college or university or in a certificate program. That would mean adding 127,700 Iowans to the ranks of postsecondary education of some kind. The U.S. Department of Labor granted Iowa $1.8 million to start preapprenticeship pilot programs, which are extensions of an already developed system of school programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. For Kruck, the program is a chance to identify potential employees. “This gives us a head start on recruiting,” Houston said. “It’s competitive. There are a lot of contractors out there that need the workforce. A lot of the emphasis has been on college education,” to the point that there aren’t enough laborers, he added. For Byam, the trick is to offer a full range of educational opportunities, including the trades. “We want them to be successful in whatever they choose to do,” he said of students. Byam is working with Fareway on job opportunities such as meatcuing. “They said if the students had six specific skills they would hire them on the spot,” he said. He’s also talking with the city’s fire department about jobs as building inspectors, and looking at animal science and agriculture curricula.

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Two of four schools offering pre-apprenticeship programs with the help of the state are in Central Iowa, working to make sure students consider options ranging from certificates to four-year degrees. Schools in Waukee, Boone, Spencer and Muscatine are part of a pilot program. At Boone, that means the EDGE program is in its first year of operation, with four students working with Kruck Plumbing and Pritchard Brothers Plumbing & Heating to learn plumbing and mechanical techniques. “They are going through a curriculum tailored to plumbing, heating and cooling, sheet metal, and electrical work,” said Boone High School Principal Kristopher Byam. Chad Houston, president of Kruck, said the pre-apprenticeship programs help students get a head start. “The ultimate goal is to take care of part of a four-year apprenticeship before they leave school,” he said. Byam said Associated Builders and Contractors Inc. has been working with the U.S. Department of Labor on the grant program that supports the pre-apprenticeships. “We allow that curriculum in the public schools,” Byam said. “We have a safety program, forklift certification and labs. We are moving that to a lot younger students so when they leave they might be able to get into a second-year apprenticeship.” It’s part of a statewide effort to make sure students know that fouryear college or university degrees aren’t their only option. The state reports that by 2024, Iowa will have more than 1,000 job openings in computer and math work, 600-plus in engineering and architecture jobs, and just more than 500 in science jobs. That’s why the state and various schools are trying to work on the problem now.

Business Record | February 9, 2018

BY PERRY BEEMAN

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THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY RIGHT HERE IN TOWN.

Business Record | February 9, 2018

Kristopher Byam, Principal, Boone High School

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Houston is spreading the word about the Boone program, in part for the good of his own company. “Finding that quality person that fits your team is tough,” he said. “This is an opportunity right here in town.” Students interested in building trades are working with blueprints in class, then visiting construction sites to see the work take form. Byam doesn’t expect to have students in each subject area every year, but he wants to offer a broad array of choices. A similar program, Waukee APEX, will enroll its first students this spring, said Director Michelle Hill. APEX is in a building that opened in January 2017. The program hoped to add the pre-apprenticeships in fall 2017, but there were delays. Work on funding, staffing and business partners continued this semester. Waukee High School already offers a construction leadership class that works on heating and cooling, electrical, carpentry, advanced manufacturing, robotics, engineering and technology. Hill said she’s working with Ankeny-based Accumold on possible instruction in information technology. “We are finding that they are hiring our students right out of our program,” Hill said. “We’re connecting the dots.” Hill said Waukee has had an internship program for 20 years and the APEX work-experience program for four. She said the pre-apprenticeship program makes it easier for juniors and seniors to explore careers. “They will be working on value-added projects with employers,” with possible work in medical technology, engineering and veterinary medicine. “What we had missing was a lot of trades and information technology,” she said.

Juniors oen explore, picking from 14 APEX courses in areas such as insurance, architecture and biomedicine. Seniors study a certain field one semester and complete an internship the second. Among the business partners are Bell Brothers Heating & Air Conditioning Inc., Webster Electric Inc. and Hubbell Realty Co. (construction management). The overall program grew from 100 students in 2014 to 400 now. By the end of the year, 1,000 students will have been in the program. The high demand for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) workers and the higher pay those jobs command have made this a good time to encourage high schools to test students’ interest in the fields before their senior year, said Carrie Rankin, assistant director for development for the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council. Many students can spend part of their junior year checking out welding, or information technology, or carpentry to see if they are interested. Then, in their senior year, they can get an internship that could pay them, plus earn them high school and college course credits while shortening their training at the local trade union — should they go that route. “The earlier the beer to get to students,” Rankin said. “This makes the connection between students and the companies so we can ‘grow our own,’ ” she added, meaning that the state can keep its own graduates, reducing the need to lure workers to Iowa. “Pre-apprenticeships offer hands-on experience as early as ninth grade,” Rankin said. “That is so critical. Not all students are equipped to go down the pathway of a four-year degree. There are great, high-paying jobs in Iowa” in the trades and other fields that don’t necessarily require traditional bachelor’s or master’s degrees, she added. “Students might not necessarily understand that there are opportunities for them in their communities, while they are still in high school,” Rankin added. And if the students decide to shi gears later, what’s the harm? “What organization doesn’t have a need for science, engineering, math or critical thinking,” things that the pre-apprenticeships stress, Rankin said. Students also work on big data applications and the application of technology. “It’s a huge eye-opener that students might not contemplate as part of a welding program,” Rankin said. Doing some of the work in high school saves money on training programs later, she added. “And the businesses hope they are training future employees and keeping them in Iowa.” Rankin said the state hopes to offer pre-apprenticeships beyond the four initial schools, which are developing a playbook for other schools to use to launch similar programs. Iowa State University is evaluating the programs to see if they are effective. Georgia Van Gundy, executive director of the Iowa Business Council, said the pre-apprenticeships build on a system that gives students a chance to make money while geing a head start on their post-highschool education. “Apprenticeship programs allow students to earn while they learn and outline a very clear career path for them. And you move up the pay scale as you go,” even in school, Van Gundy said.

Kristopher Byam, Principal, Boone High School

For many, apprenticeships allow someone to change career paths, or to improve one they’ve chosen, and workers are more likely to stay on the job aer that training, she added. Vermeer is working with Career Academy of Pella to train welders, giving the company a chance to size up candidates, Van Gundy said. Utilities have worked with students on technician, plant worker and line crew work. Ruan is looking at opportunities. “It shows that companies are looking at different ways to aract a workforce,” Van Gundy said. Mike Ralston, president of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry, said the pre-apprenticeship programs are important additions to the work-related offerings. “ABI members want to use this,” Ralston said. “They are having all kinds of difficulties” hiring help. Some have had to offer split shis, flex time and other “creative” approaches to lure employees, he added. Some are offering higher pay. “For too long businesspeople were too critical of education: ‘You aren’t geing us enough people.’ Now they really have to be a partner.” And with ABI’s programs, Future Ready Iowa, the apprenticeships, internships, and certificate programs — along with support for colleges and universities — they are. „

nominations 2018 Forty Under 40 Alumnus of the Year This award is given to past Forty Under 40 recipients in recognition of their ongoing contributions to the community.

Know someone worthy of further recognition? Contact Jason Swanson at [email protected] or visit tinyurl.com/2018alum. Submission deadline is February 9, 2018.

PAST ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR RECIPIENTS

ROBERT ANDEWEG 2017

DON COFFIN 2016

MICHAEL SADLER CAROLE TILLOTSON 2013 2014

KYLE KRAUSE 2011

DREW MCLELLAN 2010

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CREupdate real estate

& development news

PHOTOS BY DUANE TINKEY

Kent Darr, senior staff writer [email protected]

Craig Fritzjunker in the offices of JTH Lighting Alliance, located in a warehouse he is renovating at 319 S.W. Fih St. in Des Moines.

A quiet conversion Industrial designer, two sons, converting warehouse to offices, with entertainment on the bill

Business Record | February 9, 2018

BY KENT DARR

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A three-story warehouse is being renovated with lile fanfare and no tax incentives along Southwest Fih Street in Des Moines and, at least for now, that’s just the way owner and rehabber Craig Fritzjunker likes it. Fritzjunker is creating a unique blend of office space, maybe with some room for restaurants and other retail in a building that for years was known as a space for bands to practice. “I would like to keep them just because it would be fun,” said Fritzjunker, an industrial designer who has had an ownership interest in the 97-year-old building since 2011 and became the sole owner in 2014 aer buying out partner Andre DeLong, who at one time operated a furniture-building operation on the first floor. As an industrial designer, Fritzjunker, whose own business is called the Junker Group, has designed a range of projects in Greater Des Moines, including the famed Meredith Corp. test kitchens.

His other works include exhibits, museum displays and retail shops. He is carrying on a family tradition, of sorts. Fritzjunker’s first experience with renovations was helping his parents rehab apartment buildings in Keokuk. His labor of love is the warehouse. His sons help out on the project, but other than specialized help or mechanical replacements and repairs, this is Fritzjunker’s project. To further the family connection, Fritzjunker’s wife would like him to design a condominium for the third floor. Adding a residential unit would add too many complications to the project, he said. The operation is being financed with a bank loan — secured aer he was able to get tenants into finished spaces — and sweat equity. If he had sought incentives from the city, he might not have been able to make all target dates typically called for in development agreements. He considered seeking a private investor, but decided he wanted to be his own boss.

“Basically, the only way this happens is thousands of hours of sweat equity,” he said. Fritzjunker and sons have replaced minuscule, light-limiting warehouse windows throughout the building with much larger windows that measure 5 by 8 feet. Loading docks are becoming entrances. A freight elevator will shule tenants to upper floors. In many offices, hickory flooring covers concrete; drywall goes up in spaces where it is called for; debates ensue over rooms that would benefit from exposed brick. Fritzjunker can offer potential customers a preview of future configurations via 3-D design programs. Each floor, including the basement, is 8,000 square feet, ideal for smaller operations that appeal as much to Fritzjunker’s whimsy as to the needs of his business plan. A second-floor restroom is ornamented with a velvet Elvis.

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“I don’t want it to be too serious,” Fritzjunker said. So far as hiing hard deadlines, it can’t be too serious. He tries to keep the racket, dust and general chaos of demolition to a minimum so he doesn’t disrupt other tenants. One of those tenants is JTH Lighting Alliance, which has an office, showroom and demonstration space on the second floor. All of the furniture for the office was built in a first-floor shop where the entire space with its exposed beams and heating and ventilation systems recalls the building’s warehouse days. As further proof that the rehab is a work in progress, the JTH crew waited two years for windows to be replaced. Fritzjunker is finishing space for a law firm. Other tenants include Garman Partners, a placement company in the construction industry. Griffin Lander’s recording studio, the Establishment, has been in the building about seven years. Exterior work has included moving power lines underground and construction of planters. “I want it to fit the neighborhood,” which also includes Harbach Los, directly across the street to the west, and AP Los, a few industrial doors to the south. „

The third floor of the warehouse building, called Create 319, is ready for rehab. Fritzjunker can provide a 3-D preview for potential tenants.

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We are working on a partnership with one of the attendees. We developed two relationships that will be of benefit to our company in the future.” – past Partnering for Growth Biotech Innovation Showcase & Forum participant

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TECH & INNOVATION

THE LINEUP Josh Gates, archaeologist, adventurer, author and host of “Expedition Unknown” on the Travel Channel.

Jonathan Frakes, actor, author and director; played Cmdr. William T. Riker in the television series “Star Trek: The Next Generation.”

Jill Heinerth, diver, adventurer and explorer of the inside of Antarctic icebergs.

Kenny Aronoff, named by Rolling Stone

JILL HEINERTH

magazine as one of the “100 Greatest Drummers of All Time.” He’s kept the beat for John Fogerty, John Mellencamp, the Rolling Stones, Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga, Bob Dylan and Paul McCartney.

Rob Manning, chief engineer for NASA’s

Inspirations KENNY ARONOFF

ciWeek speakers share lessons from deep ocean, concert stages, boundary breaking

Jet Propulsion Lab Engineering and Science Directorate. He has worked on robotic spacecra for 35 years.

James Barrat, author and filmmaker. His book “Our Final Invention: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Human Era” examines the dangers of artificial intelligence. Gabor George Burt, expert on innovation and author of “Slingshot: Re-Imagine Your Business, Re-Imagine Your Life.” David Gallo, ocean explorer preparing for his fourth trip to the Titanic and author of TED presentation “Underwater Astonishments,” which has 14 million views (http://bit.ly/1MfCX8Z).

Nathalia Holt, science writer and New York

DAVID GALLO

Times best-selling author of “Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us from Missiles to the Moon to Mars.”

Jill Pruetz, Iowa State University professor and primatologist supported by the National Geographic Society and the National Science Foundation. Her work with chimpanzees and monkeys has taken her to Peru, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Kenya and Senegal.

Rod Pyle, author, journalist, historian, futurist and filmmaker. He has written 11 books on space history, exploration and development.

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original paint cars and trucks. He is the brother of Mike Wolfe of the show “American Pickers.”

CIWEEK 9

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Business Record | February 9, 2018

Rob Wolfe, lifelong “picker” of antiques and

March 5-8

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GABOR GEORGE BURT

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KENNY ARONOFF about inspiration and innovation. This year, the sessions will be about a man who has aention deficit disorder but still managed to score a couple of high-tech A’s in community college classes that sent him soaring to a career as an explorer now planning his fourth exploration of the Titanic wreck. It will be about a world-class drummer who knows that teamwork is important when you work for artists as diverse as the Rolling Stones and Celine Dion, and that innovation drives what happens in modern high-tech recording studios. The sessions will examine the life lessons of geing stuck in unexpected currents under an iceberg. And they’ll explain how reimagining boundaries can do everything from creating high-power partnerships among the likes of American Express and Wal-Mart to improving test scores at a small-town school. We interviewed four of this year’s speakers in advance of the ciWeek presentations, hoping to get your curiosity primed. Here’s some of what we learned.

Kenny Aronoff, A-list drummer, said his presentation will intersperse his percussion performance with words of wisdom and photos and video of famous bands. “It is designed to talk about teamwork through the lens of the greatest rock bands ever,” he said. He’s played with artists of varying genres, from John Fogerty of “Creedence Clearwater Revival” fame, and ex-Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr to Alice Cooper, Smashing Pumpkins, Santana, Buddy Guy and Ray Charles. He’s worked on albums that have sold a combined 300 million copies, some 1,300 works that among them scored 16 Grammy nominations. What does this have to do with business? “Music changes by the second,” and so does business, Aronoff said. “Businesses can go out of focus and relevance,” hence the troubles at Kodak and GoPro, he said. The important thing is to analyze the team and how it works, to make sure the business ventures work, he said. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 >>

Business Record | February 9, 2018

Des Moines Area Community College’s ciWeek9, running March 5-8, is all

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BY PERRY BEEMAN

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 >>

Aronoff offers seven keys to success, which he says are obvious but important. 1. Practice self-discipline. 2. Work hard, fueled by passion and education. 3. Know RPS: “Repetition is preparation for success.” He finds that important in his diet and his drumming, for example. “Do things you don’t want to do,” he added. 4. Build communication skills. “Drop your ego and serve the song, serve the boss. My ability to communicate and get along is huge. I am in the service business. I serve. Some people are not adaptable.” 5. Create a plan that you execute to become successful. 6. A healthy life is a wealthy life. “Without that, everything else is useless.” 7. Stay relevant and focused.

Business Record | February 9, 2018

A lot of success comes down to hard work, Aronoff said. “People want a magic pill to drop out of the sky. It’s not going to happen.” For example, Aronoff still practices. He put in hours before drumming for a Led Zeppelin tribute show aer friends had said, “You know these songs.” Even a root canal leading up to the gig couldn’t stop him. “I practiced for four hours, and did every song, then two more hours aer the first show and then a third time. When I did the show, I kicked ass.” He also has worked to change the field of drumming, creating his own line of sticks. “Innovation is a huge part of my entire life and career. I’m always looking for a way to be beer. I will never be as great as I want to be, but I am willing to spend the rest of my life trying to be as good as I can be.” Technology allows drummers to fix mistakes digitally, and it also allows people to take Arnonoff’s beats and string them together into a newly created digital beat. He’s experimented with digital drums and percussion. “I have my own studio. I am doing old school and new school.” He used a digital pad to add the hand claps on the John Fogerty hit “Centerfield.” He decided to switch from Remo drum heads to Evans models aer testing the new heads for a year. “Engineers said they sound beer.”

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GABOR GEORGE BURT Gabor George Burt is an author who spends a good bit of time thinking about and addressing innovation, creativity and the development of strategies. In today’s world, he helps businesses react to stresses and volatility, while also working to rid themselves of boundaries that are in the way. “We live in a VUCA environment,” Burt said. “It’s the type of environment that is all about volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. These are four evils lurking all around us. “As a business, how do you stay in control, rather than reacting to the environment? The answer has to do with our ability to use wonderful resources we have available — our imagination and creativity.” Burt, author of “Slingshot: Re-Imagine Your Business, Re-Imagine Your Life,” talks a lot now about reimagining boundaries. “I empower (people) to make use of creativity to reimagine selfimposed boundaries to achieve levels of market relevance, growth and success.” He wants this to occur in an organized fashion, but is it realistic to expect to unleash creativity with the step-by-step order of a laborer laying bricks? “That is what holds people back,” Burt said. “They see it as an abstract thing.” “This is not about brainstorming. This is about understanding what you want to do and knowing how to engage your creativity.” Burt uses the slingshot imagery because as kids, many of us grabbed a slingshot and thought about anything but boundaries. “We were a hunter, or a spy, a huntress.” So success really is about addressing “the tension against self-imposed boundaries,” he said. Once those boundaries are gone, the business can expand in unexpected ways,” added Burt, a self-described “provocateur.” “There is great knowledge in every person. When you combine that with natural creativity and ability,” great things can happen, he added. Burt tells the story of a small town in the United States. Along a road, there was a school on one side, and a nursing home across from it. The school had low test scores. The senior citizens in the home felt abandoned.

One day someone had an idea. What if the senior citizens tutored the students at the school in reading? “It led to a remarkable transformation. Reading scores went up. And across the street, the mood and feeling and reality improved dramatically.” “I like to create success champions,” Burt said. When American Express wanted to expand its play into personal finance platforms, Burt helped the company link up with Wal-Mart, and the two formed Bluebird. In another case, Burt helped form MissionU in San Francisco, an online and in-classroom program that charges no tuition but takes 15 percent of a graduate’s income a year aer the person is earning at least $50,000 until the tab is paid off. If a student never reaches $50,000, there is no payment for the education. It’s a way to address both the student debt issue and the fact that universities should be investing in students, not the other way around, Burt said. And there is the supermarket experience. Burt said most people see shopping for food as a necessary evil. But what if it became a kind of game, perhaps an obstacle course or some kind of time trial that awarded prizes or coupons, Burt wondered. Maybe we could simply try to break our own time for buying groceries. Maybe there could be fitness stations in the store that allowed us to combine shopping with fitness, saving time. “Our realization that we need to rethink things is geing beer,” Burt said. “(But) we have a creativity crisis. There is a disconnect on how to do it.” Which is where Burt comes in.

JILL HEINERTH Jill Heinerth’s business card reads “explorer.” That is an understatement. She has scubadived 7,500 times, as deep as 450 feet, breathing odd mixes of helium, oxygen and nitrogen through a rebreather, which recirculates the gases to save air and prevents bubbles from blocking the view of the odd sea creatures she encounters. One of her life lessons: Know when to quit. “We have the rule of survivors. You have to know when to abort (the dive) even if you are an inch from gold. I have skipped projects because I wasn’t prepared. I have lost many friends” who died on dives. Her most challenging situation underwater?

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DAVID GALLO One image. That’s all it took to send David Gallo down a career path that will soon include his fourth trip to the Titanic wreck site. The photo in National Geographic in 1976 showed famed ocean explorer and eventual Gallo colleague Robert Ballard at an underwater mountain range. “That one picture sent me on my path” because of sheer amazement, Gallo said. It wasn’t a straight line to success. Fighting through problems with aention deficit disorder, Gallo scored an A in pre-calculus and computer science at a community college aer his secondary teachers had told him to “do something with your hands” for a living. That success sent him on to a full set of undergraduate and graduate degrees and a long career that ended with his retirement at 62. He came out of retirement to plan several more missions.

and live broadcasts from the site. They’ll be looking for some key artifacts, including Omar Khayyam’s “Rubaiyyat,” published in 1860 and encrusted with more than 1,000 jewels, and a statue of Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt. Gallo said Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which has backed his missions, should have claimed the Titanic so it could protect it. Instead, the French started picking up artifacts and got the rights to salvage, through RMS Titanic Inc. At this point, what has been taken has been from the debris field, and not from the ship itself, Gallo said. Courts have limited what can be done with the artifacts. Part of the latest expedition will be to decide if some parts of the ship should be covered to protect them from deterioration, Gallo said. The Titanic is only one of the many wrecks that draw aention, Gallo said. In fact, every year, 14 large ships sink. “In the past, we would commit the souls to eternity. Now people want to know what happened. Insurers, families, shipbuilders want to know.”

FIND THAT CURIOSITY AND THROW THAT SWITCH ... David Gallo

What drives Gallo? It isn’t bounty. “There are professional explorers out there,” Gallo said. “People who make a living off exploration. I don’t particularly like that. I would do what I do whether I get paid or not. Luckily, I do (get paid). We are just driven by our own curiosity. That’s a powerful thing. It keeps you up day and night.” Gallo now wants to look for the ship Endurance under the ice in Antarctica. He hopes to look at the trail of the Atlantis civilization in the Mediterranean Sea. It’s all about taking the shot. “Find that curiosity and throw that switch,” Gallo said. “I hope people get a chance to do that. You have to give something up. There are no free lunches. (But) the payoff could make you very happy.” „

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“Don’t let anyone tell you no,” Gallo advises. “Follow your dreams. It’s great if you can find your passion.” (Gallo notes that Iowa has delivered some of the most famous oceanographers in history, including the late Roger Larson of Stratford, who studied at Iowa State University; University of Delaware geologist John Madsen, also an ISU graduate; and the late Bruce Heezen of Vinton, who graduated from the University of Iowa.) Gallo makes a living exploring the ocean, which covers 70 percent of the globe. Humans have really only explored 5 percent of it, he notes. When Gallo addresses audiences, whether at TED talks or at ciWeek in West Des Moines, he tries to lay out the value of pushing the envelope and searching for answers. “I try to expose them to our planet, what we know, what we don’t know, what we need to know.” Some of what he’s discovered is featured in a TED video, “Underwater Astonishments,” that had more than 14 million views by the end of January. It includes footage of bizarre creatures that emit their own light, off and on. Gallo said science is all about discovery, another lesson that transfers to business. “We found the biggest mountain range on Earth underwater. We found underwater lakes. We found all kinds of bizarre animals. No life on the bottom of the ocean? We found more species than there are in the rainforest. “We are always being surprised. Every time we put a new type of equipment in, we find something new.” In May, Gallo will return to the Titanic, in part to improve earlier imaging. “We will map every lump and bump.” One of the main missions will be to catalog what is on and in the Titanic, and to determine how long the ship can stand up to the deterioration that is happening from natural forces. The crew will carry virtual reality cameras so that someday we’ll all be able to tour through the Titanic from the comfort of dry land. That will be the latest step in innovation. Gallo notes that scientists along the way have determined within a few minutes when the ship hit boom in 12,500 feet of water, advanced from fuzzy images to detailed video, then to live cable feeds

Business Record | February 9, 2018

“I was in Antarctica in an iceberg (130 feet below the surface) and I got pinned down by a raging current that came from nowhere. My glove was leaving and my hand was numb.” A one-hour dive in 28-degree water turned into three hours. “I really thought we might not make it.” She escaped the danger, using holes le by fish in the ice to basically rock climb out of the mess. Heinerth spends about half her time diving and half giving presentations. She’s a writer and photographer and artist who originally was trained in visual communications and design. She wanted to be an astronaut, but her native Canada didn’t have opportunities. She got into diving the usual way — for fun. But she now explores “inner space” and goes places that are more unknown than some of the NASA destinations in space. An astronaut once told Heinerth her technical dives are more terrifying than a NASA mission, because the astronauts have Mission Control backing them up. She oen dives alone, but for a Hollywood taping in Mexico she had 18 on the team. Her career is built on collaboration, critical thinking, teamwork, social skills, safety and engineering, elements of many businesses.

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AI: THE 4TH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION Hey, Siri ... will my job be replaced by artificial intelligence? Well, according to a study from global consultancy McKinsey, as many as 70 million Americans — one-third of our workforce — could be forced out of work by automation during the next 13 years. Yes, that’s a particularly bleak prediction, and a bit more extreme than most, but a quick search will reveal a plethora of studies predicting varying degrees of job loss and disruption. And if you think your industry won’t be affected, think again. Nearly every role in every sector could be affected. It might seem that only office support and predictable physical workers will be displaced, but AI has demonstrated the ability to handle knowledge-based, white-collar work. In fact, one Japanese insurance company reportedly replaced 34 of its insurance claim workers with “IBM Watson Explorer.” As AI and automation have become more infused in our day-to-day lives, and news story aer news story predicts a dystopian future, there’s no question that artificial intelligence and automation will be one of the most disruptive forces to affect our workplaces and region.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 7 AM registration, networking and continental breakfast 7:30 – 9 AM panel discussion

Some call it the fourth industrial revolution. And while the first three were filled with tremendous disruption, they also led to dramatic societal improvements. As we prepare for the fourth industrial revolution, how can Des Moines and our business community position themselves to meet the challenge of that disruption by preparing to implement AI to augment our community, businesses and workforces?

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Conference Registration Opens Feb. 22 Iowa’s premier business conference may be four months away, but registration opens later this month — and there are plenty of reasons to register early: 1.

BPC Chairman Connie Wimer BPC President Janette Larkin Publisher Chris Conetzkey BPC Vice President Jason Swanson Business Manager Eileen Jackson Accounting Specialist Becky Hotchkiss Office Manager Laura Stegemann Inside Sales Representative Alison Damon Senior Graphic Designer Brianna Schechinger Graphic Designer II Lauren Hayes Graphic Designer Sami Schrader Photographer Duane Tinkey Copy Editor Kurt Helland Director of Advertising Sara Brown Director of Strategic Partnerships Katherine Harrington Senior Account Executives Lori Bratrud, Maria Davis Account Executive Laura Stapes Business Record® (USPS 154-740, ISSN 1068-6681) is published by Business Publications Corporation Inc., The Depot at Fourth, 100-4th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309, (515) 288-3336. Contents © 2018 Business Record. Published weekly. Annual subscriptions $69.95. Single copy price is $1.75. Copies of past issues, as available, may be purchased for $4.50 each. Periodicals Postage Paid at Des Moines, Iowa. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Business Publications, The Depot at Fourth, 100-4th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309.

ABI members than ever before. In addition, the governor and lieutenant governor, other state officials, and more legislators of both parties and both chambers aended than ever before. On behalf of the board of directors, thank you for your participation. Another key metric involves ABI holding a terrific annual conference. I assure you the 2018 conference will be the best one ever — and it is only four months away! Make plans now to join your ABI colleagues in Greater Iowa City on June 5-7 for the ABI Taking Care of Business Conference. Fantastic venues, terrific nationally known speakers and the very best business networking anywhere will all be a part of ABI’s 115th annual meeting. You do not want to miss it! Thank you once more for your support.

Receive the early bird discount. Those who sign up during the first few weeks of registration receive a deep discount on the price. Saving money on rich programming and valuable networking? That’s a no-brainer.

2. Ensure your spot at our alternate activities. Each year, ABI offers unique opportunities to participate in behind-the-scenes tours of local companies, golf at world-class courses and find a variety of other fun activities. However, spots fill up quickly. Sign up early to ensure you’re able to aend the activities of your choice. 3. Select your top workshops. The 2018 Taking Care of Business Conference will have 19 workshops offering expert advice on everything from cybersecurity to workplace well-being. These workshops are filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

Once you’ve registered, or even before, make sure to book your hotel room. Space is filling up fast. Two of the conference hotels, the Coralville Marrio and Homewood Suites, are sold out. But don’t worry; there are plenty of great rooms at the other conference hotel, Radisson Coralville. Visit ABITakingCareOfBusiness.com to learn more.

Business Record IOWA | February 2018

Iowa Association of Business and Industry. “The Voice of Iowa Business since 1903” is the largest business network in the state (serving as Iowa’s state chamber) with a long legacy of advocating for a competitive business climate in Iowa. ABI offers its nearly 1,500 member companies and their employees opportunities to network, learn best practices in lean processes, workforce, workers’ compensation, controlling health care costs, employee drug testing, environmental issues and leadership. ABI works “to foster a favorable business, economic, governmental and social climate within the State of Iowa so that our citizens have the opportunity to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.”

This edition of Business Record Iowa has a cover story focused on one of our state’s important assets. That asset is Iowa’s Creative Corridor, the region encompassing Cedar Rapids, Iowa City and nearby counties. The Creative Corridor is an economic engine for Iowa, and it is a part of the state that features a large number of ABI member companies. I hope you enjoy learning more about this exciting region in this month’s newsmagazine. On other fronts, I would note that February marks the eighth month of ABI’s fiscal year. Thanks to your support and leadership, our association is enjoying one of its strongest years ever. Public policy achievements, Foundation programs, and ABI member meetings and events are all surpassing metrics of past years. Last month’s ABI Legislative Reception was the biggest and best yet, with more

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ABI Legislative Briefing and Reception January 10 | Iowa Taproom | Des Moines More than 550 people—including ABI members, Gov. Reynolds and Lt. Gov. Gregg, and state legislators and officials—gathered to network and discuss policies affecting Iowa employers. The annual reception is one of the best-attended events of the legislative session and ABI’s second-largest annual event.

ELEVATE IOWA

Business Record IOWA | February 2018

Reinforcing a Strong Pipeline for Iowa’s Future

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Alex Monaghan Elevate Advanced Manufacturing Program Coordinator [email protected] measuredintentions.com

Coming out of the “Great Recession” in 2012, the Iowa Association of Business and Industry (ABI) and the 15 community colleges of Iowa collaborated in an unprecedented way. The partnership is currently reaping benefits for all Iowans, given the unemployment rate is just 2.9 percent, and has created a solid foundation for new efforts to ensure Iowa’s workforce is ready for the future. Together, these organizations created Elevate Advanced Manufacturing to promote career pathways in advanced manufacturing throughout the state. ABI continues to lead this effort with the help of the community colleges. All 15 community colleges contribute $10,000 annually ($150,000 total from the Iowa Skilled

Worker and Job Creation Fund), which is matched by ABI business members to sustain continued outreach to students through curriculum distribution, regional specific programming and other creative approaches to teaching students about careers in Iowa. As a result of these efforts, enrollments and training in key manufacturing career pathways have increased an average of 14 percent and helped fill strategic positions with Iowa’s manufacturers. Recently, the ABI board reconfirmed its successful partnership with the Iowa community colleges when it voted in favor of the Work-based Opportunity Regional Referral Consortium (WORRC) at its Jan. 10 board meeting. Building on the system that

For more information or to get involved in Elevate Advanced Manufacturing, email Alex Monaghan at [email protected] or Michele Farrell at [email protected]

the partnership has created with Elevate Advanced Manufacturing, together the organizations will work to introduce work-based learning opportunities to students and future employees to careers in high-demand areas, reduce student debt, accelerate learning and reinforce the pipeline of talent for Iowa’s employers. This initiative strives to work in collaboration with Gov. Kim Reynolds’ “Future Ready Iowa” recommendations and support workbased learning opportunities. A council of ABI members and college representatives will be created to ensure collaboration and coordination, as well as the development of additional initiatives to support Iowa’s future.

EVENT REWIND

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PLAN FOR TOMORROW. ENJOY THE SUCCESSES OF TODAY.

GET TO KNOW

At Grinnell Mutual, we’re always looking forward to tomorrow. So even if the plans you have for your business aren’t the same as what the future holds, you’ll be ready. Because we’re ready.

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Trust in that. Trust in Tomorrow.® Contact a Grinnell Mutual agent today. grinnellmutual.com

Associated Computer Systems, Ltd. Informatics, Inc. NSK Corp. & NSK-AKS Precision Ball The Bill Menner Group Learn more about how ABI membership could benefit your company by visiting www.iowaabi.org/membership/why-abi.

“Trust in Tomorrow.” and “Grinnell Mutual” are registered trademarks of Grinnell Mutual Reinsurance Company. © Grinnell Mutual Reinsurance Company, 2017.

Business Record IOWA | February 2018

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Business Record IOWA | February 2018

Eastern Iowa unites to create Creative Corridor

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Aer a devastating flood in 2008 forced communities to look inward to rebuild, business leaders in Cedar Rapids, Iowa City and surrounding areas banded together to help create a unified brand for the region. Here is their story. The Creative Corridor means something a lile different to the people who live and work there. Some describe the seven-county region in eastern Iowa, including Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, as a bed of manufacturing and technological jobs, others say what defines the region is a focus on creativity and entrepreneurship. But that’s why the Creative Corridor has earned the name — it’s a combination of both and a lile bit more. “It’s not really easy [to say what the Creative Corridor means],” said Cindy Dietz, director of business communications for Cedar Rapidsbased Rockwell Collins. “I think of it as an expression of the people, the business, the whole aura of the whole Cedar Rapids/Iowa City area.” The Creative Corridor is made up of Linn, Johnson, Benton, Jones, Iowa, Cedar and Washington counties and has a combined population of more than 450,000 people. It draws workforce from surrounding areas as well, including the Quad Cities and western Illinois, which amounts to a labor footprint of more than 640,000 people. Within the Corridor comes some diversity of thought as well. Cedar Rapids and Iowa City bring something slightly different to the table when it comes to local economies and values. Cedar Rapids is a hub of manufacturing and brings big brands like General Mills, Rockwell Collins and Alliant Energy. Iowa City has a strong entrepreneurial and creative culture revolving around the University of

Iowa. But put the two together, in addition to the surrounding areas, and that creates a large, diverse workforce, as well as an already tested infrastructure. “All of a sudden, that gets the aention of a lot more companies as they ask why they want to locate in eastern Iowa,” said David Bywater, the fih-generation owner of Tru Art Color Graphics, which has an office in Iowa City. “They can perceive a diverse labor force with good amenities in the community, and so forth. It’s a big selling point to any business.” Before the Creative Corridor was the official brand of the region, the area still had those amenities — the manufacturing, educated workforce and creative culture. In fact, there was an informal name, the Technology Corridor. But it was hard for businesses and communities to market the area when recruiting people and businesses. There just wasn’t a shared identity to display. It took a flood and a group of local business leaders to change that and help the entire region become recognizable and thrive.

THE CREATION OF THE CORRIDOR The creation of a regional brand was in discussion long before it became official in 2012. The Cedar Rapids and Iowa City communities knew there was a huge advantage to having a regional identity. But aer the devastating 2008 flood sent businesses in the region, particularly in Cedar Rapids, reeling, both communities took an internal approach to rebuilding. The discussions halted.

Central to Iowa

The name was made official in 2012 but had been informally kicked around since 2010. Lohman called the creation of the brand the first phase. The second phase was geing local businesses engaged from a grass-roots level, and the third phase was Kirkwood Community College taking stewardship the brand. Now, Lohman said, the area has reached the fourth phase. It started with the creation of the Joint Venture, an organization created jointly by the Iowa City Area Development Group and the Cedar Rapids Metro Economic Alliance, in 2016.

A BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD Jennifer Daly is out to change perceptions. Just brought into the fold in the Creative Corridor in July, Daly, the new director of the Cedar Rapids Iowa City Corridor, previously the Joint Venture, is continuing to build the brand for the region. Daly, who graduated from the University of Iowa and aended high school in the area, has a strong background in building regional economic growth and marketing from the ground up. As the CEO of the Greater Peoria Economic Development Council before coming to the Corridor, Daly led a newly restructured, five-county regional development council. In that role, Daly told her colleagues and friends about growing up in the Corridor, but they didn’t exactly understand the area. They thought of it with the typical Iowan stereotype — the small towns, farming and not a whole lot to do. In this new role, Daly wants to change that. One of the first things Daly did when arriving in late July was meet with community and business leaders. Her organization was tasked with three areas of development: continuing to shape and build a regional brand, business araction and workforce develop-

Essential to The World Groundbreaking new technology and science developed in Iowa’s Cultivation Corridor is improving the ways in which the world grows, eats, and produces energy and materials. Our region’s longstanding commitment to ag innovation is central to our economy—and an essential ingredient for a more sustainable global future.

cultivationcorridor.org Business Record IOWA | February 2018

“Everyone was just trying to keep the lights on and trying to just survive at that time,” said John Lohman, the owner and president of the Corridor Business Journal. “A lot of communities just kind of retrenched aer 2008, and they weren’t focused on the region.” Lohman, Chuck Peters, then the president of the parent company of the Cedar Rapids Gazee, and Dee Baird, the former CEO of the Cedar Rapids Metro Economic Alliance, sat down and discussed. They shared a similar vision — that the region could be recognizable across the country and the globe. They set up a meeting with local business leaders in spring 2009 and enlisted the help of a regional branding expert, Michael Langley, who gave the team and the rest of the community ideas to go forward. While the cleanup from the flood was still happening in 2009, local businesses like Alliant Energy, Kirkwood Community College, the University of Iowa and more helped fund an effort, called the Corridor Business Alliance, to re-envision the region’s brand. The goal wasn’t to steer the region to a place it wanted to be, but to merely define what it represented. The alliance also didn’t want to take the individuality of the communities away, just find a way to help them by branding the entire area as a desired destination. Lohman was selected to lead the charge. He and his team hired an outside firm called North Star Destination Strategies out of Nashville, Tenn., to help in the branding effort. The firm did quantitative and qualitative research with more than 1,500 people in eastern Iowa. It found what the local business leaders knew: The mix of local manufacturing, entrepreneurship, an able and innovative workforce, and creativity were the defining traits of this region. “You added all those things together and Iowa’s Creative Corridor made a lot of sense,” Lohman said. “So that’s ultimately what we decided to hang our hat on.”

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Through its internship program, Alliant has converted more than ment. She wanted to get input from leaders to see how she could lead 100 full-time employees. And the company sees a lot more growth in this new organization. the future. Then it was time to get to work on a plan. “I think because of our current success in our economic developShe created a group of creative people in the area — graphic dement efforts, those are going to continue in a very robust way,” said signers, storytellers, communicators — to get input about the CreJeanine Penticoff, Alliant Energy’s vice president. “That’s something ative Corridor brand and a new marketing plan. What she found out that we’ll continue to offer as being a big part of this Creative Cormade her alter the path of the region, including a new name for the ridor — not only you think of the office in Cedar Rapids, but we have area in the near future. offices across our service area within that seven-county region, so we “There was one clear thing [that was a problem], and that was the have a broad base of employees we have here.” brand,” Daly said. “There was some concern that it wasn’t connecting Van Meter Inc., an electrical and automation supply company with people.” based in Cedar Rapids, has built a reputation around the area for its Daly and her team have also put together plans to build the area’s workforce development programs. The employee-owned company workforce and aract businesses. has more than 400 workers. The organization earned a spot on TrainThe workforce strategy was split into two parts: talent pipeline ing Magazine’s “Training Top 125” list in 2016 for its exceptional develand immediate workforce. Daly already has things in swing with K-12 opment programs. education to help the talent pipeline, and the University of Iowa and Every year, the company’s leaders come together for a two-day Kirkwood Community College have continued to produce quality, conference and identify a core curriculum and expectations for curwell-trained graduates. rent and future leaders. It helps The immediate workset the groundwork for leaders force area is still a work in to become the best they can be. progress. Daly said the team “We really believe that if you is figuring out how many can put your emphasis on dejobs local companies will add veloping your leaders, you can in the near future, then her help create a great workforce,” team will tailor a plan to help said Jenn Bleil, Van Meter Inc.’s service those needs. learning and development manAs for the business atager. “We spend a lot of time and traction end, Daly has idenenergy on developing existing tified six industry clusters and future leaders… There’s an that the Corridor suits well. old saying that as the leader She’s been talking to local goes, the team goes. We know CEOs within those clusters that’s true.” and will attend trade shows Van Meter Inc. also has a roall over the nation to recruit bust internship program. Along businesses in those areas to with the interns learning and come to the Corridor. doing similar jobs as the full“We’ve got an aggressive time employees, the program has sales and marketing plan for seen a strong retention rate. In this year and also the business the last three years, Bleil said the intelligence councils to help Jenn Bleil, learning and development company has hired five interns. inform us, which is very, very It’s become part of our succession important,” Daly said. manager, Van Meter Inc. planning,” Bleil said. “It’s really Local businesses, as aljust building that pipeline.” ways, have continued to step That doesn’t even include up and be leaders in the region the programs headed by other and invest in its future. big companies in the area, like General Mills, Quaker Oats and Rockwell Collins, which has 30,000 employees worldwide and many more big brands. There are other exciting developments bejust under 9,000 in Iowa, was started in Cedar Rapids in 1933. The yond the private sector as well, like the NewBo City Market and company has donated about $5 million per year for the last five the MERGE Incubator, an area for researchers to start businesses years to local nonprofits and organizations working toward the in the private space. betterment of the region and the development of the workforce. Daly is out to capture all of these exciting developments and turn “We want to build Iowa’s workforce, and those are oen the chilthem into a marketable plan, and she hopes the vision that commudren of our employees in most cases, so we want to continue to help nity leaders had more than a decade ago can come to fruition sooner Iowa grow,” Dietz said. “So it’s a lile bit self-serving in the way that rather than later. we want to make Iowa the best so we can recruit, retain and aract “I really don’t believe there’s any place better than Iowa City/ recruits and employees, but also feel it’s very important to be a good Cedar Rapids. It is just an incredible place, and I think a lot of citizen and help support our communities and our state.” times, certainly it’s a place that a lot of people don’t know about,” Alliant Energy, a Cedar Rapids-based energy company with a serDaly said. “I want to share it more widely. There’s so many exciting vice area that stretches across the Corridor and beyond, has a host of things happening here.” programs geared toward development in the region as well. Just last year, the company created a potential mega site called the Big Cedar Industrial Site. It’s a massive, 1,391-acre site in Cedar Rapids that aims to bring companies into the area. It’s located next to a railway and major roadways.

Business Record IOWA | February 2018

WE REALLY BELIEVE THAT IF YOU CAN PUT YOUR EMPHASIS ON DEVELOPING YOUR LEADERS, YOU CAN HELP CREATE A GREAT WORKFORCE.

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Promote important issues at Iowa Business Day on the Hill

Senior Vice President, Public Policy, ABI [email protected]

MARCH 1 Connecting Statewide Leaders Fairfield MARCH 12 Leadership Iowa Session V Fairfield MARCH 13 Iowa Business Day on the Hill ABI Office | Des Moines | 8:45 AM JUNE 57 Taking Care of Business Conference Coralville/Iowa City Visit www.iowaabi.org and click the “Events” tab for details on upcoming events.

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IOWA BUSINESS DAY ON THE HILL When: March 13, 2018 Where: ABI Office, 400 E. Court Ave., Des Moines Register: Visit www.iowaabi.org/events

Ask About Our Exclusive On Tuesday, March 13, participants will receive an update on activity at the Legislature before heading to the Capitol to meet with lawmakers. Legislators need to hear firsthand from employers and employees in their districts about how decisions being made at the Statehouse are affecting everyday Iowans. Join us March 13 to help educate Iowa’s elected officials on the issues important to Iowa businesses.

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Business Record IOWA | February 2018

Nicole Crain

The 2018 legislative session is a lile over one month old, and already many proposals have come forward that could affect Iowa businesses — both positive and negative. Iowa legislators need to hear from business leaders as they weigh these pieces of legislation. Iowa Business Day on the Hill offers a perfect opportunity to communicate with your legislators at the Statehouse next month. This year, ABI is partnering with other business organizations, including the National Federation of Independent Business of Iowa (NFIB), the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) and the Iowa Chamber Alliance, to host this event to provide both business leaders and lawmakers with even greater awareness of the issues affecting Iowa businesses. Those who aended last year’s event heard from legislative leaders about significant reforms that were being debated. Aendees also had the opportunity to advocate to their legislators about workers’ compensation reform, which ultimately passed the Iowa House and Senate and was signed by the governor a few weeks later. In addition to advocating for policies that promote more jobs and economic growth in Iowa, the day is an opportunity to celebrate and share the important role Iowa businesses play in their communities and the state.

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Business Record IOWA | February 2018

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Building Your Company’s Legacy Through Succession Planning You know how things work in terms of starting and running a successful business. You’ve hired the right people, offered a useful product or service and developed high-quality relationships with your customers and vendors. None of these things magically appeared out of thin air. You most likely followed a proven process, mixed in with your own creative problem solving, to build a successful business. The same adherence to process that applies to starting and running a successful business applies to a building a successful business succession plan and maintaining your legacy. Research shows only approximately 30 percent of all family-owned businesses survive into the second generation, and only 12 percent will survive into the third generation. Surprisingly, only 3 percent of all family businesses operate at the fourth generation and beyond. Of the 70 percent of businesses that fail to transition successfully, 60 percent fail due to problems with communication and trust. Twenty-five percent fail due to a lack of preparation from the next generation. Fieen percent fail from all other issues (e.g., poor tax or financial planning, legal advice, etc.). We oen hear owners say they want to transfer their businesses to third-party buyers when they first encounter the concept of succession planning in order to maximize their return. However, we’ve observed that in many circumstances, owners actually choose to transfer their businesses to employees or family members. Reasons for this decision include employees knowing the culture and values of the business, a desire to keep the business with people the owner knows and trusts, and employees’ inherent desire and commitment to grow the business. If a third-party sale is the strategy that’ll allow you to accomplish all of your established goals, you’ll need to prepare yourself and your company well in advance of the sale. If keeping the business in the family or with key employees is most important to you, prepare yourself, your company and your team for an insider transfer. You may want to investigate creative methods to finance a sale, make sure your chosen successor can run the business without you and avoid conflicts among business-active and non-businessactive children. Planning for your exit maximizes value, minimizes risk and keeps you in control until you’ve achieved financial security. Starting with a trusted team of advisers can go a long way toward helping meet your goals, answer questions and prepare your company for a successful transition that will preserve your legacy.

Brian Crotty Managing Director, HDH Advisors, LLC [email protected] hdhadvisorsllc.com

EXPERT ADVICE

There is Always More to the Story It is commonly believed that millennials hook up for the purpose of sex more frequently than preceding generations. This perception may come from the growing number of dating apps available and the large number of social media posts by millennials chronicling their sexual exploits. The facts tell a very different story. Things are not always as they appear to be. Gen Xers born in the late 1960s were more than twice as likely to have been sexually active as millennials born in the 1990s. Millennials who are sexually active have fewer partners than both Xers and boomers. The only generation comparable to millennials was born in the 1920s. When presented with only part of the story, why do we jump to conclusions? Why do we assume facts that are not in evidence? Why don’t we engage in conversations to learn more? Rarely do we have the entire story. We form our impressions and judgments of situations most often with incomplete information. To do this we rely on shortcuts. We take in the sensory data available, look for patterns, interpret what we see and add missing information for what we don’t. When faced with conflicting data and the inevitable incomplete story, we trust mostly what we see. Consider the following true story. A single mother was devoted to her only child, David. One day when David was a baby, his mother le him sleeping to go out and work in the garden. While she was in the garden, the house caught fire. Unconcerned with her own life and safety, she ran inside to save her son while witnesses to the event tried to hold her back.

Amazingly, she found David untouched and rescued him. During the rescue, her hair caught fire and burned her face, leaving horrific permanent scars. Despite growing up to become successful, David was always embarrassed by his mother’s appearance and would occasionally comment to others on her ugliness. When his mother heard this, she was saddened. She decided to confront him and tell him where the scars had come from. She was killed in a bus crash on her way to see David to tell him the truth. When searching through his mother’s belongings, he found her journal. It included the following entries: • September 5, 1980. I won the Miss Toronto Beauty Contest. • January 14, 1982. My husband, Tonny Gateson, passed away in a road accident while I was six months pregnant. • July 2, 1983. My face was scarred and I lost my hair saving my son, David, from a house fire. Should David be blamed for forming the impressions he held? Because he was short of complete information, he did what we all do. He pieced together the rest of the story and made a judgment. A decision he no doubt regrets. The tendency to jump to premature conclusions is part of human nature. When you remind yourself of this natural inclination, you can make different behavioral choices. Seek out the whole story and make a more informed decision.

Rowena Crosbie is president of Tero International, co-author of “Your Invisible Toolbox: The Technological Ups and Interpersonal Downs of the Millennial Generation” and co-host of the show “Your Invisible Toolbox.” Since 1993, Tero has earned a distinguished reputation as a premier research and corporate training company. Tero has been voted among the Best Training and Development Companies by readers of the Des Moines Business Record every year since the category was introduced in 2007.

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Business Record IOWA | February 2018

Giving you that extra oomph.

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AHEAD OF THE CURVE

ADVISORY COUNCIL STEVE CASSABAUM 21st Century Rehab

HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF IOWANS  VOLUNTEER WITH THE ABI FOUNDATION “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others?” — Martin Luther King Jr. Here in Iowa we have many outstanding organizations that serve the diverse needs of those in our communities and across the state. For many, if not all, of these organizations, volunteers play a profound role in the success of their efforts and are relied upon to help drive their missions forward. It can be difficult, however, for volunteers to select just one or two organizations to which to devote their limited “extra” hours in the day — hours that are not

already filled with the daily obligations of work and life. At the ABI Foundation, we are truly fortunate to work with an army of dedicated volunteers who make all the difference in the experiences and programs we offer year aer year. Volunteering with the ABI Foundation not only benefits our participants from across the state and all walks of life, but it also enriches the lives of those who choose to donate their time and talents to developing the future leaders of our state.

JIM NALLEY BCC Advisers

PAUL DREY Brick Gentry P.C. DEBI BULL BrownWinick Law Firm

MIKE O’DONNELL CIRAS

Jessi Steward Marketing and Programs Coordinator, ABI Foundation

JUSTIN ZIMMERMAN CliftonLarsonAllen

[email protected]

Here are FIVE ways you can benefit from a volunteer experience with the ABI Foundation: 1. Become a mentor. ABI Foundation program participants span a wide variety of geographic, socioeconomic, educational and personal backgrounds and aend our programs for a variety of reasons. Students may aend with hopes of gaining career experience, increasing their self-confidence, finding their strengths or simply stepping outside their comfort zone. No maer their background or reason for aending, all participants benefit greatly from role models who genuinely care about their future. Oentimes the mentorships formed last far beyond the program.

2. Broaden your perspective. The young people entering the workforce in the next few years are vastly different from those who entered five years ago. They will bring new knowledge and skills, as well as a unique mindset, to the workplace. Reach beyond the secondhand information and stereotypes and truly learn about our future workforce and all they can offer through firsthand interaction.

Business Record IOWA | February 2018

3. Represent your company. As a volunteer, you’re

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not only representing the professionals in our state, but you’re also representing your company — one of the many in Iowa that care and invest in the future of our young people. It’s no question a positive experience with a business at a young age can result in a student looking first to that same business when seeking an internship or job. Our participants are taking the time to proactively better themselves and prepare for a successful future. You would be hard-pressed to find a beer prospective candidate pool.

4. Connect with like-minded Iowa leaders. ABI Foundation volunteers are a connected team of professionals, young and veteran, who want to see our state grow by helping others succeed here in Iowa. While their job titles and backgrounds may be vastly different, our volunteers form longlasting friendships and expand their networks of trusted individuals who they can call upon for expertise in the future. 5. The opportunities are endless. It doesn’t take a certain job title or a large amount of time or funds to be involved in ABI Foundation programs. Our volunteers and supporters are entrepreneurs, engineers, financial advisers, educators and more. Volunteer opportunities range from an hour or two to multiple days or months. Sometimes all it takes is one conversation, one action or one individual willing to devote a few minutes to inspire greatness. One of the most valuable ways you can contribute to the ABI Foundation is by spreading the word to others about our programs. Please invite high school students, college students and adult professionals you know to learn more and take advantage of these unique opportunities available to Iowans. If you’re feeling inspired to give back to others, your community and the state, consider volunteering with the ABI Foundation or learning more about our programs. If you’re already an ABI Foundation volunteer — thank you. We are incredibly grateful for your support each year. We owe the success and impact of our programs to you. To learn more about our programs or volunteer opportunities, please visit www.IowaABIFoundation.org and contact us.

JEFF LESS EMC Insurance

MEGAN HORN Far Reach MICHAEL TEACHOUT Focus OneSource

BRIAN CROTTY HDH Advisors

JULI JENKINS LMC Insurance and Risk Management

LANCE GARDNER Principal

BRETT BURKHART Shi Interactive

ANN BLOCK Tero International

NATALIE SPITZIG The Iowa Clinic

GREG SHIREMAN Wellmark, Inc.

CASEY CASON Wells Fargo

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TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

THURSDAY

2nd Annual OpportUNITY Morning on the Hill

CFA Society Iowa luncheon

IOWA HEALTHIEST STATE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY

Accelerate Emerging Leaders Networking Event

About: Join OpportUNITY and United Way of Central Iowa to advance key policies that can help reduce barriers to self-sufficiency and increase opportunities for all central Iowans living in poverty. When: 7:30-9 a.m.

Where: Iowa State Capitol, Room 116

About: Doug Ommen, Iowa insurance commissioner and Nick Gerhart, chief administrative officer for FBL Financial Group and former Iowa insurance commissioner present “Everything You Wanted to Ask the Commissioner But Couldn’t.”

Host: Healthiest State Initiative About: Join as we recognize communities, workplaces, schools and Iowans for leading the efforts to improve the physical, social and emotional well-being of Iowans. You will walk away inspired to take action not only with your own health, but stepping up as a leader to improve the environment in which you live, learn, work and play.

Host: West Des Moines Chamber of Commerce

Where: Des Moines Embassy Club

When: 5-7 p.m. Where: Ron Pearson Conference Center

About: Chill out with a cold brew at the WDM Chamber’s next Accelerate happy hour event. Visit BeerStyles in West Glen to see what this gastropub has to offer while enjoying friendly conversation with fellow young professionals.

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2DzNgJ0

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2GhSpaD

When: 5-7 p.m.

When: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: BeerStyles

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2EaMkMp

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2FgCbgu

Suggest Events Want your event featured? Go to businessrecord.com/calendar

GOVERNOR’S Mid-Iowa Council Boy Scouts of America

LU N C H E O N F O R

SCOUTING 2018

On behalf of 40,000 Scouts, adult volunteers, and families, the Girl Scouts of Greater Iowa and Mid-Iowa Council, Boy Scouts of America wish to thank the sponsors of the 2018 Governor’s Luncheon for Scouting. Together with the generous gifts of hundreds of luncheon attendees, their support ensures that boys and girls from Ottumwa to Orange City and everywhere in between have access to life-changing leadership and outdoor experiences. Special thanks to: Governor Kim Reynolds; Lt. Governor Adam Gregg; Bankers Trust CEO & President and Event Chair, ,WV+W‫ٻ‬V; and Iowa State University Athletic Director and Keynote Speaker, Jamie Pollard.

Business Record | February 9, 2018

BUSINESS RECORD

Host: OpportUNITY and United Way of Central Iowa

Host: CFA Society Iowa

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C A L EN DAR

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NATIONAL

ENGINEERS WEEK special section

In 1951, the National Society of Professional

transportation, aviation, water, construction

Engineers started National Engineers Week

and geospatial. Currently, Foth’s Des Moines

in conjunction with George Washington’s

office is working on improvements to the Des

birthday. The week is a time to recognize the

Moines International Airport as well as road

contributions to society engineers make and

improvements throughout Iowa.

for engineers to emphasize the importance of learning math, science and technical skills.

The firm has been trying to take advantage of 3-D imaging, implementing that and virtual

Here are some of the Iowa companies and

reality into many of its projects. In addition to

organizations that focus on developing education

its work in infrastructure and other areas, Foth

and careers within the engineering industry.

is involved in many initiatives in the community, including financial contributions and gifts-

Business Record | February 9, 2018

Foth Engineering

20

in-kind. The firm has participated in the “Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day,” which

Now celebrating its 80th anniversary, Foth

takes place during National Engineers Week,

Engineering still employs the same values

as well as team participation in charitable runs

as when it opened in 1938. With special care

and walks, Adopt-a-Family programs and

placed on clients and employees, Foth has a

highway cleanup activities.

client retention rate of 99.4 percent and an employee retention rate of 95 percent.

“Our Des Moines office supports a number of initiatives to give back and support the

The firm offers services in three areas:

communities in which we live, work and play,”

environmental, infrastructure and production.

said Aaron Moniza, the lead civil engineer for

Foth’s infrastructure focus consists of planning,

Foth’s Des Moines office.

College of Engineering

» 12 engineering majors and 5 minors » Record enrollment of 9,669 students » Average 95% placement rate six months after graduation and average starting salary of $62,000 » Assisted 1,616 Iowa businesses generating an economic impact of $679 million » 300+ faculty dedicated to teaching, research and student achievement

» Provide statewide K-12 STEM outreach and training programs » More than $99 million spent on externally sponsored research » Internships, learning communities, study abroad, 80+ engineering organizations and hands-on experience help shape student success

Business Record | February 9, 2018

A prestigious engineering program is nothing without passion — inspiring future engineering leaders, pursuing groundbreaking research, transforming technology to make a difference, celebrating diversity of thought and culture, and creating solutions to make Iowa and the world a better place.

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in an Iowa State engineering education. The

An education at the Iowa State University

average placement rate six months after

College of Engineering, taught by 300 faculty,

graduation is 95 percent and the average salary

gives students the tools they need in an ever-

The Iowa State University College of

of a new grad is $62,000. That’s thanks, in part,

changing and constantly innovating world of

Engineering continues to grow every year

to the help of one of the largest engineering

engineering. The college works closely with its

and produce young and innovative minds into

career fairs in the nation.

Iowa State University College of Engineering

the Iowa workforce and around the globe. Just this past year, the college saw a record

Just last September, the college hosted 449

enrollment of 9,669 students, which is up 16.7

employers, a record, at Hilton Coliseum from

helps that more than 70 percent of engineering

percent in the past five years, making it the

across the country to help connect the 6,664

students graduate with some work experience.

seventh-largest undergraduate engineering

students who attended to internships, co-ops

program in the country.

and full-time employment. In the next three

“We are a prestigious engineering program

“Our students and graduates are successful because we teach the importance of thinking

took place on campus.

globally, being innovative and making a difference in the world,” Wilson said. “In addition

groundbreaking research, transforming

The college offers 12 engineering majors, five

technology to make a difference, celebrating

minors, 17 doctoral programs, 21 master degree

learning communities, study abroad, hands-on

diversity of thought and culture, and creating

programs and eight departmental and other

experience, research opportunities and more

to learning from renowned faculty — internships,

solutions to make Iowa and the world a

interdepartmental programs. The college’s

than 80 engineering-focused organizations/

better place,” said Ann Wilson, the director of

Department of Agriculture and Biosystems

clubs help shape student success.”

communications and college relations for the

Engineering undergraduate and graduate

engineering school.

programs are both ranked No. 1 by U.S. News

An Iowa State engineering education culminates

and World Report.

with a capstone project, which gives students

It’s no surprise why students are interested

Business Record | February 9, 2018

armed with the knowledge needed to succeed. It

days, 2,621 employer interviews with students inspiring future engineering leaders, pursuing

22

industry advisory council members, alumni and corporate partners to ensure graduates are

hands-on, real-world experience inside their

industry. The project, a requirement for all

than 9,000 K-12 students every year to create

Center, a 140,000-square-foot facility, is

undergraduate engineering students, has

awareness for young women.

scheduled to open in 2020. It will be used as a student-centered collaboration zone used by

industry and private sponsors, allowing students to make connections to potential employers.

“These programs help students — especially

engineering students and others.

young women — at an early age learn more about engineering and future careers,” Wilson said.

Beyond the classroom, the college, through various K-12 science, technology, engineering and mathematics outreach and training

The college has a heavy research focus, leading

programs, attempts to get children and

to more than $99 million spent on externally

teachers involved with potential future careers

sponsored research in 2017. The research covers

in engineering.

a wide range of topics, but some of the signature areas are on the cutting edge of technology,

One program, the Program for Women

like advanced materials and manufacturing,

in Science and Engineering (WiSE), aims

energy systems, engineered medicine, secure

to increase the number of women in the

cyberspace, and resilient infrastructures.

engineering workforce. The program was started at Iowa State in 1986 because of the faculty’s

“Engineering research plays a transformational

concerns about women underrepresentation in

role in determining the well-being of our planet

the fields of engineering and science.

and the prosperity of our people,” Wilson said.

That issue is still prevalent today. Women make

There are some exciting developments

The Iowa State University College of

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Engineering staff assists businesses across the state through its Center for Industrial Research and Service (CIRAS). The center assists Iowa businesses in the engineering industry with areas such as financial performance, engineering capabilities, manufacturing excellence and team performance. Last year, CIRAS assisted 1,616 businesses throughout the state, generating an economic impact of $679 million and 5,741 jobs added or retained. The Iowa State University College of Engineering is just one piece of the puzzle for the college experience. The entire university

up about 29 percent of the college workforce,

happening at the Iowa State University

has many ways for students to get involved,

according to a study by the National Girls

College of Engineering within the next few

make new friends and explore opportunities

Collaborative. This program reaches more

years as well. The new Student Innovation

beyond classwork. The campus has 1,900 acres

I O WA D E PA R T M E N T O F

DISCOVER YOUR DREAM JOB www.iowadot.gov/careers

Business Record | February 9, 2018

T R A NSP OR TAT ION

23

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of impressive architecture and plenty of green

“We provide our services through exceptional

Through projects like the Ames and

space to enjoy, as well as one of the largest

client service, exhaustive project discovery

public art collections in the country.

and visionary solutions to foster lasting,

Fox served as lead engineer, as well as various

collaborative relationships with clients, resulting

storm drainage improvements and watershed

Marshalltown water treatment plants, where

in projects that stand out and stand up to the

improvements, FOX Engineering tackles

test of time,” said Holly Elbert, a partner at the

projects with a quality-driven, client-based and

With a rich history that spans more than

firm. “We do repeat work with many of our

forward-thinking approach.

120 years in Iowa, BBS Architects|Engineers,

clients, and the buildings we design are long-

formerly known as Brooks Borg Skiles, renamed

lasting and recognizable.”

BBS Architects|Engineers

its firm and moved offices to 219 Eighth St. in downtown Des Moines, right along the revitalized Walnut Street, this past year. The new office is housed within a building designed by the firm for EMC Insurance Cos. The move hasn’t changed the ultimate goal for

“We are sought out for our innovative designs in these areas and for our work with plant

The firm takes great pride in the fact that the

operators to ensure their suggestions are

majority of its work is in Iowa and particularly in

incorporated into the finished product,” said

the Central Iowa region.

Keith Hobson, president of FOX Engineering. “We provide highly technical solutions to some

“We take pride in designing buildings in our local community and home state,” Cole said.

very complex issues. We accomplish this by collaborating closely with staff from the cities and industries that we work with.”

the firm: to continue providing innovative and creative services to its customers.

FOX Engineering

BBS Architects|Engineers provides a wide

FOX Engineering is celebrating its 25th year

range of services in-house — from architecture

of helping cities and industries provide clean

limits that require more advanced treatment

to electrical and mechanical engineering to

water through its specialization in water and

and innovative solutions to provide reliable

facility assessment. It also offers interior design

wastewater treatment.

The water treatment industry has seen new water contaminants and lower regulatory

facilities at a lower cost. FOX Engineering, armed with highly trained engineers, has

and master planning.

Resourceful. Business Record | February 9, 2018

Responsive | Reliable

24

50+ YEARS OF DATA AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. We develop a customized approach to your project Nine offices serving Iowa Des Moines (515) 244 3184 terracon.com

based on more than 50 years worth of geotechnical data collected through our history, available digitally.

Environmental

Facilities

Geotechnical

Materials

learned to adapt to each unique situation and

water and wastewater engineering, roadway

provide cost-effective solutions.

design, traffic engineering, aviation and

“We are problem solvers by nature, and through our work in Iowa we have become

Iowa Department of Transportation

environment permitting, and has been

The Iowa Department of Transportation is

consistently ranked among the top firms by

dedicated to its mission of getting you there safely, conveniently and efficiently. From

leading industry publications.

getting Iowans out of the mud in the 1920s to

known as water and wastewater experts called upon to provide solutions to difficult

As clients place a bigger importance on water

situations,” Hobson said.

quality in streams and rivers, HDR has been at the

horizon, the Iowa DOT relies on its No. 1 asset:

forefront of helping them through these issues.

the agency’s nearly 2,800 employees. Although

preparing for the driverless technologies on the

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the agency is headquartered in Ames, the

HDR

“Our water clients are dealing with more

HDR, a Nebraska-based company, is relatively new in the Des Moines scene, opening an office in the city in 2006. But since then, the office has employed 23 people and made a large impact on the Greater Des Moines area and the state of Iowa.

nitrates and pollutants in their source water,

Iowa DOT employs hundreds of engineers in locations around the state.

our wastewater clients are planning for ways to achieve the goals of the Iowa Nutrient

With nearly 10,000 miles of Iowa highways,

Reduction Strategy, and many of our clients

there’s never a shortage of projects to sustain

are looking for ways to enhance recreation

both current and future transportation needs.

and economic development opportunities

From soils design, which provides the best

along the riverfronts,” said Brian Bakke, a water

foundation for our highways, to designing and

Current projects the firm is working on include

marketing manager with HDR. “Identifying

constructing safer interchanges and bridges,

the Ames Water Treatment Plant and the

projects and funding sources to provide

the agency is a national leader in transportation

Northeast Mixmaster Systems Interchange

multiple benefits to all of these client goals is

problem solving.

in Des Moines, among others. The company

important for us moving forward.” “What sets us apart is our focus on people,” said

offers services in water resources engineering,

Iowa DOT Director Mark Lowe. “Everything

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Business Record | February 9, 2018

Join us in thanking engineers for making a difference in our communities.

25

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we do is directed toward making life better for

have access to accomplished professionals who

driven approach to business. MEC’s wide range

others, which we take very seriously. While our

mentor them in their field of study.

of expertise has allowed it to push boundaries

tasks are very serious, we have some fun along the way and encourage a culture of discovery and innovation among our people.” The Iowa DOT offers a robust internship and co-op program that provides engineering

and bring unique solutions to projects. “As we move through the needs of our days, we don’t always have the time to explore different

The firm is a trusted adviser in the fields of

ways of doing things,” said Michelle Barger, an

agricultural drainage, aviation, civil, construction

Iowa DOT chemist who works with the interns.

administration, placemaking, planning,

“Finding interns who have the ability and

land development, rail, survey, structural,

students with unparalleled hands-on

interest to take on this challenge means we

opportunities that allow them to apply

can move forward with our technology and get

transportation and water.

the principles they have learned in the

work done in new, innovative and often more

classroom to a real-world setting. In turn,

efficient ways.”

“We know the importance of every project as a catalyst for building strong communities and making lives better,” said Paul Trombino III,

students often bring a fresh perspective to the DOT that contributes new ideas

Whether a seasoned engineer is just embarking

and helps explore creative solutions to

on a career in civil, environmental, mechanical,

president for McClure Engineering Company. The history gives MEC a comprehensive

old problems. The DOT hires about 65

structural or construction engineering, the DOT

engineering students each summer to work

offers an opportunity for them to start a career

understanding of Iowa, where it has seven

on a variety of projects statewide.

and build skill sets for the future.

of its 10 office locations, but it doesn’t stop the firm from innovating to create a better

Iowa DOT interns and co-op students are finding fulfilling and career-altering opportunities far

experience for clients. MEC is one of the

McClure Engineering Company

leading firms in the industry in augmented

beyond work that may be associated with

McClure Engineering Company (MEC) has 62

traditional internships. Students work on real-

years of history in Iowa, a credit to its people-

reality (AR) engineering applications, which are used across all its services.

world projects that are often highly visible and

Environmental Engineering

Geotechnical Engineering

Celebrating Engineer’s Week

Construction Materials Testing

Business Record | February 9, 2018

February 18-24

26

Proud to play a role in raising Des Moines’ iconic Red Bridge

515.246.8585 www.stanleyconsultants.com

Commercial Retaining Wall Systems

Your First Call When Project Timelines are Tight 515-986-3013 | www.thielegeotech.com

to pursue AEC industry careers. The program’s

need to be able to continue to be the ones to

clients in the use of AR engineering services,”

goal is to help build an industry workforce for

say, ‘yes, we can,’ to the work our clients and

Trombino said. “In the near term, augmented

the future.

communities need.”

engineering disciplines to deliver increased

From 2012 to 2022, building and infrastructure

ACE mentors like to demonstrate the range

cost-effective solutions.”

jobs are projected to grow by thousands of

of opportunities within their individual careers.

additional workers. However, there will be a

Adam Puls, a Shive-Hattery mechanical

reality engineering services will allow all

MEC also is an industry leader in remote

need to replace almost one-quarter of the

engineer, volunteers as a mentor to educate

sensing technology, which includes its

current workforce due to retirements and

students about his field.

unmanned aerial systems (UAS) services.

other employment shifts. It is estimated that

The UAS allows for quick, cost-effective and

five AEC professionals will exit the workforce

safe data collection on active sites, while

for every one entering, according to a 2012

was the least advertised,” Puls said. “Without a

also providing a three-dimensional site and

Brooking Institute analysis of U.S. employment

personal connection to the industry, it would have

building maps to project stakeholders.

data. This forecasted worker shortage inspired

been my junior or senior year before I realized the

Shive-Hattery Architecture and Engineering to

construction industry was a viable option.

“When I was in college, my branch of engineering

sponsor ACE.

Shive-Hattery, Inc.

“I share the story that I and my two best mechanical engineering friends from college

“Firms like ours work hard to attract and keep

The ACE Mentor Program of America Inc. is a fast-growing program, reaching more than

talented professionals,” said Tom Bosch, office

8,000 high school students annually. Architects,

director and vice president of Shive-Hattery.

engineers and construction (AEC) professionals

work in the construction industry, plastic injection molding and pet food processing.”

“As an ACE sponsor, we are doing our part to

Added Puls: “I think it expresses the variety

volunteer their time as ACE mentors in this

get students into the industry so we’ll have

of work opportunities available by studying

16-week program designed to inspire students

the workforce we’ll need in the future. We

mechanical engineering.”

Ideas transform communities We’re proud to celebrate Engineers Week with the friends and partners who make great things possible in this community we call home. Celebrating Engineers Week February 18-24, 2018 hdrinc.com

515.280.8022 • tometichengineering.com

Business Record | February 9, 2018

“MEC sees immense opportunities for our

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Ankeny High School sophomore and student

The firm specializes in transportation, municipal,

participant Liam Gossman said ACE gives him

water, public spaces, land development and

an in-depth look at different jobs and their

structural services. Recent project experience

Stanley Consultants, an Iowa-based consulting

specific tasks.

includes the diverging diamond interchange in

engineering firm founded in 1913, has offices

“ACE has given me a realistic idea about what

Ankeny. Currently under construction, it’s the

in Des Moines, Muscatine, Iowa City and

second interchange of its kind in the state of Iowa.

Cedar Rapids. Exceptional service, quality and strong client relationships have helped

engineers do and how they interact with each other to complete a project,” Gossman said. “It

Stanley Consultants

“We have a great desire to find the best

Stanley Consultants become a leader in the

definitely helped cement my career choices by

solutions for the challenges our clients face,”

infrastructure and utilities markets. For more

exposing me to the thought lines and creativity

said President Dave Moeller. “We take pride in

than 100 years the firm has had a definitive

of engineering.”

our work and have a lot of fun along the way.”

focus on answering the world’s engineering challenges in power, water, transportation,

Moeller says the firm values a long-term

Snyder & Associates

industry energy and the environment.

project approach that facilitates growth through planning to produce lasting results.

Des Moines’ iconic Red Bridge, located just

With an emphasis on creative, sustainable and

south of Court Avenue, presented one such

economical design solutions, they strive to

challenge. In 2006, Stanley Consultants

ensure their work performs for years to come.

rehabilitated what was then an abandoned

throughout the Midwest and nationwide

By providing the responsive, personal service

stunning pedestrian bridge. Fast-forward to 2010: An updated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Forty years since its inception, Snyder & Associates has grown to become one of the largest civil engineering and planning firms in Iowa. Snyder & Associates serves clients

railroad bridge and transformed it into a

with seven office locations in Iowa and five

of a small firm while utilizing the expertise of

additional offices in Missouri, Nebraska, South

over 250 professionals, 94 percent of Snyder &

Dakota and Wisconsin.

report indicated the Red Bridge could

Associates’ clients continue to trust the firm as

contribute to flooding in downtown Des Moines.

an extension of their staff.

WATER | WASTEWATER | MUNICIPAL

Business Record | February 9, 2018

800.433.3469 | www.foxeng.com

28

A proud supporter of MathCounts© and Children's Water Festival, FOX encourages young people to explore one of the most exciting careers in the world — engineering.

Des Moines asked Stanley Consultants to

and technicians have over 830 years of

being a strong part of the community with team

prepare a feasibility study on two options:

combined experience in the industry.

members that sit on boards such as Orchard

bridge’s rich history and popularity led the city

The firm has a wide array of equipment on the

American Heart Association Go Red, West Des

to spare it from demolition.

cutting edge of technology that helps its well-

Moines Leadership Academy, and Leadership

seasoned engineers complete projects that

Education and Advancement Pipeline.”

Place, CREW Iowa, Girl Scouts of Central Iowa,

demolish the bridge or elevate it. Ultimately the

Raising the 126-year-old bridge up by 4½

precision and timeliness that customers rave

feet proved challenging. Stanley Consultants

about. Thiele Geotech has experience in many

prepared design drawings and specifications.

different areas, like office buildings, airports,

Completed in 2017, this $2.5 million project

schools, state parks, military installations and

saved an iconic downtown gathering spot,

multifamily developments.

reduced flooding of some of the state’s most valuable commercial properties and preserved

“Thiele Geotech is best known for our large-

Terracon Throughout its more than 50 years in existence, Terracon has strived to push the boundaries and continue to innovate to provide safer and

an important historical landmark from the

scale experience with excavations, foundations,

more vibrant communities. The 100 percent

golden age of railroading in Iowa.

structural steel, post-tensioned and slabs-

employee-owned consulting engineering firm

on-deck, elevator shafts, fireproofing, floor

that started in Iowa in 1965 and now has more

flatness and ground penetrating radar,” said

than 140 offices nationwide and employs more

Jackie Johansen, who was recently hired to

than 3,500 people.

Thiele Geotech Thiele Geotech, founded more than 20 years ago, has completed thousands of projects that

strategically grow the Des Moines market. “Bringing Jackie onto the team was a natural

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Terracon’s rich history has created plenty of information on details of past projects. But now with a big data boom hitting every industry

have helped shape the landscape of the cities of

fit with her reputation and relationships in

its two regional offices; Des Moines and Omaha.

commercial real estate,” said President Bob

in a variety of ways, Terracon has focused its

The team of engineers, geologists, geophysicists

Lapke. “And the Thiele team is committed to

attention on digitizing that data.

219 Eighth Street Suite 100 Des Moines, IA 50309 www.bbsae.com

ARCHITECTURE | MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING FACILITY ASSESSMENT | INTERIOR DESIGN | MASTER PLANNING

Business Record | February 9, 2018

1HZRƯFH1HZORRN6DPHFRPPLWPHQW

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Today, there is a wealth of information

year ago and No. 58 more than a decade ago.

about subsurface geology, hydrogeology

Terracon serves the commercial and retail

possibilities of [the internet of things] and

and geotechnical characteristics online.

development industry, transportation, state and

determining how to get more efficiency out of

Governmental agencies are using tax dollars

local government, and the energy, industrial,

existing systems is of the utmost importance.”

to great benefit by sharing what they already

health care and telecommunications industries,

know about the subsurface.

among others.

available technologies, understanding the

HR Green is fully involved in developing engineers for the future. The firm participates

Terracon has jumped on that big data trend and

The company hires engineers across a wide

has created a geographic information system

range of disciplines. Some of the specializations

internships, school-to-work programs and

(GIS) to house personalized data from its more

include environmental, facilities, geotechnical

career fairs.

than 50 years of service. The firm is investing

and materials services for private and public

about $2 million per year to ensure it has greater

sector clients.

in career development through job shadows,

The firm is currently working on various

access to a wealth of its own data. Because of

projects in the Des Moines area, including

this digitization push, Terracon can mine its own

Veterans Parkway; the 35/80/141 interchange

HR Green

data in a matter of seconds, rather than hours, and make informed decisions quicker.

HR Green is one of the longest-operating

in Urbandale, the Hamilton Drain project; and various critical stormwater pump stations.

engineering firms in the nation. Tracing its history

Since the firm has such a wide array of clients

back to 1913, the firm offers a wide array of

and projects, its data is completely unique from

Tometich

engineering services in the water, transportation,

any other company. Terracon can produce

governmental services, land development,

informed decisions before going into the field

environmental and construction realms.

or using a piece of equipment. Sid Juwarker, the

Tometich Engineering has given competent and concise engineering services to Central Iowa since James Tometich established the firm in 1992.

client development manager for the firm’s Des

The firm prides itself on being on the front end

Moines office, said it amounts to about $1 billion

of critical infrastructure needs. Ellen Swanson,

The firm specializes in structural engineering

worth of data.

HR Green’s Marketing Director, said the Des

consulting — taking an idea from concept to

Moines metro’s population is projected to jump

construction — as well as failure investigations

to one million from 650,000 by 2040. For that

and expert witness testifying in lawsuits

“We have over 50 years of useful local knowledge from working with clients all over the country in one convenient and instantly accessible location,” Juwarker said. “No one else has that volume or coverage of data.”

work with contractors, developers and owners

improved. HR Green is dedicated to being a

to help ensure the buildings, bridges and other

leader in this work for its clients.

structures the firm designs are safe, economic

“We are focused on helping clients determine

serve customers with imaginative and innovative

the best options for themselves and to develop

solutions. Those core values have vaulted the firm to near the top of the ranks among international companies. The firm was ranked No. Top 500 Design Firms. That’s up from No. 32 a

regarding structure failure. Tometich also can

needs to be examined, replaced, enhanced and

and constructible.

Terracon has used the GIS system to continue to

30 in Engineering News-Record’s 2017 list of the

to happen seamlessly, critical infrastructure

Tometich has worked on many projects

solutions to challenges that are the right fit,”

in Central Iowa — the East Village Square

Swanson said. “Clients are concerned about

Apartments in downtown Des Moines, the

how to do more with less, protect investments

Holiday Inn Suites in West Des Moines and

and address efficiencies. Investigations into

the Woodward-Granger High School addition, among many others — as well as in other states, including Wisconsin, Nebraska and Texas. The organization participates extensively in the

Business Record | February 9, 2018

Architecture, Construction and Engineering

30

(ACE) Mentor Program of Central Iowa in both

ENGINEERING

mentor and executive board roles. It takes

INNOVATION THROUGH

pride in hiring high school students as summer interns to expose them to the industry while also helping in the Waukee and Johnston school districts.

SCIENCE. ART. BUSINESS.

“Engineering is a great career to be a part of,” said

Mechanical

“Chances for solving problems in creative ways

//

Electrical

//

Plumbing

//

Fire Protection

Brant Bristow, principal at Tometich Engineering. are found within each and every project.”

ALVI NE . CO M

DAVE ELBERT

Do the math on water quality The water quality bill passed by the Iowa Legislature is a joke. A lile math shows how big the joke really is. The bill provides $13 million a year for just 12 years. At that rate it will take more than 300 years to solve what experts say is a $4 billion to $6 billion problem. Three hundred years is a long time. Three hundred years ago there was no United States. The only white people who had been to Iowa were French explorers Jacques Marquee and Louis Jolliet and a handful of fur traders. The legislators who passed Iowa’s “clean water” bill were what my high school basketball coach, Cecil Spatcher, called “gutless wonders” — players with no plan who lob the ball at the basket whenever they feel like it. Gutless wonders don’t win basketball games, and they can’t clean up our water. This is not a new problem. We’ve known about it all of my adult life. The first evidence of what we now call the “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico was reported by shrimp trawlers in the 1950s. No one much cared until the 1970s when scientists determined that the problem was caused by runoff of fertilizer and other chemicals from farm fields.

They said that many of those farm fields were in Iowa, which comprises only 5 percent of the Mississippi River drainage basin but provides roughly 25 percent of the nitrate flow into the Gulf of Mexico. Even worse, the nitrate pollution flowing out of the Raccoon River watershed, which ends in Des Moines, is among the highest in the United States. That’s why Des Moines Water Works director Bill Stowe raised a ruckus about outdated farming practices in upstream river basins. At this point, it is pointless to assign blame. Virtually every person who lives in Iowa has done something to contribute to the problem. Most did it unknowingly, like my grandfather who tiled his fields in Kossuth County back in the 1920s to convert them from marshy wetlands to some of the most productive farmland in the world. At the time, there was no way he could have known that he was also building a superhighway for transporting nitrogen runoff all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. He just wanted to get the standing water out of his fields. John J. Elbert died in 1927. He never saw the impact that mechanization had on farming. As tractors got bigger and combines were in-

• Business Record columnist • Email: [email protected] • Phone: (515) 988-3787 © 2018 Business Record

troduced, their perpetual churning of the land loosened the soil to the point where too much of it ran easily into rivers when it rained and ended up in the Gulf of Mexico. To slow soil erosion, farmers applied more fertilizer, which also helped crop yields. At the time, we did not realize that our abundance was slowly suffocating life downstream. Today, we are rapidly approaching a tipping point. We don’t have centuries or even decades to fix the problem. We need to begin reversing the process, and we need to do it now. A majority of Iowans already paved the way by passing a constitutional amendment eight years ago to establish the Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Trust Fund. The amendment requires that the next time the sales tax is raised, the first three-eighths of a penny be dedicated to the fund. All lawmakers have to do is pull the trigger on this preapproved tax increase and $180 million a year is available to begin solving the problem. When you do the math, $4 billion divided by $180 million is roughly two decades, which is a lot more reasonable than 300 years. „

Gutless wonders don’t win basketball games, and they can’t clean up our water.

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THE ELBERT FILES

MARKETING

Social media is a powerful tool, but it can also hand a brand some serious problems that need to be dealt with immediately. When you respond in real time, you can do it well, or you can stumble and fall. When a brand doesn’t deal with the ember or spark or handles it badly, it can quickly grow to an inferno. We watched the good and bad of that play out over the past couple of weeks, and I’d like to dig a lile deeper into each situation and then talk about some safety nets we all need to have in place in case our company finds itself in an unexpected spotlight. This week let’s look at the good. The very popular show “This Is Us” killed off a beloved character a couple of weeks ago. The culprit? A house fire started by a crockpot’s faulty switch. People rushed to social media to mourn the death of this character, and true to human nature, were looking for someone to blame, and the poor crockpot took the brunt of it. I know it sounds ridiculous, but the buildup to how Jack died had been in the making for over two years. This is a show that pokes at the most sensitive emotions of its viewers, and so their hearts were definitely on their sleeve already, as they watched the tragedy unfold. As the TV show ended and the fans scrambled to social media to give Crock-Pot a piece of

their mind, the company found themselves in a very bizarre and unexpected position. They were being accused of causing the death of a pretend person. People were vowing to throw away their crockpots. Crock-Pot had three choices. They could respond to the overwhelming wave of communication by reminding everyone that Jack is pretend, they could ignore the whole thing and let it blow over, or they could play along and use the opportunity to build their brand. Their first tweet was: “We’re heartbroken over last night’s episode, too! But don’t worry, you can still make your favorite meals in your #CrockPot with confidence. We want to assure all consumers we rigorously test our products for safety. DM us and we’d be happy to tell you more about our safety standards.” Think this is absurd? It gets worse. The story of the killer Crock-Pot was also picked up on Colbert, Marketplace, and even Popular Science and Self magazines! Crock-Pot took to Facebook as well, with this message: “THIS IS US’ SPOILER ALERT. We’re still trying to mend our broken heart aer watching ‘This Is Us’ on Tuesday night. America’s favorite dad and husband deserved a beer exit and

© 2018 Drew McLellan

Crock-Pot® shares in your devastation. Don’t further add to this tragedy by throwing your Crock-Pot Slow Cooker away. It’s hard to pass something down from generation to generation if you throw it away (grandma won’t be too happy). Spending time with his family while enjoying comfort food from his Crock-Pot was one of his favorite things to do. Let’s all do our part and honor his legacy in the kitchen with Crock-Pot®.XOXO, Crock-Pot® Forever in Your Heart & Forever in Your Home” It’s bad enough when your company makes an actual mistake or deserves the heat of social media, but this example is a good reminder that we’re all vulnerable, even when it’s not of your creation. Next week we’re going to take a look at a situation close to home that was of their creation — the Old Navy racial profiling story that went viral and caused the store to close its doors temporarily. Aer we have studied both the good and the bad, I’ll outline the best practices we need to keep in mind as we do business in this 24/7 connected world. „

Watch how NBC rushed to Crock-Pot’s aid when they realized they’d unintentionally thrown the brand into the fire with Jack. Too soon?

Business Record | February 9, 2018

A tale of two reactions

DREW McLELLAN • Top Dog at McLellan Marketing Group • Blog: www.drewsmarketingminute.com • Email: [email protected]

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CITY ORDINANCES ORDINANCE NO. 15,639 AN ORDINANCE to amend the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, adopted by Ordinance No. 13,827, passed June 5, 2000, as heretofore amended, by amending Section 2-201, relating to powers and duties of the city manager. Be It Ordained by the City Council of the City of Des Moines, Iowa: Section 1. That the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, adopted by Ordinance No. 13,827, passed June 5, 2000, as heretofore amended, is hereby amended by amending Section 2-201, relating to powers and duties of the city manager, as follows: Sec. 2-201. Powers and duties. (a) The city manager shall be the administrative head of the municipal government and shall have and exercise all the powers and perform all the duties prescribed by I.C. § 372.1 et seq., except as otherwise provided by ordinance, resolution, or motion of the city council. Except as otherwise provided in this Code or by state law, the city manager shall have the power and duty to provide for the issuance and revocation of such licenses and permits as are authorized by law or ordinance. The manager shall supervise and administer the offices of economic development and public affairs. (b) The city manager or his or her designee may, in his or her discretion, execute right of entry and access agreements for and on behalf of the city, granting access to specified city property to persons for various purposes, including but not limited to property surveys, soil testing, grading, filling, construction staging activities, and access to city property outside of street and alley right-of-way for purposes of conducting environmental assessment or remediation activities, all in support of public or private projects, provided that such agreements shall be subject to review and approval by the legal department. Access to city property within city street and alley right-of-way for purposes of conducting environmental assessment or remediation activities shall be granted pursuant to the requirements of division 2 of article XI of chapter 102 of this Code. The city manager shall develop a schedule of reasonable charges for the grant of access to city property, provided that such charges shall be waived when such access is sought by a governmental entity or by a contractor or consultant engaged in work on behalf of a governmental entity. (c) The city manager or his or her designee may, in his or her discretion, execute right of entry and access agreements for and on behalf of the city to secure access to private property or property owned by other governmental entities by city personnel or city contractors or consultants for the performance of required activities thereon in support of city projects or operations, provided that the compensation paid by the city for such access does not exceed $25,000.00 and provided that such agreements shall be subject to review and approval by the legal department. (d) The city manager or his or her designee may, in his or her discretion, execute temporary easements for construction and demolition and temporary backslope and property adjustment easements, for and on behalf of the city, to secure access to private property or property owned by other governmental entities by city personnel or city contractors as needed in support of the construction, repair, or replacement of public improvements, provided that the compensation paid by the city for each such temporary easement does not exceed $25,000.00 and provided that such temporary easements shall be subject to review and approval by the legal department. (e) The city manager or his or her designee may, in his or her discretion, execute the following types of real estate documents for and on behalf of the city, provided that such documents have been reviewed and approved by the legal department: (1) Documents releasing tenant’s interests, or involving other temporary property interests, including maintain vacancy agreements and rental agreements, in support of the construction, demolition, repair or replacement of public improvements, provided that the compensation paid by the city under such real estate documents does not exceed $25,000.00; (2) Documents involving initial and renewal lease agreements for terms of less than three (3) years for the lease of city-owned property that is not needed for municipal purposes during the lease term; (3) Acceptance of any deed, easement, cov-

enant, or other interest in real estate conveyed to the city, provided that the compensation paid by the city under such real estate document does not exceed $25,000; and (4) Documents releasing the city’s interest in promissory notes and loan agreements for loans given by the city and administered by the city’s office of economic development or the neighborhood conservation services division of the community development department, and in mortgages, deeds of trust, and similar liens given as security for such loans, in the event that the underlying loan has been paid in full in accordance with the terms thereof. Notwithstanding the foregoing, execution of documents releasing the city’s interest that involve partial or full loan forgiveness or amended loan or collateral terms require prior city council approval by resolution. (5) Documents subordinating the city’s interest under subordinate mortgages and liens on private property and amendments thereto, to allow the refinancing of the senior mortgages and liens on such property when the city manager determines it to be in the city’s interest and without material impact on the city’s security interest in the property for proper and timely performance of the property owner’s obligations to the city. (6) Documents consenting to the assignment of all or some portion of the owner’s interest in a contract with the city for economic assistance for the development or redevelopment of the owner’s property, and to the assignment of all or some portion of the owner’s interest in such property, when the city manager determines it to be in the city’s interest and without material impact on the city’s security interest in such property for proper and timely performance of the owner’s obligations to the city. (7) Documents representing or certifying to a third party that, except as specifically noted in the document, the city has no knowledge or record that another party to a contract, lease or other agreement with the city is in default or noncompliant with such contract, lease or agreement, when the city manager determines it to be in the city’s interest to make such representation or certification. (8) Documents consenting to the lessee’s assignment of its interest in a lease for city property. (9) Documents releasing the city’s easement interest in a property, provided city staff has determined said easement interest is no longer needed and the fair market value paid to the city for the release of said easement interest does not exceed $25,000. (f) The city manager or his or her designee may, in his or her discretion, make application and/or execute licenses, easements or agreements for the grant to the city of crossing rights for municipal utilities or facilities in railroad rights-of-way, as provided in section 476.27(2) (b) of the 2001 Code of Iowa and in the rules promulgated pursuant thereto, provided that the compensation paid by the city for such rights does not exceed $25,000 and provided that such documents shall be subject to review and approval by the legal department. Section 2. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. FORM APPROVED: Lisa A. Wieland, Assistant City Attorney T. M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true copy of an ordinance (Roll Call No. 18-0135), passed by the City Council of said City at a meeting held January 22, 2018 signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018 and published and provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by Publication Order No. 10215. Diane Rauh, City Clerk ORDINANCE NO. 15,640 AN ORDINANCE to amend the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, adopted by Ordinance No. 13,827, passed June 5, 2000, as heretofore amended, by amending Section 78-67, relating to application for a transient merchant premises permit. Be It Ordained by the City Council of the City of Des Moines, Iowa: Section 1. That the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, adopted by Ordinance No. 13,827, passed June 5, 2000, as heretofore amended, is hereby amended by amending Section 78-67, relating to relating to application for a transient merchant premises permit, as follows:

Sec. 78-67. Application for a transient merchant premises permit. At least three business days prior to allowing a transient merchant or mobile food vender, currently licensed by the city, to operate on premises within the city, an owner or lessee of the premises must obtain a transient merchant premises permit from the city clerk. The application for the permit must be on a form provided by the city clerk and must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the city clerk and the zoning administrator that the premises meet the following requirements: (1) All applicable requirements of this article, the City Code, the Iowa Code and the Iowa Administrative Code. (2) The premises is within a commercial or industrial zoning district. (3) The premises is not on a parcel having a residential use as its principle use. (4) Trailers, vehicles, tents, equipment, and areas used for the storage, display or sale of food or merchandise will be located only on a paved surface outside required zoning setback for structures under chapter 134 and outside any required fire lanes and drive approaches. (5) The premises has at least three paved offstreet parking spaces dedicated to the transient merchant or mobile vender operations and is served by a paved driveway from a public right-of-way. Property located in C-3, C-3A, C-3B, C-3R and D-R zoning districts are exempt from the off-street parking requirement. For purposes of this subsection, a transient merchant or mobile vender may share parking with an existing business on the site only if available parking is sufficient to serve the normal operations of both. If the operation of a transient merchant or mobile vender at the site has caused an overflow of customer or employee parking into the street or other private parking lots in the vicinity within the past year, shared parking is presumed to be insufficient. (6) The premises must have a dumpster enclosure unless the premises is legally in use by a licensed transient merchant on the effective date of this amendment, in which case a dumpster enclosure must be provided within one year after the issuance of a premises permit. The requirement for a dumpster enclosure may be waived if permit holder can establish to the satisfaction of the neighborhood inspection zoning administrator that it has a non-residential alternative location for taking its garbage. (7) Only one transient merchant or mobile vender currently licensed by the city is allowed to operate on the parcel at any time. (8) The permit holder must provide a paved area for display and sale by the transient merchant. This provision does not apply to premises that are covered by a valid transient merchant license on the effective date of this ordinance if a premises permit is applied for on or before the expiration of the existing transient merchant license. This exemption terminates when a premises permit is not timely renewed or is denied for any reason. The owner of the premises must comply with all zoning requirements relating to the premises. (9) If the transient merchant or mobile vender is selling or serving food, the premises must also: a. Assure that the transient merchant or mobile vender complies with the requirements established by Iowa Administrative Code §481-31 for a food establishment other than a food processing plant. b. Provide bathroom facilities for the business workers and customers on the licensed premises or by agreement for the use of bathroom facilities located within a reasonable distance from the licensed facilities that are open the same hours as the transient merchant or mobile vendor. c. The premises must not be located within 100 feet of any public entrance into the waiting of service area of any street level restaurant operating on the date of the application. This provision does not apply to premises permits issued to locations at which any transient merchant is legally operating within a 100 feet of an existing restaurant on the effective date of this ordinance; however, this provision applies if a permit lapses for any period of time or if a restaurant subsequently begins operations within 100 feet of the premises, then this provision applies to all future applications. Section 2. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. FORM APPROVED: Thomas G. Fisher Jr., Assistant City Attorney T. M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor

Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true copy of an ordinance (Roll Call No. 18-0137), passed by the City Council of said City at a meeting held January 22, 2018 signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018 and published and provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by Publication Order No. 10215. Diane Rauh, City Clerk SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 15.641 AN ORDINANCE to amend the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, adopted by Ordinance No. 13,827, passed June 5, 2000, as heretofore amended, by amending Chapter 114 Traffic & Vehicle Regulations, by amending Sections 114-2720, 114-2806, 114-2810, 1143331, 114-3445 and 114-3631, as summarized below. The complete text of the ordinance is available between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. in the City of Des Moines City Clerk’s Office, 400 East Court Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa, or on the City of Des Moines’ website at www.dmgov.org. The ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. DES MOINES TRAFFIC REGULATION CHANGES Amending Chapter 114 of the Municipal Code regarding traffic regulation changes as follows: A. On-street handicap parking—east side of SW 11th Street from Tuttle Street to Murphy Street. B. Code revisions related to the vacation of City right-of-way in the area bound by Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway on the north, Maury Street on the south, SE 23rd Street on the east, and the Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way on the west. C. Code corrections—Hull Avenue from E 14th Street to E 40th Court. D. Removal of daytime parking restriction— south side of Lyon Street from E 6th Street to Pennsylvania Avenue. FORM APPROVED: Lawrence F. Dempsey, Assistant City Attorney T.M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a summary of Ordinance No.15,641, passed by the City Council of said City on January 22, 2018, signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018, and published as provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by Publication Order No. 10217. Diane Rauh, City Clerk ORDINANCE NO. 15,642 AN ORDINANCE vacating a portion of the south 6 feet of Des Moines Street right-of-way adjoining 621 Des Moines Street. WHEREAS, all prior requirements of law pertaining to the vacation of public right-of-way have been fully observed; and WHEREAS, it is desirable that the public right-ofway herein described be vacated; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Des Moines, Iowa: Sec. 1. That a portion of the south 6 feet of Des Moines Street right-of-way adjoining 621 Des Moines Street, more specifically described as follows, be and is hereby vacated: The South Six (6) Feet of Des Moines Street rightof-way lying north of and adjoining Lot 3, Block 20, EAST FORT DES MOINES, an Official Plat, all now included in and forming a part of the City of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa; and containing 480 square feet. Sec. 2. The City of Des Moines hereby reserves an easement upon the property described above for the continued use and maintenance of any utilities now in place, with the right of entry for servicing same. Sec. 3. That the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to cause certified copies of this ordinance and proof of publication thereof together with proof of publication of the notice of the public hearing on this matter to be properly filed in the office of the Recorder of Polk County, Iowa. Sec. 4. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. FORM APPROVED: Lisa A. Wieland, Assistant City Attorney T. M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true copy of an ordinance (Roll Call No. 18-0145), passed by the City Council

ORDINANCE NO. 15,643 AN ORDINANCE to amend the Official Zoning Map of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, set forth in Section 134-277 of the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, by rezoning and changing the district classification of certain property located in the vicinity of 210 Watson Avenue from the “R1-60” One-Family Low-Density Residential District to Limited “R-2” Two-Family Residential District classification. Be It Ordained by the City Council of the City of Des Moines, Iowa: Section 1. That the Official Zoning Map of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, set forth in Section 134-277 of the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, be and the same is hereby amended by rezoning and changing the district classification of certain property located in the vicinity of 210 Watson Avenue, more fully described as follows, from the “R160” One-Family Low-Density Residential District to Limited “R-2” Two-Family Residential District classification: Lots 57, 58 and 59 in Block 4 of OLD ORCHARD BEACH, an Official Plat, now included in and forming a part of the City of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Section 2. That this ordinance and the zoning granted by the terms hereof are subject to the following imposed additional conditions which have been agreed to and accepted by execution of an Acceptance of Rezoning Ordinance by all owners of said property and are binding upon the owners and their successors, heirs, and assigns as follows: (1) Permitted uses shall be limited to one-

family or two-family residential. (2) Any dwelling unit shall have at least 1,100 square feet of floor space. (3) The exterior of any dwelling unit shall be constructed of horizontal cement board or cedar overlap siding, or of masonry (brick or stone). (4) The front elevation of any dwelling unit shall contain either a front porch of not less than 60 square feet or 1/3 masonry (brick or stone) siding. (5) The front elevation of any dwelling unit constructed shall include either window trim not less than 4 inches in width or shutters on each side of each window. (6) Any dwelling unit shall be constructed with architectural-style asphalt shingles. (7) A minimum 288-square foot garage shall be provided for each dwelling unit. The garage shall be accessed by a paved driveway and be located outside of the minimum required front yard setback; and Section 3. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. Section 4. That the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to cause certified copies of the Acceptance of Rezoning Ordinance, this ordinance, vicinity map and proof of publication of this ordinance to be properly filed in the office of the County Recorder of the county in which the subject property is located. FORM APPROVED: Glenna K. Frank, Assistant City Attorney T. M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true copy of an ordinance (Roll Call No. 18-0156), passed by the City Council of said City at a meeting held January 22, 2018 signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018 and published and provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by

Publication Order No. 10219. Diane Rauh, City Clerk ORDINANCE NO. 15,644 AN ORDINANCE to amend the Official Zoning Map of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, set forth in Section 134-277 of the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, by rezoning and changing the district classification of certain property located in the vicinity of 215 Watson Avenue from the “R1-60” One-Family Low-Density Residential District to Limited “R-2” Two-Family Residential District classification. Be It Ordained by the City Council of the City of Des Moines, Iowa: Section 1. That the Official Zoning Map of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, set forth in Section 134-277 of the Municipal Code of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, 2000, be and the same is hereby amended by rezoning and changing the district classification of certain property located in the vicinity of 215 Watson Avenue, more fully described as follows, from the “R160” One-Family Low-Density Residential District to Limited “R-2” Two-Family Residential District classification: Lots 7, 8 and 9 in Block 5 of OLD ORCHARD BEACH, an Official Plat, now included in and forming a part of the City of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Section 2. That this ordinance and the zoning granted by the terms hereof are subject to the following imposed additional conditions which have been agreed to and accepted by execution of an Acceptance of Rezoning Ordinance by all owners of said property and are binding upon the owners and their successors, heirs, and assigns as follows: (1) Permitted uses shall be limited to onefamily or two-family residential. (2) Any dwelling unit shall have at least 1,100 square feet of floor space. (3) The exterior of any dwelling unit shall be

constructed of horizontal cement board or cedar overlap siding, or of masonry (brick or stone). (4) The front elevation of any dwelling unit shall contain either a front porch of not less than 60 square feet or 1/3 masonry (brick or stone) siding. (5) The front elevation of any dwelling unit constructed shall include either window trim not less than 4 inches in width or shutters on each side of each window. (6) Any dwelling unit shall be constructed with architectural-style asphalt shingles. (7) A minimum 288-square foot garage shall be provided for each dwelling unit. The garage shall be accessed by a paved driveway and be located outside of the minimum required front yard setback. Section 3. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and publication as provided by law. Section 4. That the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to cause certified copies of the Acceptance of Rezoning Ordinance, this ordinance, vicinity map and proof of publication of this ordinance to be properly filed in the office of the County Recorder of the county in which the subject property is located. FORM APPROVED: Glenna K. Frank, Assistant City Attorney T. M. Franklin Cownie, Mayor Attest: I, Diane Rauh, City Clerk of the City of Des Moines, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true copy of an ordinance (Roll Call No. 18-0159), passed by the City Council of said City at a meeting held January 22, 2018 signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018 and published and provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by Publication Order No. 10220. Diane Rauh, City Clerk

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CITY ORDINANCES of said City at a meeting held January 22, 2018 signed by the Mayor on January 22, 2018 and published and provided by law in the Business Record on February 9, 2018. Authorized by Publication Order No. 10218. Diane Rauh, City Clerk

POLK COUNTY PUBLICATION BILL LIST TO BE PAID 1-30-2018 VENDOR AMOUNT REASON: CAPITAL OUTLAYS ECHO ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO $375.131 IOWA EVENTS CENTER $558,194.012 MIDAMERICAN ENERGY $2,642.721 VAN METER INDUSTRIAL INC $853.461 REASON: HUMAN SERVS PROV CHGS 15TH ST APTS $415.001 1620 E GRAND LLC $550.001 8035 REAL ESTATE LLC $838.001 AB HOME IMPROVEMENT LLC $6,928.102 ALLEN, ED $430.001 ANAWIM HOUSING $1,174.003 APARTMENTS BY ELLINGSON LLC $451.001 ARBOR WOODS APARTMENTS LLC $1,585.003 ARCHER, RANDALL $2,700.001 BAKER REAL ESTATE LTD. PART. $451.001 BARNES, MICHAEL $798.003 BEACON OF LIFE $420.001 BEE-LINE SEWER SERVICE LLC $300.001 BELMONT DRIVE 1218 HOUSING COOP$430.001 BENEDICT HOME $430.001 BENNETT GRAND WOODS LLC $225.501 BROADWAY HEIGHTS APTS LLC $430.001 CALDWELL PARRISH FUNERAL HOME $775.001 CANADA, WILLIAM $451.001 CANDLE RIDGE RESIDENTIAL COOP INC $430.001 CANTERBURY EQUITIES LLC $846.001 CANTERBURY PARK APTS II $533.001 CCVI, LLC $101.001 CENTRAL IOWA SHELTER & SERVICES INC $3,500.001 CITY OF ANKENY MUNICIPAL WATER DEPT $249.291 CITY OF DSM MUNICIPAL HOUSING AGENCY $611.003 CONNETT SERVICES $5,427.006 CORINTHIAN MIDWEST VENTURES II LLC $775.001 CROUCH, DON E. $375.001 CW CONSTRUCTION $482.002 DEER RIDGE 5 APARTMENTS $451.002 DENMAR PROPERTIES LLC $750.001 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE $2,764.001 DES MOINES HEATING COOLING LLC$9,325.004 DES MOINES WATER WORKS $2,250.5613 DM LEASED HOUSING ASSOC IX LP $533.001 DSM AREA REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTH $288.001 DWB CONSTRUCTION LLC $6,315.322 EAST VILLAGE PARK APARTMENTS LLC $430.001 EPC LLC $1,218.002 FAMILY DISCOUNT $1,200.006 FARIS, RICHARD $1,066.001 FEXSTEVE LIMITED COMPANY $4,065.003

FORMARO, ROXANNE S $860.001 GNY INVESTMENTS LLC $628.001 GOODRICH, JERRI $685.001 GRAY, IVAN $225.501 GRIFFIN (TRUSTEE), CLOVIS F $533.001 GRIMES MHP LLC $467.611 GUILD MORTGAGE $660.031 HAMILTON’S FUNERAL HOME INC. $1,550.002 HERITAGE MECHANICAL COMPANY $6,100.002 HILLCREST GROUP LLC $628.001 HINES, DEBRA $225.501 HOME, INC. $451.001 J&D HOMES $430.001 JENSEN, DAVID $533.001 JERAA, LLC $860.002 JKLM ENTERPRISES LLC $50.001 JORDAN CREEK LLC $430.001 LE PORTE, DONALD C. $430.001 LEGACY PARK LLLP $451.001 LEHS, KENT $1,955.005 LEHS, RANDY $660.001 LOGAN PARK ASSOCIATES L.P. $140.931 MAPLE LANE APARTMENTS $451.001 MAS PROPERTIES LLC $625.001 MC CLISH, MIKE $573.001 MELBOURNE APARTMENTS I LLP $451.001 MELBOURNE APARTMENTS III LLLP $407.001 MID-IOWA ENVIRONMENTAL CORP $1,302.001 MIDAMERICAN ENERGY (GA’S ONLY) $908.063 MOVE UP LC $451.001 MR FREEZE HTG & A/C $2,505.002 NATIONWIDE ADVANTAGE MORTGAGE $441.001 NFM BUILDER SALES $529.991 NORMANDY TERRACE APARTMENTS $628.001 NUVISION HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INC $1,995.5811 PARKSIDE EAST APTS IV LP $533.001 PARKSIDE EAST III APTS LP $310.001 PATE, JEFFREY $710.002 PFM PROPERTIES LLC $675.001 PIONEER WOODS LLC $533.001 PLATT, RJ $533.001 RDGN LLLP $480.001 RELAX INN $115.002 RIVER VALLEY ESTATES, L.P. $1,161.002 RIVERHILLS APARTMENT #2, L.P. $628.001 ROOSE, JASON $430.001 ROSE AVENUE RESIDENTIAL COOP $533.001 ROWECIENDA RESIDENTIAL HOUSING COOP $430.001 SHORT, ROBERT $500.002 SILVER D MEADOW CT LLC $451.001 SILVER OAKS ASSOC. LP $451.001 SOUTHBROOK GREEN APTS LP $225.501 SOUTHERN HORIZON LLC $1,180.002

SOUTHERN KNOLLS LLC $910.002 STARR, JEREMIAH $533.001 SUMMER WOODS APARTMENTS LLC $275.001 SUTTON HILL RESIDENTIAL COOP $1,049.731 SWIFT PROPERTIES LLC $533.001 TBDN INVESTMENT LLC $337.501 TIMBERLAND PARTNERS XVII $430.001 TORGERSON EXCAVATING $8,000.001 TREZAC CONSTRUCTION $7,500.002 TUVELA LLC $625.001 ULMER, LINDA $18.851 URBANDALE WATER DEPT. $62.191 US BANK $314.001 VERIZON WIRELESS $209.121 VILLAGE AT WESTCHESTER $430.001 WAGNER, JEFF $225.501 WAKONDA WEST APARTMENTS $358.001 WALDEN POINT LP $417.001 WESLEY AT HOME $29,310.411 WESTCHESTER SQUARE APTS $451.001 WILLIAMS ST LLC $451.001 WILLOW BEND I LP $451.001 WILLOW PARK PARTNERS, LLC $430.001 REASON: LICENSES AND PERMITS REYES,, LUGO, HECTOR A $35.001 ROSONKE, JASON $42.501 ROYAL PLUMBING LLC $55.001 WOODS, LANE D $50.001 REASON: MENTAL HEALTH SVCS BOGACZYK LAW FIRM, PLLC $570.002 BROADLAWNS MEDICAL CENTER $96,542.481 COMMUNITY SUPPORT ADVOCATES $117,519.913 COOPER, GOEDICKE, REIMER, & REESE P.C.$600.002 CORRECT CARE SOLUTIONS LLC $21,491.122 EASTER SEAL SOCIETY OF IOWA $84,873.903 EYERLY-BALL COMMUNITY MENTAL $142,130.695 GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF DM $7,332.988 HARRINGTON APTS $430.001 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #1759 $20.001 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #1888 $74.744 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01136 $1,026.0552 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01138 $39.612 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01148 $19.691 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01895 $79.704 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01151 $59.013 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01155 $19.071 IOWA FAMILY ASSISTANTS $1,008.931 IOWA HOME CARE LLC $2,898.491 MIDAMERICAN ENERGY (GA’S ONLY) $3,731.3240 PENN CENTER $9,765.001 POLK COUNTY HEALTH SERVICES $36,579.763 SOUTHWEST IOWA TRANSIT $47.501 REASON: MISCELLANEOUS KNOXVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT $4,612.851 NEWTON POLICE DEPARTMENT $4,021.601

REASON: OTH SVCS & CHGS ADAMS COUNTY SHERIFF $9,590.001 ADVANCED ELECTRIC INC $780.001 ADVENTURE LIGHTING $1,549.471 AINSLEY, BILL $551.251 ALLIANT ENERGY $100.361 ALPHA VIDEO & AUDIO INC $4,964.421 ARROW STAGE LINES $750.001 ASCHEMAN, PHILIP L PH.D. $400.001 BARRETT FARMS $715.002 BENTON COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE $4,282.002 BOB LENC LANDSCAPING INC & LAWN CARE $160.402 BOB’S SEPTIC TANK AND MOBILE $100.001 BOULDER CONTRACTING LLC $48,566.931 BRIDGES, KRISTEN $21.351 BROADLAWNS MEDICAL CENTER $1,300.001 BROWNELL, ROBERT $113.801 BURNS, LAURA $159.503 BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS $4,660.003 CANINE TACTICAL $500.001 CAPITOL CITY MINI STORAGE III $264.162 CASSIDY TECHNOLOGIES $5,738.001 CENTURY LINK $6,065.997 CINTAS CORPORATION $795.641 CITY OF DES MOINES $1,444.002 CITY OF RUNNELLS $500.001 CKHANSON LLC $3,510.001 CLEMENTS LAW AND MEDIATION LLC $407.461 COMMUNITY YOUTH CONCEPTS $9,500.001 COMPASS EXPEDITING INC $370.001 CONSUMERS ENERGY $635.491 CONTROL INSTALLATIONS IA INC. $5,683.086 COOPER, JENNIFER $72.001 COOPER, JILLIAN A. $555.691 CORRECT CARE SOLUTIONS LLC $282,838.212 COTT SYSTEM $4,210.001 CROW’S AUTO SERVICE INC $768.622 CSC $433.561 CUMMINS SALES AND SERVICE $389.941 DANIELSON FORGE LLC $400.001 DES MOINES AREA COMM. COLLEGE $800.001 DES MOINES HUMAN RIGHTS $500.001 DES MOINES REGISTER $5,815.1832 DES MOINES WATER WORKS $6,111.407 DIAM PEST CONTROL $205.002 DOORS, INC. $2,954.001 DSM AREA REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTH $4,166.671 DULANEY COURT REPORTING $49.001 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING & EQUIP $190.001 ETHOS DESIGN GROUP INC $4,102.901 FEDEX $1,004.801 FIELD PAPER COMPANY $5,937.001 FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT $15,782.001 FORENSIC CONSULTING LLC $1,576.921

Business Record | February 9, 2018

POLK COUNTY NOTICES

33

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POLK COUNTY NOTICES G & K SERVICES $154.383 G & S SERVICE INC $300.001 GABUS AUTOMOTIVE INC $99.951 GENERAL PARTS LLC $489.121 GLEASON, ROBERT $21.351 GRAY, DAVID (SHERIFF) $5.911 GRAYBAR ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC. $115.963 GREATER DES MOINES LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE $75.001 HALL MEDIATION & LAW $126.001 HIGH POINTE EQUINE $370.001 HOWES & ANDERSON PC $300.001 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01138 $28.452 ICONNECT CORP $962.502 IN THE BAG $443.951 INTERNATIONAL ASSOC. OF CHIEFS $2,775.0011 IOWA EQUINE LLC $302.001 IOWA LUTHERAN HOSPITAL $44.371 IOWA ONE CALL $128.702 IOWA PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION $350.001 IOWA STATE SHERIFFS & DEPUTIES ASSOC$275.0011 IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY $1,332.672 J PETTIECORD, INC $799.501 JIM’S JOHNS INC $500.001 JOHNSON REPORTING SERVICES LTD $133.001 KAVALIER & ASSOCIATES P.C. $4,583.331 KELTEK INC $656.004 KEY COOPERATIVE $631.931 KING, WILLIAM R. $809.711 KRUKOW, AZENET $1,100.001 LAPPE, KRISTY $274.001 LIVE 2 B HEALTHY $1,150.001 MENNEN, NICHOLAS $53.411 MIDAMERICAN ENERGY $75,633.169 MIDLAND POWER COOPERATIVE $454.112 MIDWEST COURT REPORTING $374.603 MILLER, GORDON $80.001 MNG INC $75.001 MORANO JR, FRANK L. $65.141 MUNOZ, KELLI M. $11.991 MUSGRAVE, SHANNON M. $7.641 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COUNTY VETERANS $270.001 NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER FOR FAMILY $825.001 NEVELN CENTER, INC $1,545.001 OWENS, JUNE $1,649.441 PAGE, JACK D. $97.452 PARKS, JOHN R $23.071 PERKINS CONSULTING LLC $1,695.001 PETERSEN COURT REPORTERS INC $222.301 PINELLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE $54.001 POKORNY CONSULTING $250.001 PROFESSIONAL COURT REPORTERS OF IOWA $888.004 RACOM CORPORATION $13,424.505 RAHNER INC $1,000.001 REZARCH, ANN $240.004 RINIKER, MICHAEL J $8.661 ROCHESTER ARMORED CAR CO INC. $334.501 SCAGLIONE, MARY L. $56.712 SCHAEFER, MAUREEN $62.602 SCHMITZ, CALEB M. $8.101 SCHNEIDER GRAPHICS, INC $141.611 SCRYPT, INC. $42.001 SECRETARY OF STATE $30.001 SELGRADE CONSTRUCTION INC $1,725.001 SHRED-IT USA, LLC $102.001 SNYDER & ASSOCIATES INC. $8,753.241 STANLEY CONSULTANTS, INC. $12,594.502 STATE OF IOWA $1,523.001 STATE OF IOWA - JUDICIAL BRANCH $1,355.521 STERICYCLE, INC. $1,123.691 STIVERS FORD $2,141.992 STOEKER GROUP, INC. $484.041 STONE, JEREMY (SHERIFF’S OFFICE) $84.772 STUDENT AIR RIFLE PROGRAM $1,479.651 SWEENEY COURT REPORTING $116.801 TAYLOR, MARY ALICE $374.501 TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS-USA $400.004

TEW, MARY (SHERIFF’S OFFICE) $5.001 TRANS IOWA, L.C. $1,761.101 TRAVEL FEDERATION OF IOWA INC $75.001 TRILIX MARKETING GROUP INC $1,533.792 TYRRELL, SUSAN MARIE $521.252 U.S. CELLULAR $299.711 UNDERGROUND CO., LTD (THE) $1,500.001 UNIFIED CONTRACTING SERVICES INC $604.301 UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE $3,800.001 UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE $425.001 VERIZON WIRELESS $17,977.874 VERTIQ SOFTWARE LLC $5,505.001 VISITING NURSE SERVICES $50.001 W.J. HIGGINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. $6,995.001 $3,552.501 WILSON, JANET WINDSTREAM $256.011 WOOD ROOFING COMPANY, INC $428.011 YOUNG WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER $1,000.001 Z GROUP LLC $117.871 REASON: PERSONAL SERVICES ATHLETIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER $902.693 BONDURANT PHYSICAL THERAPY LLC $3,318.215 CAMPBELL, DAVID $40.001 DES MOINES ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS $424.003 DES MOINES RIVER PHYSICIANS LLC $170.781 FAIRCHILD, MICHAEL $40.001 HICKS, MERLE J. $40.001 JACQUELINE STOKEN, D.O., P.C. $36.001 JOHNSON REPORTING SERVICES LTD $635.751 KNIGHT, MARTIN A. $789.741 LOZANO, BRENT (SHERIFF) $793.781 MEDICAL CENTER ANESTHESIOLOGIS $1,429.683 MERCY CLINICS OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE CLIN $314.543 MONTHEI, RYAN A. $672.061 NEMMERS, PATSY $618.531 PARKS, JOHN R $932.091 SPLASHLIGHT RX $248.331 SPRAGUE, RAY $40.001 ST. DYMPHNA CENTER FOR COUNSELING $160.001 STEINBACH, FRANK $40.001 STIER, MIKKI $40.001 STUBBE & ASSOCIATES $1,614.111 UI COMMUNITY MEDICAL SERVICES LLC $708.474 REASON: SUPPLIES ADVENTURE LIGHTING $13.681 AMERICAN MARKING, INC. $168.923 AMERICAN PLUMBING $26.901 AMERICAN TOPPER & ACCESSORIES $1,390.751 BOB’S TOOLS, INC $11.981 BREWER WHOLESALE MEATS INC. $2,018.081 C. H. MCGUINESS CO., INC. $159.361 CAPITAL SANITARY SUPPLY CO.INC $2,188.895 CARQUEST AUTO PARTS $298.409 CASSIDY TECHNOLOGIES $5,637.001 CENTRAL IOWA DISTRIBUTING INC $519.501 CHARLES GABUS FORD $322.173 CINTAS CORPORATION $4,502.398 CLIVE POWER EQUIPMENT $4.911 CONTROL INSTALLATIONS IA INC. $259.511 CUSTOM AWARDS & EMBROIDERY INC $130.001 DIAMOND OIL CO $1,463.902 DOORS, INC. $144.502 EARL’S TIRES & SERVICE WEST $680.001 EASTERN IOWA TIRE $1,508.682 ELLIOTT EQUIPMENT $182.001 EXTRA PACKAGING LLC $676.311 FIRST CHOICE DISTRIBUTING $3,979.353 FTI GROUP $151.571 GENERAL PARTS LLC $327.701 GOODSOURCE SOLUTIONS $5,896.801 GRAHAM TIRE ANKENY $104.831 GRAINGER $1,053.9410 GRAY, DAVID (SHERIFF) $20.001 GUARANTEE OIL CO, INC $282.151 HAWKEYE TRUCK EQUIPMENT $1,173.424 HY-VEE FOOD STORE #01136 $8.801 INTERSTATE ALL BATTERY CENTER $206.201 IOWA DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION $215.002 IOWA PRISON INDUSTRIES $1,306.342

IOWA TRUCK AND TRAILER $363.082 IRON WORKS LTD $231.001 KARL CHEVROLET, INC. $30.552 KECK OIL, INC. $1,266.121 KIESLER POLICE SUPPLY INC $70.001 LOFFREDO FRESH PRODUCE CO INC $831.352 LUNA, ANTONIO $200.001 MARTIN BROTHERS DIST. CO., INC $14,437.894 MARTIN MARIETTA $6,966.523 MCKESSON GENERAL MEDICAL CORP. $582.705 MENARDS-ANKENY $153.813 MENARDS-CLIVE $1,808.873 MENARDS-DES MOINES $79.873 MIDWEST WHEEL COMPANIES $20.131 MILLER HARDWARE, INC. $11.172 MUNICIPAL SUPPLY, INC. $212.952 O’HALLORAN INTERNATIONAL, INC. $31.461 O’REILLY, JOHN $864.131 OWEN, ROB (PUB WORKS) $128.781 P & P SMALL ENGINES INC. $84.951 PAN-O-GOLD BAKING CO ST CLOUD $8,171.632 PDS PACKAGING $365.171 PLUMB SUPPLY $406.505 PPG ARCHITECTURAL FINISHES INC $34.591 QUAIL HOLLOW FARM $685.001 QUICK FUEL FLEET SERVICES INC $9,136.071 QUICK SUPPLY CO $805.301 RALPH N. SMITH INC $100.001 SAYLORCREEK SAND COMPANY LLC $2,787.933 SECURITY LOCKSMITHS $29.602 SINK PAPER COMPANY $2,547.014 SPRAYER SPECIALTIES $109.781 STATE STEEL OF DES MOINES $2,782.163 STREICHER’S POLICE EQUIPMENT $179.001 SUPPLYWORKS $3,885.092 TOMPKINS INDUSTRIES, INC. $100.232 TRUCK EQUIPMENT, INC. $124.262 ULTRAMAX $4,980.001 VAN METER INDUSTRIAL INC $198.591 VAN WALL EQUIPMENT, INC. $825.001 VERIZON WIRELESS $40.011 WAL-MART COMMUNITY BRC $27.292 WAYNE DENNIS SUPPLY CO. $96.342 WOODSMITH STORE $27.991 XCESSORIES SQUARED DEV. & MRG $481.361 ZIEGLER INC $1,161.624 IOWA EVENTS CENTER REASON: OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES IOWA BEVERAGE $494.22 JOHNSON BROTHERS $672.30 BDI $2,218.88 DOLL DISTRIBUTING $580.00 DOLL DISTRIBUTING $1,700.40 DOLL DISTRIBUTING $966.00 JOHNSON BROTHERS $619.20 AMERIPRIDE $1,967.04 ATLANTIC BOTTLING $3,654.29 BREWER WHOLESALE MEATS $5,800.03 GLOBAL SPECTRUM $1,206.41 GRAZIANOS $41.20 HOBBY LOBBY $607.22 HY VEE $458.86 LARUE DISTRIBUTING $1,080.00 LGC ASSOCIATES $411.92 LOFFREDO $5,883.60 PALMER GROUP $1,504.89 ROTELLAS BAKERY $136.37 US FOOD $21,720.20 REASON: SUPPLIES GUY BROWN $1,079.85 POLK COUNTY EMPLOYEE INSURANCE TO BE PAID 1-30-2018 REASON: OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES WELLMARK $263,617.73 DELTA DENTAL $22,430.25

When submitting by mail, send all public notices to: Business Record Attn: Sami Schrader The Depot at Fourth 100 Fourth St. Des Moines, Iowa 50309 (515) 244-9491 ext. 217 By e-mail, send public notices to: [email protected] E-mails should be sent either in a Microsoft Word or Excel document, Text, or PDF. Please direct all inquiries concerning billing and affidavits of publication to Becky Hotchkiss at (515) 288-3338 ext. 436.

public sale of anyand all records we are storing for Carpenter Law Firm, now in the possession of MDS Records Management, 1870 East Euclid, Des Moines, IA 50313 will be held at 1870 East Euclid. To be sold as one lot only. Such sale will be pursuant to section 554.7209 & 554.7210 of the Code of Iowa. MDS Records Management 1870 East Euclid Des Moines, IA 50313 PUBLISHED IN THE BUSINESS RECORD ON FEBRUARY 2, 2018 AND FEBRUARY 9, 2018.

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION PROCEEDINGS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS The Polk County Board of Supervisors met

in regular session Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. MEMBERS PRESENT: Steve Van Oort, Robert Brownell, John F. Mauro, Tom Hockensmith, Angela Connolly. Moved by Hockensmith, Seconded by Brownell to dispense with the reading of the January 16, 2018 minutes and they stand approved as printed. VOTE YEA: Van Oort, Brownell, Mauro, Hockensmith, Connolly. The Bills as certified by the County Auditor were allowed or disallowed on each according to the certified list, claim numbers 201801230001 – 201801231299. VOTE YEA: Van Oort, Brownell, Mauro, Hockensmith, Connolly. PERMITS: Renewal application for Class “C” Beer Permit and Sunday Sales for Git-n-Go #25, 4224 NW 2nd Avenue. VOTE YEA: Van Oort, Brownell, Hockensmith, Connolly. PASS: Mauro. Renewal application for Class “C” Liquor License and Sunday Sales for Vittoria Lodge (Societa Vittoria Italiana), 7200 NW 2nd Avenue. VOTE YEA: Van Oort, Brownell, Hockensmith, Connolly. PASS: Mauro. RESOLUTIONS: Resolution confirming the Schedule of Assessments for the health nuisance abatement. Resolution approving updated fees for clinical services at the Health Department. Resolution approving release of mortgage on 3600-37th Street (Kitterman). Resolution approving agreement with Precision Builders to address lead hazard repairs at 1532 E. 9th Street (Prieto). Resolution approving agreement with VF Services LLC to address lead hazard repairs at 1301 Williams Street (Rodriguez). Resolution approving 2018 annual abatement of properties. Resolution approving position modifications within Human Resources. Resolution authorizing settlement of workers’ compensation claim (J. Foster). Resolution approving request for Conservation to submit a RISE (Revitalize Iowa’s Sound Economy) grant to the Iowa Department of Transportation (new Jester Park entrance road). APPOINTMENTS: Moved by Hockensmith, Seconded by Mauro that the following Resolution be adopted: BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the individuals named on thisMemorandum be approved for personnel action: Trevor Barber, Sergeant, Sheriff, $86,902 beginning December 30, 2017 Joseph Carpenter, Facility Attend (on-call), Gen Svcs, $15.38 beginning January 23, 2018 Kylie Hervey, Legal Secretary, Co Atty, $45,931 beginning January 22, 2018 Tom Kline, Elec Maint Lab, Auditor, $17.57 beginning January 22, 2018 VOTE YEA: Van Oort, Brownell, Mauro, Hockensmith, Connolly. LET THE RECORD SHOW all resolutions, including Public Hearings, were approved unanimously, unless otherwise noted. Moved by Van Oort, Seconded by Brownell to adjourn until January 30, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. FOUND –––––– Cash In the 2500 block of E Euclid Des Moines, Iowa Owner identify. Phone 286-3575

Business Record | February 9, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICES

34

PUBLIC NOTICES DEADLINES AND REQUIREMENTS ––––––– The deadline for public notices is 3 p.m. Wednesday, 7 business days prior to publication date. TO ENSURE ACCURACY, NO PUBLIC NOTICES WILL BE ACCEPTED BY FAX OR TELEPHONE. We must be notified of any changes to or cancellations of previously submitted notices no later than noon Thursday prior to publication. Notices should be typed (including all signatures, preferably double-spaced) and accompanied by a cover letter stating any publication requirements (such as the number of times the notice is to be published and whether it must be published by a certain date), whom to bill, and a phone number at which you can be reached should any question arise.

NOTICE OF SALE –––––– On Monday, February 19, 2018, 10:00am, a

NOTICE OF SALE –––––– On Monday, February 19,2018, 1:00pm, a public sale of anyand all records we are storing for Tass Enterprises, now in the possession of

MDS Records Management, 1870 East Euclid, Des Moines, IA 50313 will be held at 1870 East Euclid. To be sold as one lot only. Such sale will be pursuant to section 554.7209 & 554.7210 of the Code of Iowa. MDS Records Management 1870 East Euclid Des Moines, IA 50313 PUBLISHED IN THE BUSINESS RECORD ON FEBRUARY 2, 2018 AND FEBRUARY 9, 2018. NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS ——— The Iowa District Court Polk County ———

The people who get it, get it.

Date of second publication February 9, 2018.

Form A674

Iowa Department of Management 11-1-17 EXTENSION DISTRICT COUNTY NAME:

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING -- PROPOSED BUDGET

PUBLIC NOTICE OF STORM WATER DISCHARGE The City of Des Moines, or its Contractor for the following work, plans to submit a Notice of Intent to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to be covered under NPDES General Permit No. 2 “Storm Water Discharge Associated with Industrial Activity for Construction Activities.” The storm water discharge will be from the construction of the Near West Side Sewer Separation Phase 2; Activity ID 07-2017-002. located in NW and SW 1/4 Sec. 5, T78N, R24W & NE and SE 1/4 Sec. 6. T78N, R24W, Polk County Storm water will be discharged from 1 point source and will be discharged to the following stream: Raccoon River. Comments may be submitted to the Storm Water Discharge Coordinator, IOWA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES, Environmental Protection Division, 502 E. 9th Street, Des Moines, IA, 50319-0034. The public may review the Notice of Intent from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at the above address after it has been received by the department. Published in the The Business Record February 9, 2018 NOTICE OF PROOF OF WILL WITHOUT ADMINISTRATION ——— The Iowa District Court Polk County ——— Probate No. ESPR072125 ——— In the matter of the Estate of, Margaret M. Corkery, Deceased. To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Margaret M. Corkery, Deceased, who died on

Fiscal Year 2019 (July 1, 2018 - June 30, 2019) Polk County Ag Extension The Extension Council of the above-named Extension District will conduct a public hearing on the proposed fiscal year budget as follows: Meeting Date: Time: Meeting Location: 2-26-2018 4:00 pm 1625 Adventureland Dr, Ste A, Altoona, IA 50009 At the public hearing any resident or taxpayer may present objections to, or arguments in favor of, any part of the proposed budget. This notice represents a summary of the supporting detail of receipts and expenditures on file with the Extension Council Secretary. Copies of the Supplemental Budget Detail (Schedule 674-A) will be furnished upon request. Extension District Telephone Number: Extension Council Contact Name: 515-957-5760 A

FUND (Use Whole Dollars) 1. County Agricultural Extension Education 2. Unemployment Compensation 3. Tort Liability 4. TOTAL

Paul Gibbins PROPOSED BUDGET SUMMARY B C D E Expenditures

F Estimated

G Estimated

Estimated Amount Utility Tax Ending Fund Estimated To Be Raised Replacement FYE 6-30-2017 FYE 6-30-2018 FYE 6-30-2019 Balance FY2019 By and Property Actual Re-Estimated Budget FY2019 Beg. Balance Taxation Tax Dollars 1,241,193

1,587,758

1,617,024

378,161

374,355

829,020

850,000

0 15,000 20,000 14,305 10,512 12,000 1,255,498 1,613,270 1,649,024 Proposed taxation rate per $1,000 valuation: $

8,635 26,582 413,378 0.0369

17,635 38,582 430,572

10,696 0 839,716

11,000 0 861,000

or about August 19, 2017: You are hereby notified that on the September 7, 2017, the last will and testament of Margaret M. Corkery, deceased, bearing date of the December 1, 2014, was admitted to probate in the above named court and there will be no present administration of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of the county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the

decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Dated this September 7, 2017. Susan M. Exley Proponent Steven C. Despotovish, #AT0002014 Attorney for estate 4200 University Ave, Suite 424 West Des Moines, IA 50266 Date of second publication February 16, 2018.

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Business Record | February 9, 2018

Case No. ESPR072768 ——— In the matter of the Estate of Alice A. Lucas, fna Alice A. Sanders, Deceased. To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Alice A. Lucas, fna Alice A. Sanders, Deceased, who died on or about January 7, 2018: You are hereby notified that on the January 23, 2018, the last will and testament of Alice A. Lucas, fna Alice A. Sanders, deceased, bearing date of the October 21, 2009, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that (Executor Name) was appointed executor of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of said county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against the estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance, and unless so filed by the later to occur of four months from the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) a claim is thereafter forever barred. Dated January 23, 3018. Roger Sanders and Raejean Jansen Executor of estate 6825 NW 87th Ct. Johnston, IA 50131 Paul Thielking, #AT 0007847 Attorney for executor 8230 Hickman Des Moines, IA 50325

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