Transition to


in the proper sequence using clothespins. Allow children to refer to an alphabet chart when completing the activity. Writing. C hild uses scribbles, shapes, ...

Transition to

Kindergarten Sampler

School

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Transition to Kindergarten Sampler

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Week 1

Day 1 Learning Goals Language and Communication • Child names and describes actual or pictured people, places, things, actions, attributes, and events. • Child names and describes actual or pictured people, places, things, actions, attributes, and events.

Vocabulary signal

señal

transportation

transportación

transported

transportar

travel

viajar

vehicle

vehículo

Opening Routines  As a gathering activity have construction paper and templates available for students to make a traffic signal. Display a sample of red, yellow, and green circles on a black rectangle. Assist children with cutting and gluing as needed.

Read and Comprehend Read Aloud If weather permits, complete the Read Aloud activity outside.

Oral Language and Vocabulary Oral Language Development  Can children describe vehicles, places, and actions? Getting There  Initiate a discussion of transportation by asking students how they get to school. Explain to children that a vehicle is a means of traveling on land, such as a car. Ask them to name other vehicles they know.

• Ask: Have you ever traveled by sea or by air?

On what did you travel? ¿Alguna vez has viajado por mar o aire? ¿En qué viajaste?

• Have students describe trips they have taken, pointing out the modes of travel they used.

Vocabulary   Can children use a wide variety of words to discuss concepts?  Explain to children that transportation is a way of getting from one place to another. Say: I sometimes use bus transportation to get where I need to go. A veces utilizo el transporte de autobús para llegar a donde necesito ir. Show children an image of a tractor-trailer, and explain that both people and things can be transported, or moved, from one place to another. Ask children why and how things might be transported from one place to another. For example, you might discuss how food is transported from where it is grown or processed to the local grocery store and why grocery stores have food from a wide variety of places.

 Can children use information from the book in a related activity? Build Background  Explain that rush hour refers to the times of day when the most people are traveling to and from home, school, and work. Listen for Understanding  Display Rush Hour and read the title.

Differentiated  Instruction

Enrichment

Vocabulary Name additional modes of transportation and have children discuss the use of each.

• Pre-teach any unfamiliar vocabulary using child-friendly explanations of vocabulary words. Read the book aloud.

• Have children name the modes of transportation they remember from the book, and write their responses on chart paper or an interactive whiteboard.

• Ask: What is your favorite type of transportation? ¿Cuál es tu tipo de

transporte favorito? Remind children of the list of responses if necessary. Organize children into groups according to their responses.

Respond to the Story  Provide children with large cardboard boxes and art materials. Have them work in teams to create their favorite mode of transportation. Allow children to take turns “driving” or “piloting” the mode of transportation they created. Have children retell the story using their boxes.

  Extra Support Read Aloud You may make this an individual activity by using small boxes for each child.

  Special Needs Behavioral Social/Emotional If small group activities are too overwhelming for a child, give him or her opportunities to work alone or with a partner.

  Draw the modes of transportation on the chart paper or interactive whiteboard as children name them.

  Provide images of loading docks and grocery stores to illustrate and enhance the discussion.

2  Transitions Book  Week 1

Transitions Book  Week 1  3

Week 1

Day 1 Learning Goals Social and Emotional Development • Child accepts responsibility for and regulates own behavior. Emergent Literacy: Reading • Child names most upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet. Emergent Literacy: Writing • Child participates in free drawing and writing activities to deliver information. Physical Development • Child coordinates body movements in a variety of locomotive activities (such as walking, jumping, running, hopping, skipping, and climbing).

Vocabulary caboose

furgón de cola

engine

motor

pack

empaquetar

signs

signos

symbols

símbolos

trip

viaje

Word Work

Language Arts

Phonological Awareness



  Can children find objects that begin with a specific sound? Packing My Suitcase  Prepare ahead by gathering a suitcase and a number of items that you might pack for a trip. Say: I’m ready to pack something that starts with the sound of /t/. Estoy listo para empaquetar algo que comienza con el sonido de /t/. Have children name an item with the matching initial sound, such as a toothbrush, and have a volunteer “pack” it in the suitcase. Repeat for all the items you have gathered. Pack any items in the classroom that children name correctly as beginning with the initial sound you pick, even if the item is not something that you would normally take on a trip.

Writing  Child uses scribbles, shapes, pictures, symbols, and letters to represent language.

Traffic Signs  Have children describe traffic signs with which they are familiar. Display pictures of a variety of traffic signs and ask children if they know what any of the signs mean. Discuss the fact that the signs use symbols and words so that they are easy to recognize. Brainstorm ideas for signs the students can create. Write all ideas on chart paper or an interactive whiteboard. Have students create their own traffic signs using symbols and developmental writing.

Learn About Letters and Sounds  Can children place letters in proper sequence? Alphabet Train  Prepare ahead by creating “train cars” from index cars with an upper case letter written on one side of each card and the corresponding lower case letter written on the other side of the card. Create an engine and a caboose. String a line from one wall to another at an appropriate height for children. Have children create an alphabet train by hanging the letter cars in the proper sequence using clothespins.   Allow children to refer to an alphabet chart when completing the activity.

Social and Emotional ­ evelopment D Making Good Choices  Can children regulate their own behavior? Working Together  Children may need you to model appropriate behavior when working in a group. When disagreements arise, encourage children to discuss their needs with each other and to figure out appropriate compromises with one another.

Differentiated  Instruction

Enrichment

Phonological Awareness If students have mastered initial sounds, complete the activity using letter names.

  Extra Support Learn About Letters and Sounds If children cannot sequence the letters by selecting them randomly, then encourage children to select the letters in the appropriate sequence.

  Special Needs Vision Loss Understanding visual symbols may be difficult for students with vision loss. Prepare signs and symbols with textured surfaces for students to explore tactilely. Explain how sound can be used to help visually impaired people cross the street independently.

Movement

d c b a 4  Transitions Book  Week 1

Prepare ahead a paddle with a red circle on one side and a green circle on the other side. Play “Red Light, Green Light” with children, using the paddle as a visual cue as you say red light luz roja or green light luz verde. Have children start on the far side of the room or playground. Explain that they can move toward you when the light is green but must stop when the light is red. Anyone caught moving on a red light must go back to the start. Repeat as time and attention permit. You may choose a child to be the leader and join the class as a player.

Transitions Book  Week 1  5

Literacy Builders Math Time

ABC Time

  Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child enjoys and chooses reading-related activities.

Materials  Connecting Cubes Pattern Trains  Organize students into pairs. Give one color Connecting Cubes to one child in each pair, and a different color to the other child in each pair. Have children take turns building a “train” by creating an AB pattern with the Connecting Cubes. Literacy Link:  Understanding visual patterns prepares children for letter and sound patterns in reading such as word families and rhyming words. Patterns: Lead 21 Unit 3, page 157; Treasures page 1650; Imagine It Unit 1, page T89; Reading Street Unit 1, page 146; Storytown Unit 2, page T68

Science Time   Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child enjoys and chooses reading-related activities.

Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child names most upper and lower case letters of the alphabet.

Math  Child identifies, duplicates, and creates simple patterns.

Science  Child uses senses to observe, classify, investigate, and collect data.

Materials  ramps, cylindrical containers, objects to fill containers Ramp Race  Provide children with cylindrical containers and objects to fill the containers. Organize children into pairs and have them predict which container will make it down the ramp first. Have children race their containers down the ramp and see if their predictions were correct. Encourage students to change their containers or the contents and race again. Literacy Link:  Developing prediction skills aids reading comprehension. Prediction: Lead 21 Unit 5, page 173; Treasures page 30; Imagine It Unit 1, page T40; Reading Street Unit 1, page 15; Storytown Unit 1, page T31

Materials  Index cards with writing to resemble license plates (2 of each) License Plate Match  Shuffle “license plates” and place them in the center. Have children match pairs. Literacy Link:  Identifying letter shapes is an important skill as students begin to decode. Letter Naming: Lead 21 Unit 1, page 204; Treasures page 24; Imagine It Unit 1, page T26; Reading Street Unit 1, page 17; Storytown Unit 1, page T28

Writing Time Emergent Literacy: Writing  Child writes some letters or reasonable approximations of letters upon request.

Physical Development  Child develops small-muscle strength and control.

Materials  pre-marked road maps, markers, writing paper, pencils Map Path  Prepare color copies of road maps for children. Mark a starting place and an ending place on each map, and have children trace routes between them using markers. Provide writing paper and pencils for children to copy place names and route numbers from the map if they choose. Literacy Link:  Early stages of writing development will lead children to using writing to convey meaning. Handwriting/Penmanship: Lead 21 Unit 6, page 38; Treasures page 26; Imagine It Unit 1, page T28; Reading Street Unit 1, page 18; Storytown Unit 1, page T29

Art Time  Language and Communication  Child communicates relevant information for the situation (for example, introduces herself; requests assistance).

Social Studies Time   Language and Communication  Child uses oral language for a variety of purposes.

Social Studies  Child understands and discusses roles, responsibilities, and services provided by community workers.

Materials  sand or gravel table; toy bulldozers, trucks, and other construction equipment Building Roads  Have children use the toy construction equipment to build roads in the sand or gravel table. Encourage children to work cooperatively when figuring out starting and ending points for the roads. Ask children to point out intersections between roads. Have them describe the buildings and landscape around their roads.



Fine Arts  Child uses and experiments with a variety of art materials and tools in various art activities.

Materials  large sheets of paper, paint, toy cars and trucks with textured wheels Tire Tracks  Have children dip toy cars and trucks into paint and roll them on large sheets of paper to make designs. Have students compare and contrast the tracks made by each toy. Students may also compare and contrast how tracks vary with the amount of paint used, the amount of pressure used when rolling the toys, and so on. Literacy Link:  Learning to compare and contrast leads to increased comprehension in reading. Provide children with appropriate and authentic opportunities to practice these skills. Compare and Contrast: Lead 21 Unit 1, page 35; Treasures page 342; Imagine It Unit 2, page T71; Reading Street Unit 1, page 39; Storytown Unit 1, page T217

Literacy Link:  Describing surroundings introduces children to a rudimentary understanding of setting. Setting: Lead 21 Unit 1, page 22; Treasures page 98; Reading Street Unit 1, page 79; Storytown Unit 1, page T134

6  Transitions Book  Week 2

Transitions Book  Week 2  7

Week 3

Day 1 Learning Goals Language and Communication • Child uses newly learned vocabulary daily in multiple contexts. Emergent Literacy: Reading • Child explores books and other texts to answer questions.

Vocabulary camp

campamento

camping

camping

nature

naturaleza

Opening Routines  Welcome children to class. Point out any special areas of the room that tie in to the camping theme, such as sleeping bags in the Library and Listening Center or flashlights and other camping equipment in the Pretend and Learn Center.

Read Aloud If weather permits, complete the Read Aloud activity outside.

Oral Language and Vocabulary Oral Language Development  Can children use a wide variety of words to name camping equipment and describe how it is used? Going Camping  Allow students to explore camping equipment you have available in the classroom or provide images of camping equipment in use.

• Ask: Have you ever been camping? Where did you go camping?

What did you do when you were camping? ¿Alguna vez has ido de campamento? ¿Dónde ir a acampar? ¿Qué hiciste cuando eras camping?

• Have students name the camping equipment and describe how each piece of equipment is used.

  Create a chart to extend conversation about camping equipment. Ask children to organize the equipment into categories and explain their organization.

Vocabulary  Can children understand how different forms of a word are related to its meaning? Show students an image of a campsite. Explain that a camp is an outdoor place where people live for a short time. Say: The family had their camp in the woods. La familia tenía su campamento en el bosque. Explain that the word camp is also an action word that means to live or to sleep in an outdoor place. Say: They decided to camp for the weekend. Ellos decidieron acampar el fin de semana. Introduce the word camping by asking: Do you like to go camping? ¿Te gusta ir de camping? Say: Look at the camping equipment in the classroom. Mira el equipo de campamento en el aula.

8  Transitions Book  Week 3

Read and Comprehend Can children use information learned in books to answer questions? Build Background  Explain that the word nature describes the things in our world that people don’t make, such as rocks, plants, and animals. Explain that many objects of nature are found outside. Have student identify objects of nature that they can touch or see from where they are sitting. Listen for Understanding  Display Nature Spy and read the title.

• Read the book aloud, pausing to provide child-friendly explanations of vocabulary words. Have children compare and contrast natural objects pictured in the book to objects they have already identified in their environment.

• Ask: How is our environment like the environment pictured in the

book? How is it different? ¿Cómo es nuestro medio ambiente como el medio ambiente representa en el libro? ¿Cómo es diferente?

Respond to the Story  Provide children with strips of masking tape. Pin the tape to their clothing or make bracelets with the tape sticky-side out. Go on a hike, and encourage students to stick small natural objects to the tape. As you hike, relate the objects you see and gather to objects pictured in the book.

Differentiated  Instruction

Enrichment

Read Aloud You may extend the activity by having a “picture safari.” Allow children to take pictures of objects too large to stick to the masking tape.

  Extra Support Read Aloud If children have difficulty classifying objects from nature, practice by doing a sorting activity with pictures of manmade objects from nature.

  Special Needs Delayed Motor Development If a child has difficulty picking up small objects independently, have children work in pairs with one child as the “gatherer” and the other child as the “collector.” You may have the children use bags to hold the object instead of masking tape.

  Name objects as children find them. Have children repeat the name of each object as they stick it to the tape.

Transitions Book  Week 3  9

Week 3

Day 1 Learning Goals Social and Emotional Development • Child follows simple classroom rules and routines. Emergent Literacy: Reading • Child listens for words (for example, hears and separates individual words within a fourword sentence). • Child names most upperand lowercase letters of the alphabet. Emergent Literacy: Writing • Child uses scribbles, shapes, pictures, symbols, and letters to represent language.

Word Work

Language Arts

Phonological Awareness



Can children hear individual words within a sentence? Campfire Chorus  Prepare ahead by creating a “campfire” with paper towel rolls and tissue paper, or use a flashlight to represent the campfire. Have children sit in a circle around the “campfire.” Explain to children that many people sing songs around a campfire when they are camping. Introduce the song “Do Your Ears Hang Low?” from the Teacher’s Treasure Book, page 36. Once children have mastered the lyrics, have them stand. Tell children that you are going to play a game when you sing the song again. Have one child sit down for each word you sing, going around the circle until all children are seated. Then have one child stand for each word you sing until all children are standing. Repeat the sequence until the song is complete.   If children have difficulty discriminating individual words, practice by pausing between each word as you sing.

Learn About Letters and Sounds

Vocabulary campfire

hoguera

scavenger hunt

en busca del tesoro

  Can children identify letters of the alphabet? Letter Scavenger Hunt  Prepare ahead by hiding index cards printed with upper and lower case letters around the classroom. Organize children into teams and distribute a flashlight and a list of letters to each team. Turn out the lights in the classroom and have teams search for assigned letters in the darkened room using their flashlights. Encourage children to work out a fair way to share the flashlight with team members. Remind them to be careful when they are walking in the dark.

Writing  Can children use emergent writing skills to represent language?

Journal Writing  Have children attach one or more of their natural objects to journal paper. If children do not want to use their objects for this activity, allow them to draw natural objects they saw on their hike as an alternative. Have children write about their objects. Guide children’s writing based on individual abilities. Accept scribble-writing or take dictation for students who are not yet writing letters independently. However, practice letter formation with those children. For children who are writing letters independently, allow developmental spelling or provide a model for the words. Encourage all children to label the page with their name.

Differentiated  Instruction

Enrichment

Campfire Chorus If student have mastered isolating individual words, you may complete the activity by isolating syllables instead. Alternatively, you may have all children sit or stand when you sing a focus word.

  Extra Support   Children may journal in English or in the language they use at home. Encourage children who are not yet writing independently to dictate in English if you are not familiar with their first language to ensure accurate modeling.

Social and Emotional ­ evelopment D Making Good Choices  Can children transition easily between classroom activities? Transitions  If children need reinforcement on transitioning between activities, be sure to overtly teach the transition techniques you use, such as sign language or other signals, music, or interactive whiteboard clock alarms. Be sure to warn children that a transition is coming before you initiate the transition in order to give them time to process it.

Letter Scavenger Hunt Assign letters to each group based on each child’s letter recognition skills. Use letters that require additional reinforcement before kindergarten. This activity presents an opportunity to organize children into mixedability groups. As you observe the activity, ensure that all group members are involved in locating the given letters.

  Special Needs Vision Loss Use tactile letters instead of index cards for the Letter Scavenger Hunt.

Movement When children are retelling their own outdoor experiences, allow and encourage them to show their actions as well as describing them. This will not only increase engagement but will also increase understanding for the children listening and watching.

10  Transitions Book  Week 3

Transitions Book  Week 3  11

Literacy Builders Math Time  Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child independently engages in pre-reading behaviors and activities (such as, pretending to read, turning one page at a time). Math  Child collects, organizes, and records data using a graphic representation.

Materials  chart paper, construction paper squares, glue, interactive whiteboard (optional) Nature Graph  Create a graph frame on chart paper or an interactive whiteboard with categories for the nature objects children found on their hike. Make sure children understand how the graph is labeled. Have students complete the graph by charting the objects they found either by gluing construction paper squares to the chart paper or by stamping in the proper column on the interactive whiteboard. Literacy Link:  Graph labels are one type of environmental print. Have children identify other examples of environmental print in the classroom and the community. Environmental Print: LEAD21 Unit 4, page 116; Reading Street Unit 4, page 233; Storytown Unit 4, page T68

Science Time  Language and Communication  Child names and describes actual or pictured people, places, things, actions, attributes, and events. Science  Child identifies organisms and describes their characteristics.

ABC Time  Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child produces the most comon sound for a given letter. Fine Arts  Child expresses ideas, emotions, and moods through individual and collaborative dramatic play.

Materials  tent, sleeping bags, backpacks, canteens, flashlights, other miscellaneous camping equipment Setting Up  Camp Label camping equipment and display it in an open area. Encourage students to set up a camp site. Provide dress-up clothes children can use as they participate in pretend play. Have students identify camping equipment by initial letter and sound by asking leading questions such as What piece of camping equipment starts with a t? What sounds does that letter make? Literacy Link:  Knowing the most common sound associated with individual letters is critical for developing decoding skills. Be sure to focus on associating the sound to the formation of the letter as well as the letter name. Letter/Sound Correspondence: LEAD21 Unit 2; Treasures page 24; Imagine It Unit 1, page 126; Reading Street Unit 1, page 271; Storytown Unit 1, page T28

Writing Time  Emergent Literacy: Writing  Child uses scribbles, shapes, pictures, symbols, and letters to represent language. Physical Development  Child coordinates body movements in a variety of locomotive activities.

Materials  glass aquarium, dirt, worms

Materials  pillow cases

Worm Habitat  Prepare ahead by purchasing worms from a bait shop or fishing supply store. Set up a worm habitat by filling a glass aquarium with dirt. Encourage children to identify worm tunnels through the glass. Allow students to handle worms, reminding children that the worms are living creatures and should be handled gently. Have children wash their hands when they are finished handling the worms. Ask children to describe the experience using as much detail as possible.

Case Race  Have students put both feet into a pillow case and hold up the pillow case with both hands. Show children how to hop as in a sack race. To make this a whole-class activity, organize students into teams and run as a relay race. Remind children to be aware of their bodies in space so they do not bump into other children. Have children journal about the race.

Literacy Link:  Describing words, or adjectives, are important to developing robust writing. Ask leading questions throughout the day to encourage children to use more describing words. Environmental Print: LEAD21 Unit 6, page 38; Treasures page 1508; Imagine It Unit 2, page T76; Reading Street Unit 1,

Literacy Link:  Journal writing is used to reinforce or enhance daily writing instruction and to provide students with a creative outlet to express themselves. Journal Writing: LEAD21 Unit 1, page 30; Treasures page 27; Imagine It Unit 1, page T148; Reading Street Unit 1, page 10; Storytown Unit 1X, page T75

page 145; Storytown Unit 1, page T182

Social Studies Time  Emergent Literacy: Reading  Child explores books and other texts to answer questions. Social Studies Child identifies common areas and features of home, school, and community.

Materials  teacher-prepared map, stuffed bear, pan of water, rocks, miniature trees, tag board folded into a tent shape Map Skills  Prepare ahead a map of the classroom or other area of the school. Use a legend to show a bear cave, a lake, a mountain, a forest, and a camp site. Hide the stuffed bear in the location of the bear cave, the pan of water in the location of the lake, the rocks in the location of the mountain, miniature trees in the location of the forest, and the folded tag board in the location of the camp site. Have children use the map to locate the items. Literacy Link:  Maps can be used to encourage the development of inquiry and study skills. Discuss with children other tools they can use to find needed information. Maps: LEAD21 Unit 3, page 29; Treasures page 438; Reading Street Unit 1, page 278

12  Transitions Book  Week 2

Art Time  Language and Communication  child uses words to identify and understand categories. Fine Arts  Child uses and experiments with a variety of art materials and tools in various art activities.

Materials  white tee-shirts, rubber bands, fabric dye, large containers, newspaper, plastic wrap, fabric paint (optional) Camp Shirts  Label white tee-shirts with children’s names. Help children gather sections of the shirts and tie off with rubber bands. Line the workspace with newspaper, and allow students to dip the shirts into fabric dye. You may choose to dye shirts a single color or multiple colors. Wrap the completed shirts in plastic wrap for 24 hours, then rinse and dry. Fabric paint may be used as an alternative to dye for this activity. Have students compare and contrast their shirts. Literacy Link:  Learning to compare and contrast leads to increased comprehension in reading. Provide children with appropriate and authentic opportunities to practice these skills. Compare and Contrast: LEAD21 Unit 1, page 35; Treasures page 342; Imagine It Unit 2, page T71; Reading Street Unit 1, page 39; Storytown Unit 1, page T217

Transitions Book  Week 2  13

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